53

Other answers have described in detail why you can't expect 100% color likeness when printing with Pantone inks (mainly because they are not colors but inks). My guess is that it leaves you with the question: "If printing with Pantone inks have these additional risks of slight shifts in color, why even bother using them?". As you stated yourself in ...


34

Yeah, you are totally missing something . . . the actual purpose the Pantone system is used for. There is natural variation in colour when printing on a commercial printing press. (Not talking about digital printers here, but traditional printing presses such as offset lithography). Obviously, there are quality standards, which if not met could lead to ...


15

Let me explore. Some are obvious things. Others need to be further explored. We had a printing company print 100,000 stickers and even between this batch there were slight changes of hue First, we need to really explore if you had a change in Hue Hue is a change in "color", you printed red and it turned into blue. There is no way this can occur ...


11

A simple way is opening the PDF in Adobe Acrobat and checking out Overprint Preview. The button looks like this: It opens this window: Under Show you can filter which color mode you want to see. Set it to CMYK to see all CMYK objects in your document and to RGB to see all RGB objects (white objects can be hard to spot this way). (Whether or not it's the ...


5

@Wolff's answer is great and can be very useful. Another way if you prefer to have the data determined without visually needing to verify anything is to use Preflight in Acrobat. I'm using Acrobat Pro X here, merely because I prefer that version. Things should be very similar in newer versions of Acrobat. With a PDF open, choose View > Tools > Print ...


4

Having thin lines in a percentage of black can lead to the lines looking fragmented. Very thin lines might even disappear as they can end up between halftone dots. I generally would advise against having small text in anything other than 100% of an ink. Printing with a gray spot color (often Pantone) at 100% would not have this problem. Here is a preview of ...


4

There's a whole lot wrong here... or a whole lot you are seemingly unaware of. First.. A commercial printer will be looking for 2 colors if you have more than 2 colors for whatever reason.... you don't have a 2/2 document. The actual operation of exporting to a PDF will never create a 2 color file. There's no setting, no job options, nothing to set when ...


4

It's hard to say because the term "brighter" can mean different things. Often we use the term "brightness" as "being closer to white". So a light color like for example CMYK(10,7,20,2) can be said to "brighter" than 100% cyan even though it doesn't appear as "vibrant". A better term might be "cleaner&...


4

In single color printing blurry effects such as glow or drop shadow the color of the effect should be set only white (=paper) or the used print color. The effect settings contain also blending mode. It should be = normal; other blending modes can behave differently than with CMYK or RGB colors. If you expect the effect blur around object A be visible on ...


3

If you want to go down your workaround route using the black plate, I think you'll need to speak to your printer to check it's OK with them. There's no reason why it shouldn't work technically. A plate is just a plate - it has no colour until it's inked on the press. Edit: See note in comments BTW "Computer to Plate" isn't a fully digital printing ...


2

There are a couple things to consider when going with a gradient in a logo. But first, you should almost always use PMS numbers when designing a logo, preferably from the "Coated" palette for color accuracy. Even though there are multiple methods of reproducing the logo in hundreds of different formats, PMS is an internationally accepted standard ...


2

You don't really need to use Pantone colors, as most logos are done in CMYK and/or RGB. Even those logos that do actually use Pantone colors, they also come in CMYK-only and RGB-only versions, because those designers know Pantone can be tricky to work with and generally more expensive to print. However, if you print digitally, which is the more common form ...


2

If you print a PDF to your home inkjet printer.. does it print white ink to make the paper white? No. What is white does not print. White = transparent on press. It doesn't matter what substrate you are printing on (plastic, metal, paper). It doesn't matter if there's a die cut or not. In most printing white is seen as transparent. The only way white ever ...


2

I wouldn't say Pantone is a "joke". Like anything there are other factors which can cause color shifts.... Humidity, barometric pressure, temperature, skill of the pressman, expired inks, poor ink storage... In a perfect world a Pantone would always be a Pantone. But you need to always use a press house in the same region, always use the same ...


2

IMHO, it's impossible to get a perfect match with colors in any system. Pantone is best used as a guide, not an exact, end all be all. It's a great starting point to try to match a color, but to expect the same exact color outcome on everything is just never gonna happen. Not only does everyone see color differently, there are just way too many variables to ...


