25

One very nice (if you ask me) option is IBM’s new set of fonts called Plex. The family includes both a sans-serif, a serif, and a monospaced variant, all with excellent distinctiveness (1/I/l and O/0 are easily distinguished and it has both dotted and slashed alternates available for zero), and the entire family is free and open-source.* At the moment, only ...


24

I would suggest some standardized font such as German DIN 1451. This means you find many vendors for the same font and can even implement it on your own if needed for some proprietary system. Its also available in many different forms. Image 1: One of the available Din fonts Taking the same thinking further you can chose to use some other standardized font ...


19

Vernon Adams has a very nice alternative, named Anton: https://www.google.com/fonts/specimen/Anton As he said in other page: "see Google's PR for the Chromebook notebooks that used Anton, big and bright".


11

I'm going to go with Open Sans, since that's what Meatless is using for a lot of its text content: That's the "Extra Bold 800" weight. Default kerning is looser than what your source has.


11

Consolas comes installed with Windows as standard, so widely available, and has distinct 0 and 1 glyphs.


10

Your requirements are somewhat contradictory, potentially even mutually exclusive. You specify sans serif as a requirement, but the thing that distinguishes the similar characters in your example is the serifs. That said, there are probably some typefaces out there that would be a reasonable compromise. My first suggestion would be Anonymous Pro : https://...


8

You're probably looking for a "glyphic" sans-serif, one with visible stroke contrast and with swellings at the terminals. I hugely recommend Heliotrope by Matthew Butterick. It's well-spaced and proportioned for body text, and has a fair price and a common-sense license. Canela from Commercial Type is more expensive, but the main styles come free ...


7

It's definitely out of the Gill Sans family. It's closest to the Bold weight that I have locally. My guess is that there's some kind of manual alteration - it looks like it's horizontally squished a bit, and it could possibly be faux-bolded as well. However, there might be some bolder weight or condensed variant that I'm unaware of. Here's the glyphs I'm ...


7

According to Identifont, it appears to be a variant of Parisian, a classic Art Deco font from 1928: Comparing your image to the sample above, it looks like the font in your image has slightly sharper corners than most of the cuts of Parisian I could find, and lacks some of the subtle line thickness variation. Still, it's obviously a variant of the same ...


7

Please look at the NEUTRA family fonts, probably this family contains one of the fonts which is close to the font in the question. +


7

Quite often designers will pair serif and sans typefaces to create contrast between elements. Serif typefaces will be used for the main body of text because the serifs draw the eye and make reading large blocks of text much easier, whereas sans-serifs will be used, much like you described, for headings and figure descriptions etc. It helps the reader easily ...


7

Most current fonts should have one. In Western European typography there is no dot on the upper case "I", but in Turkish, there are dotted and dotless "i"/"ı" whose uppercase versions are dotted and dottless "İ"/"I" that you should see here because your browser fonts likely support them. So it's not a matter of finding a font, but of using the adequate ...


7

Well the difficult part is the "free" aspect... I have several typefaces in my library that may meet most of your requirements: - Museo Sans - Bunday Sans - Source Sans I'm not certain Museo or Bunday are free.... However, I believe Source Sans is free, if it fits your needs. None have an easy slashed zero, but they all have a unicode symbol for the ...


6

I'm almost positive that it's Open Sans. The "O" is less geometric than Proxima Nova, and the "Y" is exactly like the picture.


6

Historically, the single storey a was the italics version, as it more emulated handwriting. Many geometric sans faces also adopted the single storey version. But there's no hard-and-fast rule one way or the other. Both are acceptable glyphs.


6

That you consider sans-serif hard to see is, alas, really just your opinion. Everyone has preferences, and designers can't possibly cater to everyone's individual preference. As such, they decide to do the best they can with what they have and hope they hit the broadest spectrum of users possible. As for sans-serif typefaces, we've been using them ...


6

Some simple google search gave me the Guidelines for using Noto, and in there you find: For an Arabic website that needs to use an UI font for UI elements, such as buttons and tabs, that have more strict vertical space. The design of Noto UI fonts are adjusted to be more vertically compact, a refinement made for user interface typography.


6

This is just a simple font like Helvetica Bold Italic that's been hand edited. In my (very) rough version below I used that font, kerned it out to +115 and "created outlines" with shift+control+O Then I used the Convert Anchor Point tool shift+C to round the corner. Good luck!


6

There's no law stating what font you can or can not use anywhere. You are free to use whatever font you want. If you wish to use a sans serif typeface, then by all means do so. That being said, books and items with a great deal of smaller text are traditionally set in a serif font for a reason, which may ultimately be more preference than science. Many ...


5

That is Estilo Script by DSType: http://www.dstype.com/fonts/estilo-script


5

Hard to tell at that size, but it looks like Gotham to me: http://www.typography.com/fonts/gotham/overview/


5

The word CAPITAL is probably written using font 'Eurostile'


5

As with most typographic terms, there's no single answer to this. So many different terms can go into describing any particular font and the definitions tend to have so much overlap that placing type into defined buckets can be a fruitless undertaking. Some terms that could apply to what you are looking for. Monoline The term monoline is used for ...


5

The font appears to be a modified version of GOVERNOR and I am basing that on the R and C:


5

Looks like Peignot Bold to me!


5

Comfortaa is a pretty close / similar alternative, if you don't mind the rounded ends, and it's free/open source. It's Comfortaa Regular in the example


5

This is Arkitech Light by Neogrey Creative. I found this using What Font is, a font search engine similar to WhatTheFont but it searches free fonts. Any time WhatTheFont can't identify a sample, it's a good indication that it's a free font.


5

I checked your screen capture out on http://www.myfonts.com/WhatTheFont/ When I used all the recognizable characters, it didn't find a match, but when I used only the "J", it found it right away. Try - Twentieth Century Pro Bold Italic Looks like a match to me, using the "playbox" on http://www.fonthaus.com/fonts/monotypeimaging/Twentieth-Century/...


5

Hack is libre/open source and is designed with unambiguous characters. It's meant for editing code on screen even at small font sizes, but label printing isn't exactly high-resolution so lends itself to something nice and clear. Monospacing that holds even when bold/oblique is also useful. Here's a sample from their own website:


5

I'm not 100% certain but I believe it is Segoe UI (Version 5.01), which a quick search shows that Windows 7 used for most of its UI. Windows User Experience Interaction Guidelines – Fonts Segoe UI - Version 5.01 Compare your screenshot... and the same typed out in in Segoe UI... The quality on your screenshot isn't great and I had to test it by typing ...


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