16

I completely realize this is hypothetical, but that head appears to have been specifically created to correlate to the uterus. It's neither strong nor dominant in my view. I would not be comfortable presenting that animal head as being "strong and dominant". To address the unspoken issue.... I feel that people are always going to see things in your art ...


9

Control reactions with your pitch As a designer you should have a presentation/pitch deck ready to lead your clients through your vision and design choices. That being said if you didn't have one or use something similar to layout where you came from in your designs, you can mitigate the questions by then explaining your process and apologizing for any ...


7

I, personally, always brand presentations with the client branding. That way the client gets an overall sense of the proposed design. In fact, my company branding is reduced to monotone and minimal so as to not distract from the proposed client branding. I'm trying to sell the client, not promote my brand in such materials.


6

You're asking a very broad question but I will try to help you in the best way possible. Creating a logo for a business card? Design business card with client information Buy card stock typically 100lb. Run said card stock through printer Set reg. marks and print the business card (print more than one in case there is a print issue or you mess up cutting) ...


5

In my experience it can be quite confusing for the customer if a presentation uses the design company's own branding. There might be a clash of styles and it can seem little smug and out of place to show of your own branding at a presentation. On the other hand, using the proposed branding for the presentation itself can also get messy. Especially at the ...


5

Always Listen First.. Ovaryraptor said it well. Controlling your reaction keeps a positive perception of you intact. If you can't tell by the image, it's the opposite gender you're dealing with. This design/layout was completely function oriented and based on the property layout. (it's a stormwater detention pond with a recreation path around it.) At no ...


4

This really depends on your workflow. Keep in mind that lots of web designers these days forego the use of any graphic software and design directly in their browser. That way, you present your designs in a browser, where they will end up. Clear an concise. If you do use static mockups in any part of your workflow, you could always create a small dynamic ...


4

If your presentation is a printed material, personally I draw a wireframe or the end design proposal and annotate it with comments and explanations. and I do present all possible interaction like so - for example. if you have a pulldown menu or a mega menu in the top navigation bar for example, I render a file having the nav bar with one opened menu item. ...


4

InDesign is a great tool for creating presentations in Acrobat, and it's used that way quite a bit. Page transitions are baked right in (when you export to Interactive PDF). The kind of transition you're asking about are done easily enough just by setting up consecutive pages and transitioning from one to the other. To the viewer, the items will simply ...


4

There are some great online tools that you can make presentations on. The big advantage is that they are responsive across multiple platforms, so users can view the slides from the phone, tablet, or computer. Some I've come across that don't use Flash (like Prezi does) include Slides.com - My personal favorite of this list because of it's navigation system ...


4

Steer clear of the original "safe" fonts: Verdana, Arial, Times, Tahoma, whatever. There are more flexible fonts available now, designed for today's quality display panels. Work smarter and start using Google presentations (via Drive), where you have access to the myriad fonts available on Google fonts. Not only do you get a reliable set of awesome fonts, ...


4

Your question is why I suggest coding in the browser (reference: What are the steps in designing a website?). The best way to display interactivity in a site, app, or anything is the medium it is to be used in. I'm not saying completely develop the site and deliver it. What I am saying is you can deliver stages in the design/development process: Simple (...


4

There is a preset out there for sketch which will target a given element (mockup) and transform your layout onto that mockup, allowing for very fast concept-to-mockup production - it's called "angle" and I've found it pretty effective. https://designcode.io/angle It includes a huge library of both target mockup devices and angles and of common screen ...


4

I once attended a logo unveiling for a huge client, presented by a somewhat famous 'human interface designer' or some self-styled title. He had designed a number of things in various forms (though not logos), and considered himself a rockstar (don't most Creative Directors though?) I always considered him a bit of a tool, and as we were kind of competitors, ...


4

If the presentation needs to be done in Powerpoint, I wouldn't try to use a different platform. As you mentioned, your client might want to change things, so the format should be a popular and easy to edit one. Since re-usability seems to be an important point here, I would consider preparing a Powerpoint template for your client. A template contains ...


