26

Spot A Pantone is a Pantone when it's a "spot" color. Make sure your Pantone swatches have the color type "spot color". Even if you color swatch says Pantone XYZ, it doesn't make it a Pantone; if it's not a spot color, it will be considered as a process color (CMYK). Conversion during export If you are 100% certain that your swatches are ...


16

It's a DuPont proprietary colour proofing process. It was originally a photographic process. They now have a digital version -- basically a colour-calibrated high-res inkjet print. I haven't actually heard the term used in the fully digital (computer to plate) era though. Maybe there are just a lot more options from competitors these days. Anyway, it's ...


11

Cromalin proofing was something I used to do, daily, as a pre-press lithographer. After we had produced the 4-colour negatives for a print job, we would coat a piece of gloss white card with a clear photosensitive layer, using a heat roller. Then we would expose the yellow negative under the same halogen lights that we would use for exposing plates or for ...


10

Do whatever you want. But do something interesting. Starting from a single gray image A normal duotone is made of a single grayscale image (A) used by two inks (B, C). You can adjust the curves on one ink to modify the amount of the final ink on that plate. In this case (D), I am lowering the blue ink on the face and adding more on the dark areas. The Z ...


6

This seems to work: Install the open source indesign alternative Scribus, Mac and Windows (there's also an official portable version for Windows on sourceforge that doesn't require installation). WARNING: its interface is very confusing... But, it's free and does this particular job, there's only one simple thing we need to use it for. Open it up, go to ...


6

Not if the PDF is saved correctly and the font licensing allows for embedding fonts. If you save a PDF as a PDF/X compatible file, by default fonts (or a subset) are embedded within the PDF. There should be no need to have actual font files to output the PDF. However, if someone wants to open that PDF in something like Illustrator, they then would need the ...


5

I print Dye Sublimation at work. About 90% of the time the PMS swatches from Illustrator are off. A number of factors change the actual color output, some of these things may not pertain to you but no the less. Clog heads in the printer Material printed on Rip file settings Room lighting Heat Transfer time I could go on but I imagine that whom ever the ...


5

Ask your printer as Scott mentions what size the barcode needs to be. If its a purely graphical scanner system then you should be able to make it whatever color you want and fairly small. Can you use invisible ink? No you cannot use invisible ink. Barcodes are an optical system. Most have now gone "cheap" using basically 2D image processing to scan the ...


4

This is a very nice question ... and guess what!? there is an invisible ink !! and it could be done in various ways. The First method is selecting some color combinations. If you couldn't change the design at least you could select some other color combinations to dissolve the barcode between your design. The following example are scannable. The best ...


4

How should I communicate to the designer that I need their native files for prepress purposes ONLY? Is that even acceptable? We have missed deadlines in the past for our clients because their designer cannot make the needed changes in time, or does it incorrectly, or not at all. I do not know many designers who will hand off their native files even ...


4

I can't speak for everyone, but I generally have no issue providing files for press. I do not provide native files to clients for free. Perhaps the issue is the client is your middle-man. Any client asking for files is met with a pretty standard "they aren't free, see the contract" response. Any press house asking for files is treated differently. If you ...


4

If the pdf is self contained and, well prepared it should be no issues. It is a common practice when making layouts of magazines where peolpe send de adds. Edited: Always there are things that could go wrong. But make a test, prepare some PDF, make a layout, insert them and at the end, prepare another PDF with the other PDFs inside. If you can see it ...


3

put your varnishes on the topmost layers--each on a separate layer--do not trap! the print provider will handle it in a way that's best for their process. note: I work in prepress (30 years+) we do not trap varnishes--we do however use a variety of processes depending on the press--sometimes we use what's called a 'strike thru' varnish--the gloss is applied ...


3

Why you should use one or the other is situational. In some situation, you might even end up using both to make sure your file is fully compatible, ending with Rasterize Object ultimately. If you try to use both rasterize effects, you'll notice: 1) The Effect Rasterize (In the menu -› Effect / Rasterize) The Effect Rasterize keeps your effect within the ...


3

First you need to prepare your file to the necessary size and evaluate the effective dpi. Then you can take one fragment (A4 or Letterhead size) and print that on the equipment you will be using as a test. I don't see any other way to understand how it will look when printed.


