18

You are correct. This is the way these things are done: only the paragraphs following the first are indented.      I can little hope to better express why we do this than Robert Bringhurst does when he explains in his widely acclaimed “typographer’s bible”, The Elements of Typographic Style: 2.3 Blocks and Paragraphs 2.3.1 ...


10

This is a common approach, but amounts to a stylistic choice. A quick, random check through my library found five books with every paragraph of a chapter indented but the first, one with every paragraph indented, and two with no indentation at all. What you are seeing may have originated with using drop cap lettering: It is easy to imagine as one evolves ...


10

Study Colour Management. Find and worship "CMYK 2.0 by Rick McCleary." I use it as my course text. Tip: What you should be trying to do is to get your screen to look like the print. Begin by making your studio viewing conditions graphics-industry standard and stable. Block out all sources of variable illumination (windows). All illumination should be the ...


9

There are many applications that can do this. I have explained two options that you may consider: (1) Paid Applications: (from Adobe) a. Photoshop - Image manipulation b. Illustrator - Vector Graphics c. Indesign - Layout your cover page/book exactly for Print & Publishing (2) Free Applications: (Open Source) a. GIMP - Image manipulation b. Inkscape - ...


7

Copyright is copyright. Whether you are making money off it or not is irrelevant (though, note that you ARE making money off of it as you're using it for promotional purposes). For use in an in-class project? Likely no big deal in the grand scheme of things. But as part of your online portfolio? That could (even if unlikely) cause you some issues. I'd redo ...


6

Generally, the first paragraph optically separates better because there is the chapter title just above it, with significant spacing between the two. This is why the first paragraph will generally not need an indent. All following paragraphs however become more crowded, with little or no added vertical space in between, so the indent makes more sense ...


5

This can be solved by using the Master page template feature in InDesign. First open a new InDesign document and set up your document to have the number of pages you'd like the document to have (this case it sounds like you'd like 100). In the Pages Panel, simply edit the A-Master section that appears at the top of the panel: Select the A-Master page and ...


5

There are a few (very general) considerations when sending files to be printed in newspapers. The main areas you should focus your attention on are the ones you already do when designing any print piece (font size, for example) and in particular, color, because of the way newspapers are printed. If your ad / design is running without color then all artwork ...


3

The info Yisela and Alan provided above is excellent, and on the mark. A couple other things to keep in mind. Photos used in newspaper are best built at 200dpi. Images for most other high quality publications, packaging, etc, are typically built at 300dpi. This is due to the dot gain Alan referred to. Reversed/knocked out text (i.e., white text on a black/...


3

The only thing I'd add to Yisela's excellent answer is this: explore the newspaper's website (or call them up and ask to speak to the production manager) and find their specs. Each production line is different -- the particular press, its age, the staff who run it, the paper they use, the prepress and editorial software they use, all make a difference. If ...


3

You could follow the language used in Copyright law and say it is "derived from ..." or "a derivatve of ..." A derivative work is a work based on or derived from one or more already existing works. Common derivative works include translations, musical arrangements, motion picture versions of literary material or plays, art reproductions, ...


3

Where can I get the specifications for my half-page magazine ad? From the magazine you are submitting your ad to.


3

Half page? I'm wondering what are the dimensions of the full page! Just send a file with a small bleed on each side (3mm) with a well defined cut marks. I know the generalities like CMYK at 150+ dpi No, you have this wrong. Use 300 ppi. I've looked around and found various "standard" templates but many of them have conflicting dimensions. Ok I am ...


3

There are two possibilities: Grep Styles Object Styles Grep Styles Character Styles: Blue Text Red Text Bold Text Paragraph Style: Label Text: the paragraph style is the one of the last text (30-38) or the most repetitive And those are the Greps: The first one is for the Blue Text ^[\l\u]+(?!/)\r and means every letter and the following between the ...


3

Printing Proofs Before the 80s there was just one simple and unique method called trial and error :-) Knowing that the print originals were made manually, drawing areas where the graphics were, leaving black windows to place the photos, making blue marks for hidden estructural lines and red for the visible ones, and pasting the sheets or strips of texts ...


