New answers tagged

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Scaling everything at once holding Ctrl/Cmd + Shift (not Alt!) while dragging with the mouse (as @Lucian suggested) can be quite tricky. The outer bounds of your selection is often irregular and having bleeds further complicates the operation. A trick to do it more precisely: Select all with Ctrl/Cmd+A. Group everything with Ctrl/Cmd+G. Cut the group with ...


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Technically, you could try to scale this up, even without converting text to outlines. In InDesign, select absolutely everything via CTRL+A, then simply mouse-drag from one corner of the selection to scale up. The trick is to hold CTRL, SHIFT and ALT (all 3 keys pressed) while mouse dragging. This will auto adjust everything proportionally, including font ...


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Not just your text sizes will be off when you simply enlarge, but also your margins will be very big relative to the size. I'd second @Scott and say that you should rework manually. In the process, educate your customer about the fact that any extra size is additional work.


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You don't need opacity. Set the bottom color to a gradient from 0% color to 100% color. Then, set the top gradient from 100% color to 0% color and set the top color to overprint. (No transparency is needed.) Note that the "ugly grey" you get is due to on screen previewing since apps can't "mix" Spot colors effectively for previewing on an RGB device. If ...


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If the artwork is 100% vector, then work at whatever size you are comfortable. There's nothing inherently beneficial to working oversized if everything is vector. If anything, problems more often occur due to working too small. Since vectors scale infinitely, you can simply resize everything before output if necessary. Just be certain you "scale strokes ...


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I print a lot of graphics and at that size I would expect the file to be 24x36. You could create the graphic at 25% scale but there isn't really a good reason to do that. But you will start to run into problems when your artboard gets around 200 inches. If you want a 24x36 graphic, then yes, I would create the artboard at that size. I say this so your print ...


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First I would put them all in ai file (as you would prepare the invitiation) save as PDF with color profile and send for printing. Just one page with all the pictures. That would give you information if there is something changing. I assume what is on those are ornaments with one color. For the sake of quality and safety I would make it only one plate/...


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I think you could try with SK1 Project It's a lot like inkscape but made with printing in mind.


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Some blending modes can not be achieved with ink on paper (CMYK). Screen is one such mode (as is Overlay, dodge, etc) You can't "lighten" an ink by placing another ink on top of it. If your Illustrator Document Color Mode is CMYK, this failure in the Screen blending mode should have been visible the moment you set the mode to Screen. You must be working in ...


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You can not increase an image's PPI while maintaining it's width and height and maintain quality at the same time. To determine the physical size of an image at print resolution, divide the image's current pixel width and pixel height by the output DPI. Pixel width / Print DPI = print width Pixel height / Print DPI = print height So, for a 2448x3264px ...


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You could use a halftone for the blurred image. As long as the dots are fairly large, and the bitmap is quite high resolution (like 300ppi or more), it should be good enough for screen printing. There's need to make the halftone vector. Here's a quick example below: I blurred a black circle in Photoshop in greyscale mode, and then converted it to a bitmap ...


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Yes you can, I have done so much commercial work using Roboto personally. And I have seen plenty of brading work which included the use of Roboto and various other Google font families. No problem.


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If your screen isn't calibrated, then unless you know exactly what colours you are going to be using - I mean dialled-in Pantone colours specified by the client, not photographs - then you don't know where you're starting from, which makes it fairly pointless to try to decide between two finishing points. You'll find the out of gamut bits easily enough, but ...


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The post is stating a fact. You dont need to see the correct color on your monitor. It is true that you dont need monitor calibration. Many designers can and do live without it. According to our printmasters its entirely normal that designers have turned their color management off; Apparently because that makes users more comfortable designing as color ...


2

Its better if you just go to a local print shop and look at actual paper samples. Sometimes you can find these in art supplies shops or even regular stationery/office supplies shops. The difference can be explained, but it is nothing like touching the actual surface of these. gloss can feel a bit like plastic when you touch it, because its got a shiny ...


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In print documents, the swatch [Black] in InDesign is just plain CMYK black: CMYK(0, 0, 0, 100), so you can just use that in Illustrator. The special thing about [Black] is that InDesign offers the possiblity to turn on Preferences > Appearance of Black > Overprint [Black] Swatch at 100%. Useful for black text and black lines which (in most cases) should ...


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Bleed is an important concept whenever your printing process includes cutting pages. If this is the case then you can be absolutely certain that the page will be cut, but what you cannot be certain of is that the dimensions of what is cut will be exactly what you ordered, nor that the cut will be centred correctly. Bleed is specified to allow you to safely ...


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In other words, whatever value you set for the bleed, that will be excess paper going outside your design and which will be physically cut off in production.


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There are 3 areas... Trim Safety Bleed Trim is the final delivered size of the piece.If you order an A3 flyer, then the trim is the dimension of the A3 (29.7 x 42.0cm) Safety is the margin inside the trim. The area between the trim and where the actual content (text) starts. In most instances you'll want to leave at least 6 or 7mm between your content ...


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Yes, the bleed will be completely trimmed. If you create an A4 flyer (210mm x 297mm), then you'll have to deliver at least 216x303 to your printer. That will get produced, and be trimmed to 210x297 again.


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If you violate a license agreement you are liable for whatever repercussions that may initiate. The other party could seek restitution or a judgement. Your question is no different than any question about breeching a contract or violating terms of an agreement. Even going so far as to say it's not any different than a question about a criminal act ... a la "...


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Not the best solution, but I enlarged the canvas (+1x1") and centred everything. the full drawing now prints. I can drop the canvas back to actual size for the final cut.


2

I would suggest you don't use an effect in Illustrator for this, nor use Illustrator to create the texture itself. Instead, find a good quality high resolution raster image of a nice glitter texture you like. Or alternatively make your own from scratch, using Photoshop or some other raster image editor. Copy and paste it, or place it in Illustrator, and ...


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In the effects menu, select "Document Raster Effect Settings," and set the resolution to 300DPI. This should take care of the graininess, though I'm not sure if it will create a convincing glitter texture without some extra processing. You won't get the clumping and highlights like you see in your sample from Figma. I would recommend generating a large ...


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