17

I think you are on the right track already with your character. You just need more definition in order to relay the emotion or personality. See the brown marks I added. Simply adding facial definition & detail will help bring out the "evil" in the character. Note how the eyebrows protrude a bit more now. More wrinkles at the bridge of the nose makes ...


16

Inkscape comes with a variety of effect filters we can apply to our drawings. Amongst the many there are some effects to simulate hand-drawings. We can apply these filter with the menu Filters > Textures > Name of effect to all selected objects. Below are some example effects:


12

Consider reducing the size of the head. It is out of proportion to the body. If you look at most cute and cuddly cartoon characters, their features are exaggerated to make them look more cute. Most cute characters have overly large heads and eyes…mimicking a baby's appearance. In this case, your characters does not look cute, however the fact that your ...


11

In the context of wireframing, I don't know that there's a simple way to do this in Inkscape, as Inkscape doesn't have the concept of 'brushes' that something like Adobe Illustrator has (making this rather easy to do). What I have done, however, is made my own 'sketchy' objects just for wireframing. The process was essentially drawing a few UI Primitives (...


11

In my opinion Moleskine are more looks and brand than quality. Not that I think they are bad, I personally like them but I've had better quality as well. I don't think this is necessarily a bad thing though, as 'pretty things' help me get inspired. I would grab my beloved, nice looking notebook much quicker than an old drab. Next to this I also like that ...


8

Illustrator ships with several nice brushes. If you choose Open Brush Library > Artistic > Artistic_ChalkCharcoalPencil from the Brush Panel menu, several pencil-like brushes will load. From there, using a brush to draw whatever it is you want and applying one of the brushes should give you a pencil-like line. If you are working with existing shapes, you ...


7

Paper, qualities and types, is a rabbit-hole that is very deep. Be warned. A high quality coated paper designed for ink-jet printers would take inks very well to reduce or eliminate the possibility of smearing while still keeping the lines crisp. Uncoated paper would absorb inks very well also, but would tend to bleed at the edges. Heavier paper in general ...


7

Get a nature journal and spend a few weeks making a go at it. Small things are good so you can focus on the basics of observation and not get overwhelmed by the subject. You'll make lots of mistakes but don't criticize too early. Just draw. A lot. And draw everything you see. Any sketchbook that seems convenient will work. I like Moleskine's Cahier books ...


6

Here is the full Tutorial It's easier to see when you take the frames apart and then it becomes apparent that the line tickness and placement are randomized. There are a range of filters you could use, especially in Illustrator. There are in fact ten frames, I've only uploaded three...Then, slowing down the animation, to one frame per second, so you can ...


6

A quick check on Jony Ive shows that he was born in 1967, and he studied, among other things Industrial Design. While CAD was a thing in and around 1986, he most likely learned the bulk of his trade at the time using technical pens, mechanical pencils etc. The image you provided has all the hallmarks of technical drawing, but also looks to be worked up with ...


6

I would call this a character wireframe. Googling for that term gives images like this: These are often used in "How to draw X" tutorials.


6

Never discard sketches. They may contain ideas and inspiration for other projects or even later versions of the same project. At the very least, you can reflect on them later and be inspired for new work. They can also serve to illustrate a point when presenting your work. For example, if a certain shape or other decision seems a very obvious obvious choice ...


5

Your drawings are very good! In a digital world, illustrations that possess some humanity (like yours) are unfortunately rare. Digital drawing tablets are fantastic for many uses but they do still have a certain quality that is distinct from hand made art. I like using physical media. For line drawings and shapes that need to have some organic ...


4

If you're happy with the pens you use and simply want to avoid sweaty-hand related smudging, you might have a use for those 'smudge guard' gloves they make for use with graphics tablets. They're designed to stop hand smudges without getting in the way of using a pen, and I don't see any reason why they wouldn't work as well for real pens as for digital ones....


4

Definitely start with just a pencil and drawing pad. You don't want to spend money on an expensive tablet just to find out you don't like it and won't stick with it. That said, it depends on what your goals are, but drawing from life is the best way to understand whatever it is your trying to draw. If you just want to get better at drawing objects in ...


