7

According to my understanding of US Copyright law, (I am not an attorney) the artist owns the rights to all work except under 10 specific instances. Well, 11. The 11th being you agree to give away those rights. The other 10 items deal primarily with being an employee, audio/visual work, work for hire, tests, and parts of a "collection" (such as illustrations ...


3

"You get what you pay for." This can largely encompass the mindset of non-paying clientele. They may "settle" where they normally would not, because they aren't paying for the work. So, there's a consideration there when working for free. As @ZachSaucier pointed out effectively.... there's also the lack of timelines, restraints, and traditional demands a ...


3

do paying clients give a damn about portfolio work that was done on a pro-bono / voluntary basis? Some do but most don't. Potential clients will all have their own opinions of your previous work. That's not the important part. You don't need to (read shouldn't) advertise that any previous work experience you have is unpaid. In fact I'd argue that you ...


2

I Am Not A Lawyer, but (shameless adaptation here of another answer, in order to express a contrary view): He allowed (licensed) you to use his intellectual property. The company did not give any consideration for the property, so there was no contract, and not necessarily any change of ownership. In the UK and other Berne Convention countries, copyright ...


2

I Am Not A Lawyer, but: He donated intellectual property. He allowed the company to use a design, and did not ask for compensation. While he may not have given the copyright to the company in writing, if the company has adopted it as their identity, and he donated the logo with the intention of allowing the company to do exactly that, I think the "common ...


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