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28

here is the technical answer Saying that the color is #dd0017 is meaningless, unless it is paired with information about what color space you are using! Therefore also conversion from #dd0017 to CMYK is meaningless. With this off our agenda we can start to look what same would mean in your scenario. When you talk about pure color like #dd0017 you are ...


18

The range of colors that can be reproduced in any CMYK-only color (known in the trade as "Process Color") printing method is considerably smaller than the sRGB range of colors reproducible on a standard monitor. Here is an excellent video that demonstrates this visually using 3D color models. It happens that one of the ranges of RGB color that can't be ...


17

A monitor can't show true CMYK. CMYK is reflective light, or subtractive color. A computer display is projected light, or additive color. They take up different (albeit overlapping) color spaces. Your software does its best to emulate the CMYK colors converting them to RGB but it simply can't replicate them exactly. "When ever I'm choosing color while ...


17

RGB is an additive spectrum... you ADD colors to get white. Dkuntz is correct stating that RGB is light-based. It is. It uses the visible light spectrum to display colors. CMYK is a subtractive spectrum... you REMOVE color to get white. DKuntz's use of the term "color-based theory" is really nonsensical. Since RGB is also a color spectrum. A more ...


14

Great question! To take the last part first, your skin hue would be the same no matter the brightness of incident light, provided the color of the light didn't change. That's why "Select skin tones" works in Photoshop CS6 and later. In broadcast video work, there's a commonly-used tool called a vectorscope that will prove to you, if you ever test it out, ...


14

NOTE: This got way longer than I expected, and I purposely glossed over a LOT of detail. If you'd like me to elaborate, just ask. PMS Colors - Absolutely brilliant when used as designed for pre-mixed spot color offset printing. You can be assured the color you saw in your Pantone book is very closely represented in your final printed piece. The problem is, ...


13

... if I try to assign a text the color #00FFFF it automatically sets it to #6FCCDC instead of converting it to CMYK. It is converting it to CMYK... CMYK and RGB have a different gamut, so converting from one to the other will result in color changes. The hexadecimal colors you have there are an RGB notation, so if that color doesn't exist in the CMYK ...


13

Set the tool's blend mode to Normal before painting with it.


13

As Billy Kerr wrote, Hex is not a colour space, but a numerical system such as the decimal system, but with base 16. The differences you notice are probably caused by different RGB colour spaces (such as sRGB vs. AdobeRGB), i. e. the RGB numbers from your graphic designer describe another colour than the mentioned online tool.


12

Not to detract from Marc's excellent and comprehensive answer, there are some points that are worth a bit more explanation. It's a big subject. This gets geeky before it gets better, so bear with me and follow closely. :) CMYK and RGB are "color models," not color profiles. A color model is a way to represent colors using numbers. There are other models, ...


11

Converting to CMYK won't help you unless you find CMYK specific paint, which I'm not sure exists. Commerical paint manufacturers use a variety of non-standardized ways of expressing colour - so try this web based converter: http://www.easyrgb.com This will convert your RGB to a paint colour. That's the free option. If you want to be really picky, you'll ...


11

I will only complement the other answers. RGB to HEX will give you the same exact color. RGBA to HEX, will not because we do not even know what is beneath the color. If you put another color the overall color will change... that is the whole point of transparency. So you have three options. Convert the RGB values to HEX (without the alpha value) and add ...


10

It's actually far simpler than it may first appear. The bottom line is that it's best to convert to the most native format as early as possible. Full colour printing typically uses four inks to create a photorealistic image. In theory, cyan, magenta and yellow should be enough to print a high quality image, but adding black aids the printing process, giving ...


10

Yes and no. Yes: It offers a smaller range of colors assuming that integers are required for each value. Photoshop, for example, requires HSB values to be integer and will yell at you if you try otherwise: However, your math seems to be off. You're on the right track with RGB: each value can be an integer from 0-255, so the RGB gamut consists of 256³ or ...


9

As per thebodzio's answer, there's plenty of ways to get that colour. No matter what browser you use there will be some sort of colour picker add-on you can get. Alternatively you could take a screen shot and open it in photoshop. Another way is to open developer tools and look at the sites stylesheet, in chrome you could right click the background and hit ...


8

There's a very important distinction between the document color modes many aren't aware of. When you open an RGB document color profile, all the swatches, symbols, brushes, etc are RGB items. When you open a CMYK document color profile, all the swatches, symbols, brushes, etc are CMYK items. When you switch Document Color Modes mid-stream, all those ...


8

Open the flyout menu in the Color panel and click on CMYK. The Color panel stays in whatever mode it started in, or is switched to. This doesn't affect the color mode of the document or the color; it's just a different way of describing the color. If you used RGB swatches in your document, you'll find that double-clicking on a swatch after switching to CMYK ...


8

The easiest way would be to create a selection around the bar code (I assume it's got the white background), then using the Channels Panel - Hightlight the black channel and use Levels to boost the tone to 100%. Then Highlight the C channel and fill the selection with white. Then fill the selection on the M and Y channels with white as well. Double check ...


8

Firstly, when you change color modes, you should use Photoshop's Edit->Convert to profile function. This will allow you to map the colors to the new profile in the least-obtrusive way. This should prevent the logo or other asset from noticeably changing colors. Secondly, the reason people do print designs in CMYK is precisely because it allows them to work ...


8

RGB is a color space that can only exist with projected light. It's physically impossible to replicate it on paper, which is a reflected light color space. So no, no printing press can 'print RGB'. At best, prepress RIP software can convert from RGB to CMYK. In fact, this is what most prepress software workflows do. How they convert to CMYK can vary ...


8

RGB and CMYK are two different colour spaces. RGB is meant to represent the colours that can be produced with light using Red, Green and Blue dots. CMYK is way more limited. It is meant to represent colours that can be created with ink, but not with any ink but specifically mixing Cyan, Magenta, Yellow and Black. The RGB space and the CMYK space have ...


8

This was confusing at first but the striving for information has led me to a clearer understanding. RGB vs CMYK There is clear discrepency between gradients in RGB and CMYK this becomes clearer when you realise the palettes used by each colour mode are drasitcally different. Colour consists of HUE, SATURATION and BRIGHNESS RGB RGB uses a single HUE ...


8

The title of the article 'Tauba Auerbach’s RGB Colorspace Atlas Depicts Every Color Imaginable' is misleading. As you already said RGB is intended for screen display and not print. It is - as far as I am aware - impossible to faithfully reproduce all RGB colors using offset printing. Even if it was possible to reproduce all RGB colors, no RGB color space ...


8

The design you describe would likely be printed using spot colors. One of the most popular spot color library is called the Pantone Matching System (PMS), if you're using Photoshop or Illustrator then the swatches are built right in to the application. However, there's no guaranteeing that your printer will use that library in house. The golden rule for ...


8

Matching colours between screen and print is a complex and sometimes impossible task. Due to the nature of light (Screens, RGB) versus ink (CMYK, Pantones, etc) and the fact that pretty much every monitor will display the colour slightly differently and print will look different in different lights. This kind of colour management is a job in itself. ...


7

It's not so much "how does the monitor display color" as "how does the software think it's displaying this particular color on this particular monitor." As they say on Facebook, "It's complicated." Color gets to your screen through layers of software called color profiles. A color profile takes the raw numbers and interprets them for display or for printing....


7

RGB is three dimensional, so to understand the problem it helps to visualise the RGB colour space as a three dimensional shape. A classic way is as a cube based on amounts of the three dimensions, red, green and blue: (images taken from Digital Color Design with the RGB Color Cube: Visualization and Color Coordination Activities, a journal article I ...


7

Although I never heard the term 'pastel colour space', it looks like you're talking about tints, tones and shades of a hue, in HSB colour space. The term you're looking for is shade. The pure hue has S(aturation) and B(rightness) each equal to 100%. Adding any amount of white reduces saturation, while keeping the brightness at 100%, yielding a tint of the ...


7

RGB color is for light-producing situations, and is additive, which means that you are adding light of one color to light of another color, resulting in more light and a mixed color. CMYK color is for light-absorbing situations, and is subtractive, which means that you are absorbing light instead of reflecting it, and mixing two pigments results in ...


7

RGB is an additive color model using light directly from its source before it is reflected off of an object. In essence, you start in darkness and because you are directly viewing the light source, the wavelengths can be added to each other to create colors. CMYK and 'real life colors' both use a subtractive method to display color. In essence, you begin ...


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