4

The links you provide are are illustrating exaggeration, not gesture drawing per se. Gesture drawing "proper" is an attempt to get at the essence of a pose without falling to nitpicking details. It is a good exercise only insomuch as it trains you to develop a context and a framework for the further detail you will inevitably bring later on. The problem ...


4

This could be done by creating a GIF in Adobe Fireworks. Add the first image. Add the same image to the second frame, but take some of the anchor points and move them. The more anchor points you move and the further you move them - the more the animation will wobble.


4

Some of the more "obscure" drawing apps offer this sort of feature. These do, and in personal order of preference // with commentary: ibisPaint // Funky, dated UI hiding VERY good performance and features. Good use of pressure in Pencil, too. MediBang Paint // Busy UI, but ENORMOUS feature list. Incredible Power, like a desktop app on an iPad. Concepts //...


4

There are no rules here. Conventional reading would tell you not to stack glyphs mid-word. But that's for reading. Reading a logo is not always the primary goal. If a logo is designed to contain some visual interest, sacrificing readability can be acceptable at times. This is even more true if the divergence conveys the word more through iconography than ...


3

Go to the master! :D The vitruvian man by da Vinci is well worth studying. And I mean; spend time looking at it: There is of course the classic artists mannequin, that you can buy in all sorts of places; sometimes even toy shops: Any search for human proportions or artists model would give you massive amounts of a technical approach: I would like to point ...


3

Henrik's answer is a good method of actually achieving this, but for pure interest, I thought I would put a little information regarding Squigglevision which is, believ it or not, patented by the people who did the "Home Movies" tv show. Squigglevision Patent As best as I can tell, they make a drawing, then they trace the drawing with something that ...


3

There are good sketching apps for tablets, like Sketchbook and Ideas. Even Wacom has Bamboo Paper for Android and iOS, but there's currently no off-the-shelf way to connect a Wacom tablet directly to a mobile device. Samsung demoed a Wacom pen-enabled Tab at Adobe MAX, and the Samsung Note is already on the market, with the Galaxy Note 10.1 scheduled for ...


3

I have a graphic and product design studio, for me what i can say is that the best you can do is practicing every single day. Time you spend doing things is when you gain your skills, buy a bunch of pencils and a paper block, and follow this guy here: http://www.youtube.com/user/sketchadaydotcom/videos there are some great videos about how to draw basic ...


3

I'd say 1000 is enough, it's very bright actually. It's similar to normal daylight and that's what is usually recommended for graphic design on computers as well. You can go a bit lower for your own comfort and depending on the style of drawing you do; your eyes are probably the best calibrating tool to evaluate contrasts and colors. Unlike working on ...


3

There is no definite line between something being a sketch and being a drawing. A drawing is generally considered to be a sketch if it is to be used to create another piece. Usually a sketch is rougher, with less detail than the finished piece. Only you can decide if it's still a sketch. Being a sketch doesn't make something less worthy as a piece of art. ...


3

Beauty is in the eyes of the beholder. Weird? Maybe that's the effect you are striving for. Consider how you felt the first time you saw Toys "R" Us with the R flopped and emphasized with quotation and bold colours. Weird? Maybe. Memorable? Most definitely. Mission accomplished. The idea behind the logotype (logo) is to identify the entity in a unique and ...


2

I haven't used any video tutorials for drawing, but there are a lot of good texts such as those by Andrew Loomis. And then there's always taking a figure drawing class at the local community college. However, one video tutorial series I've been considering purchasing is The Structure of Man HD by Riven Phoenix. He also has a lot of other video series (most ...


2

You have to revise the proportions. Google for the proportions comparison of a grown-up and child - the most pronounced difference is the size of the head. Reduce it - after all brute characters are rarely smart ;-)


2

You don't mention what tablet you want to do this on, but as far as IOS and Android go, I'm pretty sure there is nothing available that will handle all your requirements set out above. However, if you wait until June, Adobe will launch a pen and ruler that will work with most apps and should deliver what you need. You can see theme here... http://blogs....


2

I found it disconcerting that some here are claiming gesture is only useful for caricature and not professional, fine art or rendering. Nothing could be further from the truth. You are learning figure drawing. Go to a college or institution, begin figure drawing classes. They will all begin with gesture. Gesture is about capturing the action, defining ...


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