2

Drag the CMYK color to the Swatches panel. Double-click that swatch... (Or highlight the swatch and choose Swatch Options... from the Swatch Panel menu) Tick the Global option and then OK The color will then have a single slider similar to spot colors, but it is still a CMYk color More info regarding Global Colors can be found in the Help Files.


2

End use home/office printers are not designed to pull paper in the exact same position every time. They do not have any registration. Paper will shift, or move, as it's fed through the printer. If you are printing duplex pages the shifting can occur when the same piece of paper is fed through a second time. It's actually fairly lucky that you get a ...


2

For quality you will want to use a spot color. I've run 5 color jobs just so colored type appears properly ... and I wasn't using anything as delicate and Snell for a typeface. I've also had print providers, on their own, split jobs to 5 color for this reason, at no additional cost, just so they could deliver a quality product. If you are concerned with ...


2

Yes, there is always a significant difference between RGB and CMYK whatever conversion you're doing. Yes, RGB tends to be significantly brighter and/or more saturated, than the converted CMYK equivalent. No, the final print on paper will not look like any of the RGB and CMYK variations on-screen. The end product will also look slightly off. No, the designer ...


2

Printer resolution is listed in two dimensions, because you have the resolution of the printhead (horizontal), and the resolution of the paper advance mechanism (vertical). (The high number is just promotional hype) The higher number is always going to be referencing the printhead resolution, the lower number will represent the paper advance mechanism. In my ...


1

Ignoring any discussion of what is the true highest resolution, "The printer is printing the page in 1 dimensions" is false. The printer may print in a scanline-like fashion, but the paper feeder mechanism itself can act as a resolution limiter: what looks like a smooth feed is usually a step-wise motion with discreet movements at the scale of the ...


1

Thanks to the comments under my question and some additional research I was able to figure this out: Yes, it is possible and reasonable to compensate the media white point of a target color profile—but it depends on the case. Since I’m mostly using Adobe InDesign I will describe the solution within that context. The general idea applies to other applications ...


1

No. There is no explicit guarantee that you can render the document later the way it was made. Theres no guarantee that the external resources will work in the future, fonts etc. Theres no way to audit the trail, or integrity of the document. PDF can easily be marked for archivial so that it can not be modified without your signature (without it being ...


1

White does not generally print. If you want to print white then you need to be very careful about communicating with your printer. Even if the file has a white channel they might omit it. The letters on the wall are most likely laser cut, or surface cut. Mainly due to their size. I mean they can be die cut, but since making the die costs money and a big die ...


1

This is the basic procedure. Be aware not all Pantone colors can be achieved via CMYK. And this method relies on auto-conversion within the software. If you have a (printed) Pantone Bridge Formula Guide, you can get the recommended CMYK values from the Formula Guide. That may yield a closer match. If by "vivid orange" you are referring to something ...


1

You never send a PNG for printing. Forget that. Yes, transparent background shows up as white artboards in Illustrator/InDesign, but it is still transparent background. No, transparent background will never print as a solid white background. Send a PDF to print.


1

Ok. Wait. Something is not right. Have you talked to them and see if they print spot inks? Here is a screenshot of their personalized decks: The ones from the right are most likely digital prints, which definitely will not use spot inks. (They will probably use RGB files). A company that big will probably not use spot inks because this slows down the ...


1

Maybe I'm not good enough for this job. Probably the ones not good enough are the printing company you choosed. My boss assures me the latex printers are calibrated correctly Is your boss, your boss, or the boss of the printing company? Any printer that wants to deliver a professional output must be calibrated, any monitor must. And it must be calibrated ...


1

There are printable foils out there, but it requires a special ink usually. However, if hot foil stamping is an option, you could have the printer foil stamp the gold block, then come back and use a black pigment foil to foil stamp the words. Make sure you check with them that none of the text is too small for a die.


1

It greatly depends on the end use of the banner, the printer it is being printed on, the substrate, and the company you are working with. The newer printers (in the last 10ish years) can print 1200 x 1200 DPI, some of them even higher at good quality and color. If it's a sports field sponsor banner, doesn't really matter. If it's a trade show banner that ...


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible