32

Of the original "web-safe" (that is, as close to universal as you'll get on the Web) sans-serifs (Arial, Impact, Tahoma, Trebuchet MS, Verdana), Verdana tends to get the most love. It's well-designed and is designed to be readable on the screen. It was designed by Matthew Carter, a respected typeface designer, and the design itself is pretty original, so it ...


25

I would suggest some standardized font such as German DIN 1451. This means you find many vendors for the same font and can even implement it on your own if needed for some proprietary system. Its also available in many different forms. Image 1: One of the available Din fonts Taking the same thinking further you can chose to use some other standardized font ...


25

One very nice (if you ask me) option is IBM’s new set of fonts called Plex. The family includes both a sans-serif, a serif, and a monospaced variant, all with excellent distinctiveness (1/I/l and O/0 are easily distinguished and it has both dotted and slashed alternates available for zero), and the entire family is free and open-source.* At the moment, only ...


13

It's not the same design, but League Gothic is a good free bold grotesque sans that may give you the feel you want.


12

Vernon Adams has a very nice alternative, named Anton: https://www.google.com/fonts/specimen/Anton As he said in other page: "see Google's PR for the Chromebook notebooks that used Anton, big and bright".


11

I'm going to go with Open Sans, since that's what Meatless is using for a lot of its text content: That's the "Extra Bold 800" weight. Default kerning is looser than what your source has.


11

Consolas comes installed with Windows as standard, so widely available, and has distinct 0 and 1 glyphs.


10

Your requirements are somewhat contradictory, potentially even mutually exclusive. You specify sans serif as a requirement, but the thing that distinguishes the similar characters in your example is the serifs. That said, there are probably some typefaces out there that would be a reasonable compromise. My first suggestion would be Anonymous Pro : https://...


8

Coda looks very similar to me, however it is much more vertically condensed. If you un-scrunch it, it looks much more similar: Try it out


7

It's definitely out of the Gill Sans family. It's closest to the Bold weight that I have locally. My guess is that there's some kind of manual alteration - it looks like it's horizontally squished a bit, and it could possibly be faux-bolded as well. However, there might be some bolder weight or condensed variant that I'm unaware of. Here's the glyphs I'm ...


7

According to Identifont, it appears to be a variant of Parisian, a classic Art Deco font from 1928: Comparing your image to the sample above, it looks like the font in your image has slightly sharper corners than most of the cuts of Parisian I could find, and lacks some of the subtle line thickness variation. Still, it's obviously a variant of the same ...


7

Most current fonts should have one. In Western European typography there is no dot on the upper case "I", but in Turkish, there are dotted and dotless "i"/"ı" whose uppercase versions are dotted and dottless "İ"/"I" that you should see here because your browser fonts likely support them. So it's not a matter of finding a font, but of using the adequate ...


7

Well the difficult part is the "free" aspect... I have several typefaces in my library that may meet most of your requirements: - Museo Sans - Bunday Sans - Source Sans I'm not certain Museo or Bunday are free.... However, I believe Source Sans is free, if it fits your needs. None have an easy slashed zero, but they all have a unicode symbol for the ...


6

A visual search in dafont's or Font Squirrel's sans-serif section one will probably give you better results. Fontscape has a section with long descenders, but they are paid fonts. These are some of the ones I found, they look very similar, but I'm sure you can find lots more if you do a search. Elegant Light: Thin Lines and Curves Mamma Gamma


6

That's just plain and simple Arial and Arial bold. A handy tool to identify fonts is WhatTheFont.


6

I'm almost positive that it's Open Sans. The "O" is less geometric than Proxima Nova, and the "Y" is exactly like the picture.


6

Please look at the NEUTRA family fonts, probably this family contains one of the fonts which is close to the font in the question. +


6

Quite often designers will pair serif and sans typefaces to create contrast between elements. Serif typefaces will be used for the main body of text because the serifs draw the eye and make reading large blocks of text much easier, whereas sans-serifs will be used, much like you described, for headings and figure descriptions etc. It helps the reader easily ...


6

This is just a simple font like Helvetica Bold Italic that's been hand edited. In my (very) rough version below I used that font, kerned it out to +115 and "created outlines" with shift+control+O Then I used the Convert Anchor Point tool shift+C to round the corner. Good luck!


5

Oswald is a good alternative too:


5

The best alternative I know of, that is free for commercial use is Bebas Neue.


5

Cannot see the fine details to be sure whether it's Helvetica or Helvetica Neue but I'm inclining to the latter.


5

I would consider the google-font "Oswald" It comes only in 3 weights and has no italic or oblique version, but reminds me of the Univers Condensed type. Try changing Oswald 1pt less than Univers, regular -> light and bold -> regular.. Last, change tracking to +50.. That should do the job.. :-).. http://www.google.com/fonts/specimen/Oswald


5

It started out as Handel Gothic Medium (the Linotype version), by the look of it, but the letterforms have been s-t-r-e-t-c-h-e-d horizontally (I hate that) and the M has been rounded for purposes of creating this wordmark. The stretching is what makes the vertical parts of the S, T and C, and the vertical strokes of the T, H and K too thick, so they're out ...


5

That is Estilo Script by DSType: http://www.dstype.com/fonts/estilo-script


5

Hard to tell at that size, but it looks like Gotham to me: http://www.typography.com/fonts/gotham/overview/


5

The word CAPITAL is probably written using font 'Eurostile'


5

As with most typographic terms, there's no single answer to this. So many different terms can go into describing any particular font and the definitions tend to have so much overlap that placing type into defined buckets can be a fruitless undertaking. Some terms that could apply to what you are looking for. Monoline The term monoline is used for ...


5

The font appears to be a modified version of GOVERNOR and I am basing that on the R and C:


5

Looks like Peignot Bold to me!


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