2

It's up to you, and quite often it's situation dependant. If it's a very niche book that's only going to sell a couple of hundred copies then you're probably going to prefer a flat rate anyway, if you're illustrating the cover of Dan Browns next novel however you might want a piece of the back end... The main thing is getting a fee that you can walk away ...


2

You need to talk to whomever sold the Ad Space to you from the Magazine and get THEIR dimensions not some random guess from us. You could also visit the Magazine's website and look for the dimensions there - some publish them online, some don't. It would typically be called a Media Kit or Media Planner. Take for example Popular Science, a quick Google ...


2

You're right, you need to align your artwork in the live work area (yellow) for best results, NOT the page. You can look at most hardcover or paperback books, you will notice they are easier to read if there's more room in the middle. And because of the binding, when you open a book the central part where the binding is will curve your sheets and give ...


2

In addition to @Lucian's answer... you can use Table and Cell Styles as well. Configure 1 table how you want it to look. Set the type sizes, fonts, colors, borders, headers, footers, etc. Save the various type formatting as Paragraph styles (Header type, cell type, footer type, etc) Save the cell formatting as Cell styles (Header cells, body cells, footer ...


2

You need to answer some questions first. 1. What is the use of the document? a) It can be for commercial print, let's say if you need to do more than 500 copies of it, needs to be distributed in a printed format to customers or it is a material for an expo for example. b) Or it is only to be printed in the office's laser printer, you only need one dozen ...


2

I'm not giving you legal advice however student work that contains copyrighted material falls under the umbrella of the "Fair Use" guidelines according to U.S Copyright Laws and your work may also be protected depending on how "edited" the copyrighted material is to its original unedited state. You can read the law yourself and make your own determination. ...


2

The sample you show was printed using offset lithography on uncoated stock. It looks like a small run so it was probably done sheetwise rather than by web. The finish is matte due to the ink being completely absorbed into the stock. On occasion, a varnish overcoat can be applied to remove or subdue differences in reflection caused by various thicknesses of ...


2

Tracing doesn't necessarily translate to "new" work. For the famous Obama "Hope" poster, Shepard Fairey did exactly this and was sued by the Associated Press for using their photo. Though they settled out of court at the urging from the judge, stating the AP would win the case, from this precedence you're potentially liable. The only true answer though is ...


2

In my experience, an eBrochure is usually a digital version of a brochure that we have developed for print. This is not always the case, more and more we are designing and creating brochures for our clients with only digital distribution in mind. The eBrochures that we produce are typically PDF's with varying degrees of interactivity and multimedia ...


1

I think it's worth mentioning that Affinity Publisher (cheap alternative for Adobe InDesign - one time fee, not subscription) is available for pre-order till June 19th (release date). One important disadvantage till now: cannot import / export indd files (however pdf import / export works pretty well). Give it a try now (public beta installer is available ...


1

It sounds like what you are writing is technical documentation, since you mention a user manual. InDesign's strength is layouts. For technical writing, you generally need better capabilities with your content than just appearance. You might need different formats, the ability to extract data from it, the ability to re-use content, etc. There are a lot of ...


1

It's quite rare designers get royalties on the layout of a book. And rarer an author would accept to give your any royalties for this. And by unlimited publishing, do you mean the client is asking for the "right" to sell 5 or 50,000 copies? Or do you mean using the cover as a template to resell? Because if it's a template to resell, then you can sell him ...


1

I think depends on 2 main things. Design The trim area does not necessary means that you do not touch or put something in this area (like with a photograph). A side note: Thoose margins are (in my opinion) too small to have text, so that is not a "safe area". In my opinion a safe margin is arround half inch or 12 mm on the outer borders. If you are ...


1

I've checked several classic sans-serifs (Helvetica, the Neue Haas Grotesk update of it, Akzidenz Grotesk, and Univers), and they seem to have an convention that I (upper case i) is slightly fatter and taller than l (lower case L). That's good enough for me; in your case you might want to consider using a serif font if it's driving you crazy.


1

I have created a platform to do this. It is called Without Coding. It requires you to export your artwork to images/layers which you can turn into animated objects very easily.


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible