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11

The most fundamental fundamental of good typography for long text is that the type should be "invisible" to the reader, so there is nothing to interfere with the communication of information. From that, we get the principles that serif faces and lightweight sans are better long text than regular sans, and dark on light tends to be preferable to light on dark....


10

Actually there are some pretty simple principles if your number one criteria is a high-readability font for a website. Think mainstream. Thanks to @font-face you could choose from thousands and thousands of fonts - but less popular or newer fonts often have rendering issues between browsers and operating systems, sometimes even when they come from ...


8

Two points I have are: Consider moving in the 'orellia' such that the 'o' is the core of the planet. Also, consider opening up the mouth of the C a little more Please forgive the crudely-edited image


8

Your logo is great as it is, congratulations. You only comitted one sacrilege, posting a tiny resolution image compressed with JPG... Shame! n_n I am not going to explore "new" options (sorry guys) Instead, I am going to try to analyze your logo. The confusion could be between two elements. Space You have room to play with the imaginary letter spacing ...


7

Here is one example of how I would solve this to retain the metaphor you want plus some leads in how I've deconstructed your problem. Orbits are often depicted as a thin line so I kept the wordmark thin to make sure the metaphor is well understood The C from your wordmark stands out from the rest of the font because of its curves. I'd be willing to bet that ...


5

Try to make the C smaller so it doesn't look like an icon before a name, but instead it should look like its actually part of the name. At this point it is indeed like reading more like 'orellia' with something in front. Making the O green is also not a good idea because that can also suggest a separation and visually pushes the C outside the actual wording....


5

Ok I'm going to go ahead and give my thoughts on this. There is no ultimate 'best font' nor can there be because choosing a font depends on many different aspects. What there can be is a 'best method for choosing a font'. So things to consider to help choose the best font for your project; Media: How will the font be displayed, paper, canvas, online, ...


4

Positioning, size, weight, color and font style are all used to drive the viewers attention, i.e. make them read it in a certain order. Higher up, bigger, brighter and to the left (in English) are aspects which draw attention and elevate an elements importance and place in the hierarchy. The first example is not successful in having "software and IT ...


4

Alin, Disclosure: I came across your question because I am associated with Glarminy to which you referred in your question. (I don't know anything about web design, though, so I hope this is not completely useless). I find readability and text/background color choice an important topic and most of the time a neglected one! I'll try to say briefly what I ...


4

Lots of good conversation here. Didn't see mention of my first thought, so I'll offer it: Maybe make the first four letters one color? PRO: This emphasizes the "core" part (of Net Core), and helps the eye see the "C" as a letter. CON: It might break the flow into the "llia" part, inelegantly. You could play with near-tones of color to soften the ...


3

Text legibility affects its readability. Rather than suggest point sizes alone, look at those factors that affect ease of reading. case: upper & lower case mix is more readable than all caps x-height: larger is more readable than smaller leading: more is more readable than solid line length: shorter (10-12 words) are more easily readable than longer ...


3

After all the research (part of which I added in my question) and the decision of conducting my own Survey, the results so far, after 150 votes (and still counting) are: #1 Some people have also commented that while during the day, they prefer the writer2001.com #1 option (the one with 28 votes), during the night, they will change to a light font color on ...


3

Short answer: Yes. With some printing methods, the actual accumulation of link on the page is a serious consideration -- it's why many fonts have/had small nicks ("ink traps") between the serif and the base, where excess ink could pool without distorting the letter shape. In modern offset printing, the amount of ink spread/dot gain that occurs is important ...


3

A lot of people have researched this in a variety of ways and capacities. Some can be found using Google Scholar. Here are a few excerpts I found that pertain to the question, and their source: 2.2.2. Color and visual attention Among a variety of graphic components on screen, color is one of the powerful components of design. Interface designers ...


3

Another idea is to focus on the O and leave the C untouched, since this is about a planet, why not take advantage of that round shape. Just type in the C as you normally would with no adjustments, then turn the O into an actual icon. This will no longer separate the C and will keep your original round green O idea while avoiding the C-O confusion. LATER ...


3

To make the C more legible and appear as part of "core" you might make it the one letter with different color. If you made the C have even flat ends, rather than contour around the planet it will make it more apparent. The 2 circular letters do not blend well with the future font. The solid 'o' next to regular C and other regular letters is not eligible ...


2

I think the test is incorrect. These are not images but letters. It's normal for our minds to try and read the letters although they are separated in boxes. If they are actual pictures, I think we wouldn't "read" them in any particular order but instantly see the one that is most interesting to us. Size would also play part here. If the images are big enough ...


2

I believe that Serif fonts tend to be easier on the eyes for longer periods of reading. For a better reading experience, I think a serif font like Adobe Garamond works well. It's not as "blah" as Times. There are some interesting curves in the serifs that helps make it a bit more "purty" as far as serif fonts go. Here is an article on the subject that I ...


2

I found when printing a book for a biblical scholar there are Hebrew fonts for Hebrew text and we had to use a TrueType font named SBL Hebrew: It worked well in both digital and printed formats. If you'd like to test the font out here's the font download.


2

The whole design is missing an important consideration. Impact. I looked at the words and the background graphic took my attention immediately away from the text. The way the text chopped up image brought my focus on that, and not the text of your main question. 1) If you must use that image, don't integrate it into the text. 2) Image C is your best. 3) Keep ...


2

In particular for text editors, several colour schemes have been developed that could match your criteria. I am listing a few here that you could use as a starting point: Solarized Tommorow Theme I am afraid I cannot say much more about them other than listing the colours and that they are designed to do exactly what you want.


2

Are there scientific experiments, measurements on these? Yes! But... They are usually inconclusive use an incredibly small sample of users are overly narrow in scope tend to lack a lot of context tend to ignore all the other aspects that go in to readability So, I wouldn't put much weight into it at least on the broad "what is the best typeface" level.


2

Maybe all this design needs is for the C to have a serif. Even if the rest of the font doesn't have serifs.


2

Generally, weights thicker then 'bold' are either called 'extra bold', 'black' or 'heavy', so look up any family that would include these super bold weights. One that I have used extensively is Axiforma which includes these things.


2

This post if full of random image examples from a Google Image Search. Images are copyrighted to their original creators. No license or permission should be attributed to any images in this posting. Readability Anytime I get the urge to put a drop shadow on type so it can be read, the design isn't solid. Type should be readable without something like drop ...


2

I would try: dark text in huge font size (white text shown below, but dark can work better with your image) process the image so its a bit more faded, blurred, tinted, grayscale, etc. see what works use high contrast elements for the 'conversion area'


2

Since you mentioned readability, I guess there is some text on the icons. To make them readable when background is causing problem, you can add a solid circle or rounded square behind the main icons with some padding. If you icons already have circle shape or rounded square like thing, the visibility issue can occur if background color matches the icon ...


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