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6

Precise isometric view Select Container Frame Copy height to clipboard Set Rotation Angle to -30 Set Shear X Angle to 30 Select Content Frame Paste in the height from before Fit frame to content Eyeballed axonometric view Select the Content Frame Rotate it to your liking Select the Container Frame Scale the height to your liking


5

Technically speaking, Illustrator calls these objects, which can be single objects or groups of objects (which are also considered objects). That is why you have an 'Object' menu in the main navigation, and not a 'Shape' menu. That is also why all the documentation includes the term 'object' in page slugs, not 'shape'.


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Depending upon what you're after specifically, you could also merely set a Stroke Profile for the stroke on the Stroke Panel.


5

There are probably many ways this could be done. Others have mentioned the width tool, a predefined brush, using two circles, etc. Another method is to make a custom Art Brush yourself. With the Pen tool, draw a shape like this: Then click and drag it into the Brushes panel, and choose the option to make an Art Brush. Next, draw a circle, add an anchor ...


4

Add a fill to the character via the Appearance Panel Set the fill to be a gradient of your two color Rotate the gradient 90° so its horizontal Select each color stop of the gradient and set the Location to 50%. Add the stroke as desired Note you don't have to use 50% for the gradient stop location, but both stops need to be in the same location. If you want ...


4

It's hard to see how this was achieved exactly dus to the low resolution of the image, but there is a couple ways to get a similar effect. With a brush Less exact control, more natural-looking effect. Draw a circle. Get out the Brushes palette: Window > Brushes or F5>. Open the palette options for thus Brushes palette (the icon with four lines and a ...


4

Everything is an object. Regardless of what it is visually - a line, a circle, a rectangle, type.... all objects. Shapes are Shapes - circles, rectangles, polygons, etc. Think of it similar to type.. you can have a word, a sentence, a paragraph.. but it's all type. This is similar - you can have a circle, a square, a path.... but they are all objects.


3

Although the answers say all things are objects and shapes are certain objects, one does have to be a bit careful. See natural language is not that specific. Programming modeling is, but don't mix it with natural languages or your own mental modeling. For spoken language, a shape and an object are probably exchangeably the same thing for most people ...


3

For parallel projection only, no other perspectives: Apply Object > Transform > Shear. Then Scale and rotate with the normal selection tool for good apparent proportions. You can also find good numerical values for shearing, scale and rotate. InDesign remembers numerical values for repeated work. An example of the result: Here the shearing is horizontal ...


3

Yes, you certainly can! It's called a vector mask, when you use a path as the mask. Draw a vector path with the pen tool, and click Layer > Vector Mask > Current Path Example: Or If you already have a vector shape on its own layer, put the image on a layer above and Alt/Option+click between the two layers to clip the image to the shape below. Example:


2

Have 2 filled circles with slightly different diameters. Subtract (=Pathfinder panel minus) the smaller from the bigger: Stretching one of the circles a little to make it elliptic creates more variation possibilities: But technically these are not strokes, they are filled paths. If that's a problem do as already suggested by others: use stroke width tool ...


2

Try Inkscape. It has in its Path menu effect "Dynamic Offset". You drag one handle which moves the edge outwards or inwards. Apply that effect to a duplicate of your closed path. Limitation: You have no control how much sharp corners will be rounded. Many fonts like your A will be virtually destroyed, it's not the same font any more. Better result is ...


2

Go into outline mode via CTRL+Y. Hit A for Direct Selection Tool. Click that line in the middle and hit DEL. Repeat if you can still see it, as you probably have that line 2 times, from both shapes. Second time you do this, it should probably go away. Exit outline mode via CTRL+Y.


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With Gimp: Method #1: Select>From path Select>Shrink Select>To path Method #2: Create new transparent layer, and Edit>Stroke path (line mode, twice the offset that you need) Layer>Transparency>Alpha to selection Select>To path Delete the outer stroke Comparison: black: initial path blue: method #1 red: method #2 Results are similar, method #2 is ...


1

The green line vanishes as soon as nothing is selected. I guess your problem is the unwanted horizontal white border between yellow and red. Solve the case by building your shapes differently: You need a base color version (=yellow) with no stroke, an extra color piece with no stroke and a stroke-only version. In the right you see how they are stacked. In ...


1

Yes, that's called a mask. You have a layer with the glitter image, another layer with the vector shape, and with these you can create a mask: https://helpx.adobe.com/photoshop/using/masking-layers.html https://youtu.be/Y1I9ahx_hYs?t=203


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Convert your connecting path to a shape (Object > Expand, check "Stroke") then you can use the Smart Guides (⌘+U) or View > Snap To Point and drag the anchors until everything snaps. Then you can select all objects and use the boolean operation Add to join the shapes.


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Note: Following works only if m and n are strokes, not shapes (I would recommend not expanding your m and n objects if they were strokes initially, as it will help you design better. Later you can expand.). There's a Control + J command in Illustrator. I think that can give you the result you want. a) With selection tool, select (highlighted by rectangle) ...


1

Adobe XD is not the best tool when it comes to drawing custom shapes. Once you drag an anchor point from a rectangle you lose the ability to adjust the corner radius. What you can do is to draw a rectangle, drag the anchors until you get a trapezoid and add a border with the same color as the fill. Set Outer Stroke and Round Join. You control the corner ...


1

Instead of actually outlining the path, use an outline Effect. This allows for non destructive outlining keeping your text editable. Select the text, then go to Effect → Path → Outline Object this will simulate the text as outlined and can then be aligned properly. Below, I aligned both to the circle, in the second case I first applied the outline effect. ...


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