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Color Separation This is the process of taking the artwork and (for the lack of a better term) separating the colors to facilitate the creation of the individual printing plates. To show by example, here's a 3 color job: Your printer probably won't expect you to create the plates with the trim and registration marks†, but you can certainly help them out by ...


13

Does that mean the artist literally only used 9 different colors to create that piece and then they're each layered on in the screen printing process? That's exactly what it means! Screen printing is when the artist takes each pigment, and drags it across the image-imprinted screen, one at a time, layering the inks in a specific order to get their ...


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There are a couple of ways to do color separations for screen preparation in Illustrator. You're trying to do it the more complicated way, so I'll walk you through how I'd do that first. Let's start with a simple text object that has a fill and a stroke on top of a rectangle: The Long Way Step 1: BACK UP YOUR ORIGINAL ARTWORK! This process will make ...


9

It really depends upon the quality of product you are after, the desire for return customers and any online service or local provider. Be aware, there's no margin in T-shirts (you won't make any real money). Regardless of the shirt designs. Costs of shirts and printing will push production costs high and in order to compete with any other shirt vendor you ...


9

some great advise here but I wanted to add some other details from my experience. As @scott has pointed out there are some shops that offer sublimation which is not a great return in product and typically produces fading or bleeding of color after time. Its hard to make any money in apparel unless you are doing massive quantities or have a large order. ...


9

My answer applies to silkscreen printing only so make sure that's the kind of printing you are dealing with before using this information and also double check the specifics with your printer, better safe than sorry! What does it mean to colour separate the artwork in T-Shirt printing? Like in many printing methods, silkscreen printing prints one color at ...


8

Over the years I have developed a technique to simulate printing with glazing colors (screen printing, offset printing etc.) while working completely non-destructive, remaining full editability through the whole process and being able to easily export greyscale/bitmap masters for each color. Before we start we need to clarify what we want to do: We want ...


8

What does it mean to colour separate the artwork in T-Shirt printing? To color separate the artwork means the printer will typically isolate CMYK or the pantone colors for one plate/screen. This typically depends on the design and the printer. If you're printing a shirt with a DTG printer than separation is typically not needed unless printing on a black ...


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One of the biggest roadblocks with screen printing is the huge amount of setup involved to print just one design. To find a printer who will provide you with quality products, you will pay for the nose for small quantities. If you're willing to get your hands dirty (quite literally, it can be very messy), you can get some relatively inexpensive equipment to ...


6

If you are looking to avoid the fee there are open-source digitizing solutions such as SewArt but it uses raster based images. Be advised that free solutions typically result in poor quality digitizing files. Now just to make sure you understand the purpose of digitizing is to assign the color and path to the embroidery machine as so: That said I would ...


6

I've actually tried this. I worked from 2008-2010 as one of the primary Laser Technicians at the Gulfstream Center at Savannah College of Art and Design. I would operate and maintain the Laser for student work requests. I was asked on a few occasions to try this out on some pre-stretched screen. We ruined a few screens getting the technique down to ...


6

The effects that you are referencing are actually the result of printing errors / bad printing. The 'Postkarte' image shows signs of under inking. This was probably produced with a rubber stamp and the effect in the image is caused by the fact that the stamp is running low on ink, most likely because it has already been used to produce several impressions ...


5

You just need to tell Paint to keep the ratio when scaling. This is what my paint (Windows 8) looks like, but there should be a similar command in yours if your OS is different: If you need to work with images I suggest you download a copy of The Gimp. It's free, open source and quite easy to use. The same dialog as above in Gimp will look something like ...


4

You could try scanning it in at something ridiculously high like 600 dpi, then resizing it in Photoshop down to 300 dpi but keeping the same pixel count (in other words - scan it in at 600 dpi; you end up with something like 4960 X 7016 pixels. Resize it to 300 dpi, but keep the actual pixel size at 4960 x 7016. You will now have an image that's larger than ...


4

Make sure to look for the following: Shocks ease of flow from fully compressed and fully extended. Check the shock within the flood area. This is where you flood the screen with ink before you lay it down on the garment. Make sure the shock doesnt lock up or fall. Check the bolts on the clamps to make sure they aren't stripped. Test the clamp with a ...


