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6

Fastest method The fastest method by far must be to let InDesign automatically scale down the whole document. This is easily achieved: Select the Page Tool. Set Liquid Page Rule to Scale. Press Ctrl / Cmd + A to select all pages. Enter the wanted Width and Height. Strange things may happen and you need to review the whole document carefully and fix ...


6

This can be done here are 4 approaches that work. No apprach is simple to do but its possible. I will describe the conceptually easiest option. Option1: Using polar coordinates Use the offset filter to move your circle center exactly to the middle of your document. Apply polar coordinates. Select the region that is now a strip in your image and scale it ...


4

This is for Inkscape. Select the paths using the Edit Paths by Nodes tool Click and drag to select the nodes you want to resize In the toolbar along the top, hit the Show Transform Handles button Resize using the handles, move into position using the arrow keys on your keyboard. You will likely have to manually adjust the path where the head joins with ...


4

This has nothing to do with SVG really. I think it's the design that is the problem. Looks like the lines are too thin, so when you are rescaling them they are becoming less than a pixel. Change the design if you want something that is to be displayed at such a small size, or alternatively don't scale it so much that it will cause a problem. Yes, it's ...


4

An easy (not perfect) solution could be to use Filter > Distort > Pinch. Make sure the circle is centered in your document. Use Filter > Distort > Pinch and set Amount to a negative number. If an Amount of -100% isn't enough, you can press Alt + Ctrl / Cmd + F to reapply the filter. Afterwards, you can scale the circle down to the desired size.


3

An easy task. Copy your existing vector, then use Edit, Paste in Place. Select Path, Dynamic offset and drag the handle to get the desired offset, which will appear "concentric," although that term is inaccurate.


2

It seems that you are using Nearest Neighbor interpolation, which is the right choice for this operation. What causes your troubles is probably that you have the Reference point location set to the middle: Your image is scaled down from 75x75 px to 60x60 px. Since you ask Photoshop to keep the same center, the image is reduced by 7.5 px on all four sides. ...


2

This is the "Bounding Box" and can be shown or hid by going to View> Show/Hide Bounding Box. In your example you can go to Object> Transform> Reset Bounding Box which will re-orient your bounding box sides to be horizontal/ vertical to your artboard. This would allow you to resize your object horizontally (relative to the Artbord).


2

In general the process is this: Loop over your set of PNG images, and for each one: Get the current dimensions (width & height) Calculate the scaling factor Apply the scale transformation Write the new image out to disk For step 3, the formula involves the Pythagorean theorem. Given W = width, H = height, and R = radius of the circle, the scaling ...


2

Just use the "Nearest neighbor" method, present on many programs. This will duplicate the rows and columns. Try to think in multiples, for example 60px x 10 = 600px. Or multiplied by 20 will give you 1200px. If you do not choose exact multiples some rows will have let's say 11 "clones" and some will have 10, making the resampled pixels ...


1

Social media sites use their own rules how they mangle photos. They need to try to keep the storage costs low enough to maximize their profits. You must be somehow important to the media company (for. ex. the biggest owner) to force them behave as you want. Social media companies do not care of ordinary punters, they are only the food - the special one which ...


1

There are too many frames. You'll need to reduce the number of frames and adjust the frame delay, and reduce the number of colours. This shouldn't impact the quality of the animation too much, although it will not be quite as smooth. Here's how: Open the GIF in Photoshop, and make sure the Timeline is visible Select every odd numbered frame by holding ...


1

You have stumbled uppon one of the legacy problems of digital publishing platforms when it mixes with treating pixels as units. Scroll dow to TL;DR if you dont want to read the context. A bit of a prologue. See there was a time when, nearly all digitally made images were for print publication. This predates internet by a safe margin and there was no ...


1

I have found the solution. I had indeed overlooked something simple. I had confused "fix width/heigh" option with the "lock aspect" option.: I locked the aspect ratio on the image (i believe it was locked by default), and then put the icon on top of the image at the desired position in the lower right hand corner. I grouped the icon and ...


1

Would need more clarity...It seems as if you have different DPI settings, where one might be at 100DPI and the other at 200DPI, thus changing the layer size. If this is the case, adjust it in the menu to match; In the menu select "Image>Image Size" then adjust the resolution(DPI) accordingly.


1

Do you want "fast" or "well designed"? Fast : Open a new INDD document at the new size and File > Place each page of the old document onto a new document page and resize. This may mean some items get too small when scaled. Well Designed : Change the document Set up for the current INDD file and then go through and adjust each page as ...


1

Yes, there is enough data on that file and you do not need even to resample it. An output of 150ppi is almost imperceptible to differentiate from 300ppi on an inkjet-based print. As you have access to a printer you can run an experiment yourself. Print a small file, probably a cropped section of the file you need to print just changing the resolution to ...


1

Speaking empirically, as someone who frequently prints to canvas, those dimensions are good enough for your output size. Upscaling will gain no real detail. Good upscaling algorithms will give an appearance of preserving detail, but in fact you really won't see much difference on a canvas print above about 150 dpi. Your quoted size approximates to 120x90 cm. ...


1

Such transforms are mathematically difficult to define. If your transform is a sine/cosine law, you can use the filters that project your layer to a cylinder (Filters>Map>Map object and map to cylinder). For an arbitrary transform, possibly using a displace map, but the actual map may be difficult to come up with: To create the displace map (#2): ...


1

There's in the basic GIMP configuration filter Distort > Spherize. In horizontal mode it deforms your image like it was used as a bottle label. It's definitely non-linear but you have only a little control. A custom math transformation would be better. It's discussed at the end of this answer. Unfortunately the sparsest area is in the middle, not in the ...


1

Sinc/Lanczos is theoretically optimal for downsampling (shrinking) images. Provides anti-aliasing with minimal blur. Very important for scientific work. Unfortunately, it has been removed in 2.10, and replaced with some other methods which yield blurrier results, at least for significant downsampling. I am usually downsampling high-resolution scientific ...


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