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PPI (Pixels Per Inch) settings are not used in web images. Images on the web, retina displays or otherwise, are displayed by their pixel dimensions (width and height) not any PPI/DPI setting. In fact, many web images such as png, gif, jpg may not even store a ppi setting in their internal data and rely on width and height settings. A 100 pixel x 100 pixel ...


38

The only definitive answer to this question is: Ask your vendor. Every vendor, every printer, every t-shirt maker, etc will have their own particular preferences as to how they want to receive files and how they want them set up. Discussing this with your vendor before you begin is crucial to ensure that the process goes smoothly. The general rules of ...


26

(I am answering to the body of your question, please split this question into 2 things) Screens are way better, lets look at things: You can choose colors as you wish (even if you restrict palette). Your colors aren't smudged across 3 pixels* (Like Amiga) and your palette can actually make sense. Old games were designed with shoestring memory budgets** ...


21

A pixel is a pixel is a pixel. Resolution (as in PPI/DPI) is meaningless* in a digital context, the only time it is meaningful is when you are printing (or otherwise transferring to a physical medium) your image. A 100 × 100 pixel image saved at 72PPI will show on your screen exactly the same as the same as a 100 × 100 pixel image saved ...


21

I suspect that you are seeing realism by chaos. If you take a good look at, for instance, the radishes in the lower right, you will notice that they differ. In this case, by mirror imaging, and position variation. The two rows of beans sprouts on the left also have two distinct images to start with (but didn't mirror image one of them). One needed trick ...


18

The PPI doesn't really matter if you use pixels as units; 1000x1000 pixels at 300 or 72ppi will still be 1000x1000 pixels. But when you change the units to inches, then you'll notice one is smaller than the other; there will be be more pixels per inch as the name says. As you mentioned, PPI is more for printing, but it can also now be used as a reference for ...


17

On a normal monitor imaging element is in a square matrix. We then call the aspect ratio of that pixel 1. Aspect ratio is just the width/height. A aspect ratio of 1 is a square and a aspect of 16/9 is elongated. In the case of monitors we have 2 separate aspect ratios the ratio of the monitor and the shape of each pixel, called pixel aspect ratio. These two ...


14

The DPI of the image itself is not really that important. What is important is how big you will print the image and what kind of press/printer will be used to print it. This is why: DPI, dimensions and pixels The dimensions of an image can be specified in 2 different ways. Indicate DPI and dimensions in inches (or cm) Indicate dimensions in pixels (or ...


12

Not exactly, but... ... there is a way to achieve the effect you describe. Apparently you can change the scaling mode for smart objects, but it's a global setting that takes effect for newly created Smart Objects: Preferences > General > Image Interpolation. So the procedure is like this: Open your background image Set Preferences > General > Image ...


12

Millimeters, inches, centimeters, picas.. all do not translate universally to pixel sizes. Pixels are not a physical object, there's no measured size for a pixel. Physical measurements only relate to printed materials, never anything on screen. You need to ask your client if a pixel size is acceptable. Perhaps show him/her what 71mm would be at 72ppi (...


11

Designing a graphics for a header is not just designing the image, but knowing how the header will look overall. If you provide only the image, there is a chance the other person making the website put just a tini little version, or a deformed one for example. So the first step is to prepare a canvas simulating diferent screen devices, let's say: 1920 width,...


11

No this is not possible. To be entirely sure I went through every option that the layer has. A workaround might be setting up guides with the size you want the pixels to be and then using the Pencil tool to fill them.


11

No. I'd approach it one of these two ways: Use a multiplier for your pixel brush size, and just use nearest neighbour interpolation to resize your image to the correct size without deforming it. (let's say you had to blow up your pixel art 10x, just use a 10px square brush). You can always have a second view zoommed out to simulate the final size. ...


11

As I've previously said here and here... PPI is not an inherent property of an image. There is no such thing as a 300PPI image, or a 72PPI image. PPI is just a useful measurement for determining the print size of an image. Which means PPI is completely irrelevant unless accompanied by physical dimensions. If someone says "Can we have that image ...


