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31

Fonts like this are called glyphic serif. But since for example Optima is widely considered a sans serif, I don’t think it would be wrong to say the same for Marcellus. By the way: The German font classification system (DIN 16518) considers fonts like this to be Antiqua-Variants. Antiqua-fonts that can’t be classified clearly as serif or sans-serif go in ...


19

Spurs A small projection off of a main stroke. See #15 here. Although most explanations will use an uppercase G to show a sample, they are still spurs when protruding from a primary stroke of any glyph.


19

About the style, Tuscan Fonts Tuscans can be described as decorative display faces with characteristics that usually include one or more of the following: bi- or trifurcated (branched) serifs or mannered stroke terminations (pointed, rounded, concaved, chiseled, wedged…); an active, energetic contour; and medial decoration. Tuscans can also be additively ...


11

That would be Caslon540 I believe Caslon on WIKI, there are more than 65 variants of Caslon Typeface.


11

Using just the 'Top table' part of the image and skewing it a bit, WhatTheFont! gave either University Roman or Celtic MN as matches. University Roman Celtic MN


10

I know those as: ball terminals (references: 1, 2), teardrops or teardrop terminals (reference), The one on the top right of a binocular g is usually called ear, irrespective of its shape (references: 1, 2). You could describe your example g as having a teardrop ear, I suppose. Note that terminal is usually used in a much wider sense, including several ...


7

It could be Times New Roman Condensed Bold, a bit modified maybe. //EDIT: It actually is Times New Roman Condendsed Bold – with a horizontal scale of 79%. I compared the font not with the picture you posted (because the quality is so bad), but the Cover of the Neon Genesis Evangelion: S² Works. The A and the G is slightliy different, because I have the ...


7

And the winner is..... ATC Rosemary It checks out when you look at some of the other images on the Behance project page.


6

Probably Century font family or a similar one. Also looks like Corona font (http://cdnimg.fonts.net/CatalogImages/23/44530.png)


6

Quite often designers will pair serif and sans typefaces to create contrast between elements. Serif typefaces will be used for the main body of text because the serifs draw the eye and make reading large blocks of text much easier, whereas sans-serifs will be used, much like you described, for headings and figure descriptions etc. It helps the reader easily ...


5

I believe it's Classical Garamond Italic: Points of interest are the asymmetric bowl of q together with its top-right serif, the tails of u together with the slant at the top of its vertical, the terminals of s.


5

As with most typographic terms, there's no single answer to this. So many different terms can go into describing any particular font and the definitions tend to have so much overlap that placing type into defined buckets can be a fruitless undertaking. Some terms that could apply to what you are looking for. Monoline The term monoline is used for ...


5

Adobe Garamond Pro, with the tracking reduced to -25 and the horizontal scale set to about 80%


5

It's basically Courier: but produced on a fairly crude dot-matrix printer. The letter forms are a product of the way they are produced. MyFonts has a number of dot-matrix fonts and Vactic might be a reasonable alternative which is quite close, if you don't want to create your own:


5

Arsis was originally released in 1939 by Linotype, so probably it was a prototype for the font in question:


5

I consider it to be a serif font, the letters have very small serifs but they are there.


5

That you consider sans-serif hard to see is, alas, really just your opinion. Everyone has preferences, and designers can't possibly cater to everyone's individual preference. As such, they decide to do the best they can with what they have and hope they hit the broadest spectrum of users possible. As for sans-serif typefaces, we've been using them ...


5

That particular font is a custom font for Swire called "Swire Roman". I had a feeling that the font was customized; those rounded bottoms of the "W" are typical of how fonts are customized for brand logos. I did a search on Swire's site for PDFs, thinking maybe I'd get lucky and find brand guidelines. Haven't yet, but I did find this newsletter, which, ...


4

Looks like Pradell, image linked below, found via identifont


4

Display fonts are intended to be used for larger sizes. The spacing, thickness, serifs, etc are optimized to improve legibility in large displays and make the subtle differences in shapes easier to see. Both serif and sans-serif fonts may have display variants. Display fonts are commonly used for signage, posters, and other large print media. They are also ...


4

This looks like what you were looking for. JosefinSlab-Regular It is free for download here http://www.ffonts.net/Josefin-Slab-SemiBold.font.download


4

Looks like Waters Titling Pro Regular is a close match, if not the exact match:


4

You can find a lot of useful information and resources for designing diacritics here: When designing a latin-based typeface, how are diacritics handled? Specifically in this case The Diacritics Project. Which says: The basic form of diaeresis and umlaut are two dots. The symbol thus may be created of two dots same as the one above i, placed in the same ...


3

Very confident it is Clarendon Light based on the width of the letters. Clarendon Light


3

Thanks to WhatTheFont.com, it looks like it is the Onyx typeface.


3

I'd say Decima Light: http://www.myfonts.com/fonts/tipografiaramis/decima/light/ I just used the font search: http://www.myfonts.com/WhatTheFont/


3

It looks similar to Minerva Modern Bold with some (quite a few) modifications: Other similar fonts include Optima Demi-bold and URW Classico. Edit: user Ilmari Karonen in the comments just pointed out this font, Serif Gothic Bold, which looks very similar apart from the stroke emphasis: Maybe you can combine the shape of the top one and the serifs and ...


3

The font is Computer Modern (Wikipedia), an original design of Donald E. Knuth for use with his TeX typesetting system. It's the default font in every TeX environment set-up, and it has an extensive set of matching Math symbols, so it's still being used extensively in scientific publications. It is classified as a modern Didone: Straight (hairline) ...


3

To expand on joojaa's answer... Right-Click or CTRL + Click on your text and Create Outlines Then, you want to offset your path Play with your settings I've colored my result in yellow, so you can see the newly created objects Delete the paths that you no longer want For future reference, this site works more as an "I've tried _____ and I'm having ...


3

I would say the following are a great bet for content set in serif font: Lora // https://fonts.google.com/specimen/Lora Source Serif Pro Roboto Slab


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