4

Obviously you're limited by the equipment you have at your disposal, but have you considered CMYK screen printing? You will need a 4 color press with precise registration, but it is entirely possible to do: CMYK Screen Printing Consumer level wide format inkjet printers are available if you're looking to buy one, in my experience Epson is generally regarded ...


4

One easy way to wrap your head around this is to think in terms of INKS not in terms of COLOURS. Having worked a lot in print, this has become second nature, but if you spend a lot of time working digitally then it won't be quite as simple. The example you've given uses 9 different inks to create the design. That means that some areas will be screened over ...


3

In offset printing, the only time colors are going to appear "multiply" as on the example is when there's an overprint on some spot colors. One way to work with spot color easily is to use the channels in Photoshop and bring each part of the artwork on the specific channel. That's not as easy as working with layers when creating an artwork and playing ...


3

Do some research on the subject and its not that difficult to find this information. You need to get templates for the wraps either from online or a manufacturer. Your design starts with an accurate template of your vehicle — they are available from the manufacturer or online and are essential for creation of your design at the correct size. Most ...


3

There are far too many variables involved with burning the screen for anyone to give you an accurate answer. Burn time can depend on the type of emulsion, mesh count of the screen, exposure light, your film medium (transparency? paper & mineral oil? vellum?), and your exposure setup. The best way for you to find out is to test yourself. You say you don'...


3

What your printer told you is correct. Think of it like this: anywhere you see white in your image, you'll see shirt color instead. (Unless you pay for the addition of white ink, but with unfinished edges like you have there, it's not going to look great.) Here's an image to help visualize what printing this on different colored shirts might look like:


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You have a CMYK separation with a white base color for dark textiles. Every channel must be reticulated before printing or reticulated in a rip printer. The channels you are showing are just grayscaled separeated inks, where we see the amount of ink we must use in every silkscreen.


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You could use a halftone for the blurred image. As long as the dots are fairly large, and the bitmap is quite high resolution (like 300ppi or more), it should be good enough for screen printing. There's no need to make the halftone vector. Here's a quick example below: I blurred a black circle in Photoshop in greyscale mode, and then converted it to a ...


2

John has a great solution with Epson. Personally I run the Workforce 1100, if you watch Staples they go on sale every other year for 149.99. Last time I bought two. I also picked up BlackMax to print a plate for each CMYK. Do exactly what John's video recommends. In all I think I walked out with a couple hundred bucks in equipment. EDIT: video on ...


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My best guess would be to mix transparency into each color in proportion. Eventually you'll become better at knowing your inks and your papers, and your end result will look similar to your original. For example: In a design, you have a red square that is at 70% opacity and a blue circle that is at 20% opacity. You fill two cups, one with 100ml of your red ...


2

Expanding appearance or merging objects or outlining strokes and even separating colors to their own layers is completely unnecessary for the purposes of separations for screen printing. (Although, stacking art with different layers is good practice.) Assuming the screenprinting method will not be CMYK (a.k.a four color process), if you color each art ...


2

This would be a question for the printer. Depending on how the document needs to be setup they may require a certain amount of bleed for the black stroke. This bleed is usually cut off when they trim to the final size. I would suggest asking your printer what they prefer and what their protocol is for strokes on the edges. After edit: If this is to be ...


2

I'll try and answer best I can: It all depends on the humidity and the air circulation in the room, but in a somewhat standard room, I would estimate it would take anything from 4 to 8 hours for the emulsion to dry up, depending on how much you put on. You don't need a really thick coat either, and I recommend using a plastic paint scraper to take off the ...


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Yes 9 colors are used. Shades or tints of a color don't count as a separate color and additional colors can be created by overlapping two or more colors.


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Two possibilites how they achieved this look and feel: The foundation for the print (usually white) soaks in a lot of the color in the process. Then it was not a finishing step. They have used a matte UV top coat. Then it was a (well in case of UV: two) finishing step. But first to get a very high-quality print directly onto a blank disc you would have to ...


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