Hot answers tagged

40

The only definitive answer to this question is: Ask your vendor. Every vendor, every printer, every t-shirt maker, etc will have their own particular preferences as to how they want to receive files and how they want them set up. Discussing this with your vendor before you begin is crucial to ensure that the process goes smoothly. The general rules of ...


18

The PPI doesn't really matter if you use pixels as units; 1000x1000 pixels at 300 or 72ppi will still be 1000x1000 pixels. But when you change the units to inches, then you'll notice one is smaller than the other; there will be be more pixels per inch as the name says. As you mentioned, PPI is more for printing, but it can also now be used as a reference for ...


9

1: No. The printer will print the image using the most appropriate resolution it has at its disposal. This is why we have drivers. 2: Short answer, yes. Long answer, it depends. Depending on how the printer software uses the word "quality", the printer may use more or less ink. In some cases, a "draft" quality will use less ink (and produce a lower quality ...


7

Determining PPI Resolution given the Viewing Distance from the image For Raster (halftone screened) graphics, the PPI resolution is determined in two steps using only basic arithmetic. There's nothing mysterious. Step 1. Determine the necessary LPI (Lines Per Inch) A simple formula for the minimum acceptable LPI for viewing distance has been determined by ...


7

Basics Illustrator is a vector program and it is resolution independent. (E.g. If you create an artwork on an Artboard of 300 x 200 pixels, you can export your artwork at 3000 x 2000 without loosing quality. Short Answer to your question Whenever you want to export an image (JPG, PNG etc), always use Save for web. Or save for screens. File > Export > ...


7

DPI is completely irrelevant. What matters is the number of pixels. A non-retina iPhone, for instance, is 320 pixels across. A retina iPhone is 640. (The iPhone 6's retina is 750 pixels wide). What makes a device 'retina' is that it uses more than one physical pixel to create a virtual pixel. An non-retina iPhone and an iPhone 5 are both 320 virtual ...


7

There is no such thing as a 300PPI image PPI is not an inherent property of an image. There is no such thing as a 300PPI image, or a 72PPI image. PPI is just a useful measurement for determining the print size of an image. Which means PPI is completely irrelevant unless accompanied by physical dimensions. If someone says "Can we have that image in ...


6

I think Jan Steinman was close with his angular explanation. The DPI table is good as well but in the end it all comes down to pixels not DPI for photographic images. Forget DPI, a good rule of thumb is that across your field of view your eye can not see more than 8,000 pixels. Therefore you should not create a bitmap image of more than 8,000 pixels across. ...


6

As a general rule, when your working on a screen, forget about physical dimensions and resolution (PPI). All that affects the size you see something on screen is its pixel dimensions. Your screen doesn't know what an inch is, all it knows is pixels. In your examples: 1×1 inch image at 72PPI is 72×72 pixels. 1×1 inch image at 27PPI is 27×27 pixels. Your ...


6

You should make your cover photo the same dimensions that Facebook recommends at 820 W x 312 H pixels. You can export this at 72 dpi. https://www.facebook.com/help/125379114252045 Your second attempt at saving as 300 dpi is too large, because you uploaded a square image into a rectangle space. The image will fill the space until the image is 820 pixels wide. ...


5

For printing a poster, should I go for 8 or 16-Bit mode? 16-bit color is usually overkill for most any project. Professional photographers will often use it for the flexibility it provides when editing RAW imagery, but beyond that, it's not usually something you'd need to deal with. For putting my poster on web, what should be the ppi because I think ...


5

Here's a full step-by-step (based on Adobe Acrobat Pro X): To quickly do it now Edit > Preflight (or shift & cmd/ctrl & x) Under 'PDF Analysis', select List page objects, grouped by type of object, then hit Analyze The results break your images out into handy ranges: Open these out, and you get a list of images. Clicking any takes you straight to ...


5

For Raster (halftone screened) graphics, the PPI resolution is determined in two steps using only basic arithmetic. There's nothing mysterious. Step 1. Determine the necessary LPI Step 2. Use the LPI to determine the PPI The formula for the minimum acceptable LPI for viewing distance has been determined by the Specialty Graphic Imaging Association The "...


5

I will go into details what the "dpi" actually means, by examples; with that, you may just see the answer yourself.: In short, your image consists of dots of colour, which are next to each other. But the do not have size in any physical sense. Now, when you show an image on a screen, you will normally just put the dot colors of the image into the raster of ...