3

Great question by the way. First off we're fortunate to live in an age where a properly built PDF will get you perfect prints (or near perfect) most of the time with most printers. Meaning the tools and processes are getting to a point where the designer typically does not need to worry (much) about the finer details of print production. So that out of the ...


3

Hsawires gave an excelent explanation about colors. I'm adding my 2 cents. You can play with the size and proportion of the barcode. There are some limits on the offical guidelines of barcodes. But In my opinion are very square. You can reduce the size of the barcode lets say 75% and reduce the height of the bars in 50%-70%. and can be read by a linear ...


3

why we should not do this. I would not say if you should or not. But you probably need to open your options. A brand guide preferably should be in an "absolute color" mode. A PMS is a good decision if the color matches de desired one. (I strugled a lot of years for a good red on the PMS system, sometimes I gave up for the red 032). But there are some ...


3

This is indeed tricky. Technically white is transparent, also technically no color is transparent also. However, there is not really a entirely set workflow for this. It may be that: The press will just print all white as transparent. This entirely depends on their setup. The press will assume white needs to be added to everything The press wants white as a ...


3

You are probably multiplying a color on top of an image in Illustrator, right? Or maybe you a re doing it some other way. The problem is that when you export a pdf to print using a color profile which should only allow a total ink of 320%, Illustrator (or other applications like InDesign) doesn't analyze your layers in depth to make sure that your layered ...


2

Forms folds and Sizes by Poppy Evans is an excellent book and it's relatively inexpensive. I read it back to back and I also come back to it whenever I need something specific. A bit about what the book chapters: Copyright and proofreading Color and Imaging Type Paper Grid design Binding and folds Envelopes and folders Packaging Postar standars, Bar code ...


2

I've seen the short answer to this from multiple sources as the following tables (in microns): Detail rendering equivalency: FM 20 = 500 lpi FM 25 = 325 lpi FM 35 = 325 lpi FM 36 = 275 lpi However the answer to your question is probably much more complex since there's other factors including paper and the consensus that stochastic printing generally has ...


2

As JCW Trees says. I used to demonstrate the process in a college of printing in the UK, alongside digital proofing (dye-sub), platemaking, digital printing, print finishing... the whole works from origination to a finished product.I really enjoyed that job. Great times. JCW Trees... You left off the final burn! A final layer or two of the polymer, burnt ...


2

Cromalin was invented by my father Robert with Dupont. It used ultraviolet cured polymers. You would laminate a substraight for each color magenta,cyan,yellow and black. Each layer would be exposed to UV through a positive piece of film. The layer remained sticky where it was not cured by the UV and toner was sprinkled over the surface and would stick. You ...


2

Of course it is possible and actually DESIRABLE to work in cmyk, and convert all images to CMYK for offset printing. Print your colour proofs through a RIP, and press check pages as they come off the press. It's proper colour management in CMYK. If anyone here produces top shelf coffee table books for International photographers, they'd understand this. You ...


2

Object > Rasterize is destructive. Once it rasterizes something the only way to un-rasterize it is to use Edit > Undo Effect > Rasterize is non-destructive and designed to let you preview how rasterized objects appear without actually rasterizing anything. (Objects get rasterized upon output if the effect is in use). Why you'd use the effect... ...


2

Clearing out unneeded swatches, brushes, symbols, layer styles, unused fonts, orphan vertices and paths, etc. certainly helps in reducing the likelihood of such an extraneous element causing issues somewhere in production. As an added bonus, it also helps reduce the file size. But as most of my printers prefer a PDF workflow, I generally don't worry about ...


2

For most of my work I deal with screen printing prepress. In the end, it's all the same to me. Regardless of how clean the swatch panel might look, my workflow will remain unchanged. In fact, I'm pretty much going to ignore the provided swatch panel and create my own. So to answer your best practice question: I don't care what you do. It's not that I enjoy ...


2

4 color small text is notoriously difficult to maintain. It's not impossible, but takes a seasoned print provider (or something like a digital copier rather than a press). Black or a single spot color is preferred for small type.


2

One good reason is that scaling down removes details which do not come back if the image is zoomed in. Photos and many other images are bitmaps which can suffer badly. Only vector data can stand it without losses if it's watched on a screen in a vector graphics capable program, but the degradation will be the same also for vectors if it's printed on paper in ...


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