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6

I'd say things like this are better done with automation. Imagine width of one of the items in the middle of your collection changes and you'll have to rebuild half of the circles. Or you need to make all the circles 50% more wide. Oh man! I don't know Illustrator scripting, but in Photoshop it's quite straightforward. Basically I have a data array with ...


4

As you probably have guessed and at least one long time member has confirmed, Inkscape can be used to make also geometry illustrations. But you have no easy way to input formulas for wanted 3D shapes which you want to see rendered as 2D drawings. Only XY plane shapes can be inputted as parametric curves. Images of 3D compositions must be drawn manually or ...


3

It's unfortunate that you hadn't begun your project in Illustrator. Photoshop just isn't the right kind of software for work like this since the output would be raster, not vector. I suppose you could start over again. As Scott has said, short of finding (or writing) a script, neither Illustrator nor Photoshop has any automated way of scaling concentric ...


3

If you want to avoid drawing it, you can make a boolean difference of two different ellipses. In Illustrator that's one of the functions in the pathfinder panel. In Inkscape it's Path > Difference: The reddish top ellipse is half transparent to show the bottom ellipse. It also can be a single arc with variable width. Illustrator has the Width tool for it ...


2

With Illustrator.... I would merely draw a path with the Pen Tool, set it to have a thick stroke, and use a Stroke Profile to narrow the ends. You only need one path with a curve to it. Then, simply by changing the Stroke Weight you can alter how thick/thin the highlight is.... Then, if you need it as a shape rather than a stroke -- Select it, and choose ...


2

It's not clear why you want to place a certain non-fitting triangle and not to make a new exactly fitting or edit the bigger shape to the wanted form. But that's not the question. For an answer see the next image: The green shape must be deformed and placed to fit. Let's assume its sides must continue the the sides of the blue shape and it must fit ...


2

Select all Align on center vertically Align on center horizontally Of course this won't alter the diameter of the circles. If you want equidistant between each circle, then you need to use diameters that are the proper sizes. In that case.... it may honestly be easier to start over. See here.


2

Do you have to use badges? Because an Exclamation point doesn't remind me of a claim being completed. That reminds me of an important notice. Depending on the application, I think a checkmark next to each word "Claimed" and "Verified" would make it more clear. Another idea is to use a greyed out icon and then it turns green when done.


1

I think my trouble with this concept is that the shapes are so generic / arbitrary seeming that I don't gestalt read "Claimed & Verified" as being a combination of the two earlier statuses - I can understand it as a design concept ex post facto, but it doesn't immediately leap to the fore when simply viewing these. I would, I think, apply some of the ...


1

Select the O Choose Object > Compound path > Release from the menu Both shapes are then standard shapes.. fill them however you'd like.


1

If you don't want the stars to rotate as they go around the circle, you can create a Scatter Brush like this, and apply it to a circle.


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