10

You are talking about microprinting. The whole idea of that, is that you cannot reproduce it by using printers or printing presses. It is engraving that are designed to trip up professional counterfeiters. So, no, I can´t see how on earth it would be possible to pull off. (of course, if you have unlimited resources and good connections in shady parts of town ...


9

Preview is simply a terrible PDF viewer. It has many rendering issues with PDFs. Preview is designed by Apple to view PDFs for average home end-users. It is not designed to be a professional PDF viewer. Apple simply appears to not be concerned with many rendering issues in Preview where PDFs are concerned. What you are describing I'd actually call one of ...


8

For our printing partners, we almost exclusively submit PDFs for printing. Unfortunately, PDFs have dimension limits. It was around 5 meters (I Googled, it's 200 inches). So we scale down. We usually do it for those hoarding artworks -- hoardings are "panels" that you use to board up when you're constructing a new store inside a mall (or any building ...


7

Solution number 1: Draw a Marquee selection around the element; choose Edit → Copy Merged File → New; hit Return; “Paste.” now you have your element ready to be saved in png format Solution number 2: right click on the layer (or group of layers) choose to duplicate the layer (or group) choose New as a destination and you get a new document with your ...


7

Determining PPI Resolution given the Viewing Distance from the image For Raster (halftone screened) graphics, the PPI resolution is determined in two steps using only basic arithmetic. There's nothing mysterious. Step 1. Determine the necessary LPI (Lines Per Inch) A simple formula for the minimum acceptable LPI for viewing distance has been determined by ...


7

Photoshop does not treat 1px = 1 pt. Except at a specific situation. This is when the image is set to 72 ppi + you are using pt as a unit + you have the point/pica set to 72 pt/inch. The explanation is that if you set the ppi to 72, it matches the idea that you can have 72 points on each inch. You can see this in action changing this values in Photoshop (...


7

Scaling bitmaps is never without loss. Both upscaling, and downscaling will produce interpolation artifacts. This can be done much better with vector graphics. So if we can trace the bitmap we will get better results. Scaling artifacts become even more obvious when done on an indexed image. We can not calculate interpolated colors on downscaling an indexed ...


7

Edit: This answers only to the original question: What makes pixel art look better than simply low resolution images? Later edits of the question have changed the subject. Pixel art objects are created to be presented exactly with zero error on low resolution screens. Convert another image to the same low resolution and so much details can be lost that ...


6

I think Jan Steinman was close with his angular explanation. The DPI table is good as well but in the end it all comes down to pixels not DPI for photographic images. Forget DPI, a good rule of thumb is that across your field of view your eye can not see more than 8,000 pixels. Therefore you should not create a bitmap image of more than 8,000 pixels across. ...


6

The type of the display is not actually important. Any decent OS has options to set the screen resolution and/or font, icon and other GUI elements sizes. Here is simple example: It has been taken on my netbook with OpenSuse and 1024x600 display, far away from "retina display". I simply set the default UI font to DejaVu Sans 24 and switched on all "anti ...


6

While you can increase text size etc to magnify things before taking a screenshot Another option to try (on MacOSX) is to use the disability features to zoom the screen in before taking a screenshot. I haven't used a mac for over a year but I remember in 10.5 you could zoom in quite a lot and I think it stayed quite clear. I'm sure similar features are ...


6

If you're using a set amount of pixels, let's say 500 x 500, it won't matter whether you're using 300 ppi or 72 ppi because the amount pixels in the image would still be 500. If you wan't to lower the file size of your image you will either need to scale down the image or save the image in a lower quality format: Or use Save for Web as this can give you a ...


6

Printed medium works differently form screens. Screens have 3 color elements very close to each other. Each element is capable of different color intensities. Printers on the other hand produce dots of limited number of colors usually 4 colors, but can be more and have 3-4 mid tones or so. To show mid tones it has to spread the dots around. The end result is ...


6

There is no document ppi setting for illustrator. There is just a target setting for continious rasterisation. Neither illustrator nor indesign have a seting for the resolution of the document as it would be meaningless. Doing so would make no sense. The source of your your confusion is using pixels as a measure of distance. Both indesign and illustrator ...


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