16

I completely realize this is hypothetical, but that head appears to have been specifically created to correlate to the uterus. It's neither strong nor dominant in my view. I would not be comfortable presenting that animal head as being "strong and dominant". To address the unspoken issue.... I feel that people are always going to see things in your art ...


14

I would judge by the company and its existence. If the company is a well established brand, like Coke Cola, Pepsi, Red Bull then an expectation of the brand's color scheme would be expected in your design and judged with a fine tooth comb. Also, depending on the company they may have a campaign they're trying to stick with that should be defined in the ...


10

Simple. Have a webinar or a remote session from your desktop. Take the same time out as you would in a meeting but with a webinar you control what is shown, done, and the path the discussion should take. If that doesn't work then code the site to only allow certain access or change the links to not follow through. Some options: GoToWebinar Webex ...


10

Replace the word to censor with an equal length innocuous word. For example, many websites will censor words like "kill" or "fxxx" and substitute "hugs". Or substitute "murder" with "lovely". Or "shxx" with "love". Etc... One could do the same for any word really. It looks like a standard ...


9

Control reactions with your pitch As a designer you should have a presentation/pitch deck ready to lead your clients through your vision and design choices. That being said if you didn't have one or use something similar to layout where you came from in your designs, you can mitigate the questions by then explaining your process and apologizing for any ...


5

We can't know if this will work. What we can know is that you don't feel your current brand isn't working for reasons A, B, and C. We've addressed those issues through X, Y, and Z. If you can't frame it in this way than the rebrand either wasn't needed or wasn't well scoped to begin with. In that case you really are just guessing with the money of a small ...


5

How do I know this will work? This is entirely based upon the client and the work being created. There's no "solid" or "universal" reply without some direct knowledge of what was created, what the client was seeking, and the target audience. Some very broad responses...... Well, there are no guarantees with anything conceptual in nature. I can merely pull ...


5

Always Listen First.. Ovaryraptor said it well. Controlling your reaction keeps a positive perception of you intact. If you can't tell by the image, it's the opposite gender you're dealing with. This design/layout was completely function oriented and based on the property layout. (it's a stormwater detention pond with a recreation path around it.) At no ...


5

I'm a chatterbox. I leave notes. Stickies, arrows, numbered captions. Or I would lay out the logos in InDesign and have copy explaining everything alongside, as if it were a transcript of me talking to them face-to-face. I'd also probably have instructions: "Please read through the document in page order, as this will help you to understand the progression ...


4

If it is not a Branding Color Scheme, I don't think the customer should know what colors you are using. but you can present the colors you use in an applicable way, not just dummy colors block beside the desig. what I mean If you are using a yellow for example, you should present the yellow in an applicable way, yellow in background banner, yellow in ...


4

I have also been met with looks of bewilderment or incomprehension in the past, and to combat this I now include a style guide which elaborates either on the use of existing color standards or new ones along with the type fonts, etc., etc. I explain that one great way to keep customers is to keep the brand consistent across all media - thus the need for the ...


4

If you are dealing with one specific, old or poorly calibrated projector, Joojaa is right, you may want to use a profile to simulate it on your monitor. But if you are producing presentations for a number of different projectors, each with their own quirks and colour biases, I would recommend designing with the following in mind: 1. Avoid bright greens. I ...


4

If you want something where neither you or your client have to install a piece of software I would recommend you just use Google Hangouts. Then you can share your screen as you navigate your presentation at the pace you want. And, you don't need a Google+ account to use it.


3

There are some prominent examples of this: The Mitsubishi Pajero was originally named for the Pampas cat (Leopardus pajeros), but in Spanish the term is generally associated with autoeroticism (and the vehicle is marketed as Montero in some markets, notably Spanish-speaking ones). Unicredit has a logo that is derived from the digit one, but has occasionally ...


3

Create an HTML file with the GIF(s) that you want to share placed in the HTML file as images. Then the person receiving the files can click on the HTML file (which will open in their browser by default) and view the animated GIFs as intended. To make things more friendly and idiot proof, I would place the GIFs in a folder on the drive, link them to the ...


3

Upload the GIFs onto an image sharing site, like imgur. Then all you need to do is send the person the link. The above method also avoids the use of memory sticks altogether, as these are sometimes seen as a security threat in some organisations. Animated GIFs are designed to be viewed in a Browser. Windows default photo viewer will not play them. You ...


3

If an in-person or online meeting is not possible then I'd suggest using an annotated PDF full of your designer notes - the equivalent of providing a marked up document. The only downside to this approach would be if you need to show complex motion/interactive designs in which a PDF does not really supply frame-by-frame annotation capabilities. I guess for ...


3

I think it's the perspective which is inconsistent in your link, not the screenshots specifically. This seems more prevalent in the lower 3/4 screenshot. There's no attention to the existing iMac perspective, only the top edge angle. Vanishing point would certainly help this. There are many tutorials for Vanishing Point. And the entire point of the ...


3

Just blur it out or cover it with black boxes. If the actual text isn't important, it's not something you've written, and it'll only be visible briefly, why not just cover it with a blur or a black box? If it's someone else's profanity, maybe leave the first letter visible so that people can tell what word it is without the word itself being visible; if it's ...


3

Instead of the typical black box for censoring, use a gray that is roughly equal to the visual weight/value of the word.


2

If you're mocking the product up in photoshop before coding, you may as well save the image to the correct device resolution, and simply display it on the device itself. For presenting to multiple people, it would be helpful to have some sort of display which shows multiple pages at once, especially if you only have one device to be passed around the room. ...


2

You can do this with color profiles. Any profile aware application should be able to give you a simulated estimate of what the color would be. Also if you configure your operating system to account for the profile it will try to correct the images within gamut. Any colorimeter that that can measure a reflected color in these conditions can be used to ...


2

I believe clients do not care about color unless they already have some prejudice against a particular color or color range. Due to this, showing a color break out too early doesn't spark any interest. I never refer to color breakouts until after I've shown mockups. I walk clients through a piece and specifically indicate why this color works well here ...


2

Unless there is a written contract (which you signed) you OWN the work product. Additionally you have certain 'moral rights' to use the work in your portfolio. As to rejected work. That's cearly the property of the artist or their studio. Our studio has staff designers who work under 'work for hire' agreements. Even so our contacts allow (encourage) ...


2

There is no such thing as a "responsive" presentation. It simply does not exist. There is no responsive PDF either. On the contrary, one objective of a PDF file is that you preserve the proportions of not only the document but also of the content. It is the opposite of responsive. It is fixed. Make the presentation horizontal and a person holding a ...


2

In order to not draw attention to certain words you could blur these words and a random amount of other words as well. or a whole sub sequence of words where the concerned words are contained Thus there is some blurring, but as it's 'quite some blurring' no particular attention will be drawn to a few particular words


1

Okay I figured out an easy solution. Define n-layers: one layer per transition slide. In each layer include all the elements you want to show up simultaneously. Make sure that all objects are within the canvas since we will be relying on the canvas to provide a consistent slide size. When you want to export the slide pdfs click Layer-> Show/hide Current ...


1

This is totally up to you, assuming the terms of these competitions/etc allow you to use the work for self promotion. If you look at diffent portfolios or browse through the Behance showcase, you will see some designers will also include rejected material, proposals, contest entries, etc. It will sometimes be relevant to potential new clients to present ...


1

Showing the color palette for a design to clients depends on what you are designing and the context surrounding it. If your design is the springboard for other collateral (like a website, store or office decor, or part of the branding) then it will matter to the clients. Then you present it as part of the branding style guide, because that context is ...


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