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Save As PDF is limited to 30000px by 30000px. In any file above those dimensions, the Save As PDF will be disabled. You can scale down the DPI while maintaning the physical dimensions of the artwork e.g. 6 by 2 meters for example.


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For quality you will want to use a spot color. I've run 5 color jobs just so colored type appears properly ... and I wasn't using anything as delicate and Snell for a typeface. I've also had print providers, on their own, split jobs to 5 color for this reason, at no additional cost, just so they could deliver a quality product. If you are concerned with ...


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Having thin lines in a percentage of black can lead to the lines looking fragmented. Very thin lines might even disappear as they can end up between halftone dots. I generally would advise against having small text in anything other than 100% of an ink. Printing with a gray spot color (often Pantone) at 100% would not have this problem. Here is a preview of ...


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Other answers have described in detail why you can't expect 100% color likeness when printing with Pantone inks (mainly because they are not colors but inks). My guess is that it leaves you with the question: "If printing with Pantone inks have these additional risks of slight shifts in color, why even bother using them?". As you stated yourself in ...


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Let me explore. Some are obvious things. Others need to be further explored. We had a printing company print 100,000 stickers and even between this batch there were slight changes of hue First, we need to really explore if you had a change in Hue Hue is a change in "color", you printed red and it turned into blue. There is no way this can occur ...


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Yeah, you are totally missing something . . . the actual purpose the Pantone system is used for. There is natural variation in colour when printing on a commercial printing press. (Not talking about digital printers here, but traditional printing presses such as offset lithography). Obviously, there are quality standards, which if not met could lead to ...


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I wouldn't say Pantone is a "joke". Like anything there are other factors which can cause color shifts.... Humidity, barometric pressure, temperature, skill of the pressman, expired inks, poor ink storage... In a perfect world a Pantone would always be a Pantone. But you need to always use a press house in the same region, always use the same ...


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IMHO, it's impossible to get a perfect match with colors in any system. Pantone is best used as a guide, not an exact, end all be all. It's a great starting point to try to match a color, but to expect the same exact color outcome on everything is just never gonna happen. Not only does everyone see color differently, there are just way too many variables to ...


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