4

If you are dealing with one specific, old or poorly calibrated projector, Joojaa is right, you may want to use a profile to simulate it on your monitor. But if you are producing presentations for a number of different projectors, each with their own quirks and colour biases, I would recommend designing with the following in mind: 1. Avoid bright greens. I ...


4

Per Cai's comment here is the link to Google's help page: Change the size of your slides - Docs editors help Once the ratio is known just trim your images to match.


3

In context By that, a logo is rarely sitting all by itself. It's usually part of a bigger presentation--be it on a web page, business card, side of a truck, etc. So, I try and show the logo as it would be used. As to what that specifically is, it all depends on the client. Some clients will get an emailed PDF of a mocked up business card. Some clients may ...


3

There seems to be recent trend towards creating animated GIFs of UI interactions (a quick search on Dribbble will reveal more). I imagine a lot of those are put together using After Effects. InVision recently posted an article outlining how they do this inhouse. While I can understand the appeal of these kinds of deliverables (they're en-vougue, they look ...


3

There is no way to convert a PSD, into a PowerPoint. What you do is you export your graphics assets as PNG to use in PowerPoint. Try to actually bring assets such as logos as fonts if possible. Consider that vector content does not always work so well in PP unless it was created in PP*. It is better if you do most of the designing in PowerPoint itself. ...


3

I would suggest Prezi. It is a different way of presenting stuff, but I believe it is much, much better than PP, in that it has large potential for creative and - most importantly - memorable and comprehensive presentations. Warning. rant. Here is the gigantic trouble with traditional powerpoint and similar presentations: It is linear, and linear only. It ...


3

It depends what your slides are used for and where they will be used. Some projects using slides are meant to be projected on a giant screen; the titles and texts need to be very clear, big, readable and have enough room to not look too busy. In this case, bold, dark, and big is better yes. Make sure there's lot of contrast, and avoid busy backgrounds. If ...


3

Just by looking at your formula I cannot tell what is important and what is not; perhaps before dealing with different colors your should differentiate levels of importance with different sizes. (forgive me the potato-quality image) Regardless of the colors used, it is easier to understand that the bigger elements are more important than the smaller ones. ...


3

Colours are really perceptions, and are affected by other surrounding colours. In a colour you can also play with different characteristics, such as hue, saturation, etc, and in your case also with font weight, font size, etc. My opinion: I assume you will work over white or very light background. The best is to use a neutral grey for symbols (+, /, etc) ...


3

There are some prominent examples of this: The Mitsubishi Pajero was originally named for the Pampas cat (Leopardus pajeros), but in Spanish the term is generally associated with autoeroticism (and the vehicle is marketed as Montero in some markets, notably Spanish-speaking ones). Unicredit has a logo that is derived from the digit one, but has occasionally ...


3

In fact, black on a mid-light grey is only very slightly less legible than black on white, and has been shown to decrease glare-based eyestrain considerably. If the mid grey in question is light enough, it should be easy to adapt your technical drawings - if not, perhaps you should ask the designer who set up the branding guidelines how you should best ...


2

I ran into the same problem, trying to plot data that mapped to the 24 different human chromosomes (1-22, X, and Y). My solution ended up being to develop my own R package: https://cran.r-project.org/web/packages/Polychrome/index.html https://www.jstatsoft.org/article/view/v090c01 This includes tools to build your own palettes and to test the "...


2

Avoid convention when it comes to slides. Lynda.com has a great presentation training for this. Think Steve Jobs, one word on a slide. The slides shouldn't be the bulk of the information, it should be the centering for the topic. If you wanted to report your company had a $5B sales increase you shouldn't do it like this: Sales in 2014: ^$5,000,000,000 Most ...


2

This would depend on how the presentation is being navigated and who is controlling it. From a visual perspective on a projector navigation may serve no purpose if you're the one controlling it. A presentation slide show should only focus on what the current view point is targeting and adding a navigation would results in people always looking at it.. ...


2

Another consideration is your client's capacity. Do they have a graphics team? Who will be editing the presentation? What will their audience be for the presentation (i.e., does it matter if it looks awesome? Or is 'good enough' acceptable?)? I doubt they will like to edit a PSD file, and even if you could convert it, they will have issues with properly ...


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