5

800 pixels by 800 pixels and need to convert them in Photoshop to 72 ppi for web use (at the same size: 800px by 800px). There's no conversion to do. If they're 800 pixels by 800 pixels, that's it, they're the size you need. However, 300ppi at 800px by 800px is like a 2.3" by 2.3" picture, so are you sure the files are currently at 800pixels by 800pixels? ...


5

Answering the specific points in the question: ...two documents with same pixel dimensions (1280x768)... When I saved both in .png, they have the same size on the hard disk Those aren't normal low and high res variants - what you have there, is two images that are identical, except that the low PPI thinks it's going to spread those 1280x768 pixels ...


5

Other answers have more than adequately explained resolution, so I'll explain density, which has a VERY different meaning in the graphic design world. Ink density is the total area coverage of paper by the printed ink dots, from 0-400% (100% each for CMYK), and this is important because depending on the printing process, only 250-350% is available for use, ...


5

Pixels have no size. Pixels are not a physical entity, they don't exist. You can't hold them, you can't touch them, you can't measure them. A pixel is merely the smallest increment your screen can display. The key words there are "your screen". The pixel size on a 1980 monitor will be different than the pixel size of a 2016 4K display. But they are both ...


5

When working on a project, its obviously important to use the right resolution Well, it's important to work at the correct size, although arguably not that important*. Work in vectors for anything and everything that isn't specifically an image, then resolution doesn't matter (vectors have no resolution). It's important to use the right resolution for ...


5

Not really.... You can set up error warnings, but nothing will present the "application stopping" alert warning similar to missing links. You could manually select each image and then use either the Info or Links Panel to check each linked image's PPI. You can also use the Preflight panel in InDesign. (Window > Output > Preflight) You have to set up a ...


4

For live trace, it may be better to scale it up to larger pixel dimensions (2-3x), place it, and then trace it. This way you provide more data for the trace. Quality loss from over scaling the raster image is OK in this case because you will be using it as an intermediary step to the vector. IGNORE PPI, the only thing that matters is pixel dimension.


4

You can always design in absolute pixels since your monitor and your devices will never have the same pixel density. For example, you could design everything in xhdpi and therefore maintain the same size throughout. Googles holo templates for example work that way too (but in mdpi). The only difference that you'll experience is that your desktop won't show ...


4

what's the difference between a 360ppi mock vs a 72ppi mock When talking about screen mock-ups, absolutely nothing. The only thing that matters is pixel dimensions. As for your concerns, non of them are really all that much of an issue for a team of designers and developers that understand the process. Very large file sizes Hard drives are cheap. :) ...


4

Note that you cannot alter an image's PPI (pixels per inch) in-printer, only DPI (dots per inch). Modifying PPI can only be done in an image editing application. By various terms it's called “up-res'ing” because you're upping the resolution through interpolation. That is, you're making up data that isn't in the original file. This is why you didn't see any ...


4

It depends on how close you expect the viewer to stand, as vision is based on angular frequency. If your image has a certain size and you need to print it at some size then there is not much you can do about the resolution. 150 PPI is usually quite acceptable for items you view at a distance. Most human sized outdoor commercials are at that kind of ...


4

The fundamental issue You want to know what width and height your image has to be, measured in pixels. The PPI value (or DPI, if used interchangeably) can help you determine this. It literally stands for Pixels Per Inch. The following equation describes the relationship of the image size in pixel, in inches and the pixel-per-inch value that connects both ...


4

I like a lot the reasoning of the question. I will break a little a rigorous analysis for the sake of making this answer as simple (and practical) as possible. Each dot consists of more than one pixel... Is there some attribute like pixel per dot? This could be, to some extent, be the other way. One pixel formed by several dots. And my short answer is Yes. ...


4

From the article: For example, if you are printing a 150ppi image at 600dpi, each “pixel” will consist of 16 dots (600 dots/150 “pixels” = 4 rows of 4 dots per “pixel”). 600 divided by 150 is 4, so the numbers make perfect sense. From what I gather it should have been 4 dots / pixel. Why "4 rows of 4 dots per pixel". What you have to remember is that ...


4

Resample = Interpolate pixels to add additional data With resample checked. . . Adjusting the PPI setting - the image dimensions do not change. Photoshop interpolates the pixel data to add or subtract pixels based upon your PPI adjustment while maintaining the existing width and height of the image. In short, Photoshop adds pixel data when needed. ...


4

MacBook Pros have Retina displays. This means that there are 2880x1800 physical pixels on your screen. However, as you have noticed, there's only 1440x900 logical pixels. If the MacBook calculated logical pixels at the same size as the physical pixels, everything would be too small. After all, they're called Retina displays because the physical pixels are ...


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible