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4

Use \s(\d\.) in the 'Find what' field. \s is the space and (\d\.) defines an expression made up of a digit and a full stop and $1 in the 'Change to' field. this removes the space and keeps the previously defined expression


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Your question is somewhat unclear but you could do the following in InDesign with GREP: — 12345 try: ^ — \d{5} — 123456 try: ^ — \d{6} — 1234567 If you're looking for a range from 12345 to 1234567 try ^ — \d{5,7}. Based on what you left in the comment for: — 1234567¶ you could use — \d{5,7}¶ or — \d{5,7}$. If you want to find anything after ...


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If you have Adobe Bridge that makes it very easy to batch rename the files using Batch Rename and some REGEX. Using String Substitution with REGEX this is what I would do: Find: ^_\d{4}_ Replace: leave blank Explanation: Courtesy of Regex101 ^ asserts position at start of a line _ matches the character _ \d matches any digit equal to 0-9 {4} Quantifier — ...


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InDesign has a number of special GREP characters you can use to your advantage. They can be accessed clicking the @-symbol next to the Find what and Change to fields. In this case you can simply use: \w+:. This means: Any word character (\w) one or more times (+) followed by a colon (:). You can use Find/Change to apply a Character Style to apply a certain ...


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I have got an answer for this question on the Adobe forum. This what is says: According to Peter Kahrel's title "GREP in InDesign 3rd Edition" (ISBN: 978-0-9825083-6-7) - InDesign’s GREP uses the Boost libraries; information on these libraries is available from www.boost.org, especially Perl Regular Expression Syntax - 1.67.0


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