20

Inkscape comes with a variety of effect filters we can apply to our drawings. Amongst the many there are some effects to simulate hand-drawings. We can apply these filter with the menu Filters > Textures > Name of effect to all selected objects. Below are some example effects:


15

In the context of wireframing, I don't know that there's a simple way to do this in Inkscape, as Inkscape doesn't have the concept of 'brushes' that something like Adobe Illustrator has (making this rather easy to do). What I have done, however, is made my own 'sketchy' objects just for wireframing. The process was essentially drawing a few UI Primitives (...


11

In my opinion Moleskine are more looks and brand than quality. Not that I think they are bad, I personally like them but I've had better quality as well. I don't think this is necessarily a bad thing though, as 'pretty things' help me get inspired. I would grab my beloved, nice looking notebook much quicker than an old drab. Next to this I also like that ...


8

Clients are NOT generally entitled to source files or design drafts unless you agreed to that in a contract. Do you have a contract or terms of business? What does it say? If it's unclear, seek legal advice. Source files are somewhat analogous to a secret sauce recipe. They basically contain your trade secrets or intellectual property, i.e. information on ...


6

A quick check on Jony Ive shows that he was born in 1967, and he studied, among other things Industrial Design. While CAD was a thing in and around 1986, he most likely learned the bulk of his trade at the time using technical pens, mechanical pencils etc. The image you provided has all the hallmarks of technical drawing, but also looks to be worked up with ...


6

Here is the full Tutorial It's easier to see when you take the frames apart and then it becomes apparent that the line tickness and placement are randomized. There are a range of filters you could use, especially in Illustrator. There are in fact ten frames, I've only uploaded three...Then, slowing down the animation, to one frame per second, so you can ...


6

I would call this a character wireframe. Googling for that term gives images like this: These are often used in "How to draw X" tutorials.


6

Never discard sketches. They may contain ideas and inspiration for other projects or even later versions of the same project. At the very least, you can reflect on them later and be inspired for new work. They can also serve to illustrate a point when presenting your work. For example, if a certain shape or other decision seems a very obvious obvious choice ...


5

Your drawings are very good! In a digital world, illustrations that possess some humanity (like yours) are unfortunately rare. Digital drawing tablets are fantastic for many uses but they do still have a certain quality that is distinct from hand made art. I like using physical media. For line drawings and shapes that need to have some organic personality, I ...


4

This could be done by creating a GIF in Adobe Fireworks. Add the first image. Add the same image to the second frame, but take some of the anchor points and move them. The more anchor points you move and the further you move them - the more the animation will wobble.


4

Some of the more "obscure" drawing apps offer this sort of feature. These do, and in personal order of preference // with commentary: ibisPaint // Funky, dated UI hiding VERY good performance and features. Good use of pressure in Pencil, too. MediBang Paint // Busy UI, but ENORMOUS feature list. Incredible Power, like a desktop app on an iPad. Concepts //...


4

There are no rules here. Conventional reading would tell you not to stack glyphs mid-word. But that's for reading. Reading a logo is not always the primary goal. If a logo is designed to contain some visual interest, sacrificing readability can be acceptable at times. This is even more true if the divergence conveys the word more through iconography than ...


4

One needs to clarify the usage and intent.... If you merely look at a photograph and draw based on what you see, there's rarely any infringement. Using reference is exceptionally common and almost mandatory at times. I mean, there's no way I can travel to Giza to personally look at the pyramids in order to draw them. There's no way I could travel the south ...


3

Go to the master! :D The vitruvian man by da Vinci is well worth studying. And I mean; spend time looking at it: There is of course the classic artists mannequin, that you can buy in all sorts of places; sometimes even toy shops: Any search for human proportions or artists model would give you massive amounts of a technical approach: I would like to point ...


3

I'd say 1000 is enough, it's very bright actually. It's similar to normal daylight and that's what is usually recommended for graphic design on computers as well. You can go a bit lower for your own comfort and depending on the style of drawing you do; your eyes are probably the best calibrating tool to evaluate contrasts and colors. Unlike working on ...


3

Henrik's answer is a good method of actually achieving this, but for pure interest, I thought I would put a little information regarding Squigglevision which is, believ it or not, patented by the people who did the "Home Movies" tv show. Squigglevision Patent As best as I can tell, they make a drawing, then they trace the drawing with something that ...


3

There is no definite line between something being a sketch and being a drawing. A drawing is generally considered to be a sketch if it is to be used to create another piece. Usually a sketch is rougher, with less detail than the finished piece. Only you can decide if it's still a sketch. Being a sketch doesn't make something less worthy as a piece of art. ...


3

Beauty is in the eyes of the beholder. Weird? Maybe that's the effect you are striving for. Consider how you felt the first time you saw Toys "R" Us with the R flopped and emphasized with quotation and bold colours. Weird? Maybe. Memorable? Most definitely. Mission accomplished. The idea behind the logotype (logo) is to identify the entity in a unique and ...


2

I found it disconcerting that some here are claiming gesture is only useful for caricature and not professional, fine art or rendering. Nothing could be further from the truth. You are learning figure drawing. Go to a college or institution, begin figure drawing classes. They will all begin with gesture. Gesture is about capturing the action, defining ...


2

I saw a "UI kit" a week ago that had several Balsamiq'y looking elements. If I find it, I'll post; but here are several that are much-more-refined than Balsamiq. (Balsamiq is much faster IMO; there's no temptation to enhance the fidelity) "Wireframe Kits" https://ui8.net/categories/wireframe-kits


2

I will cheat and give you some links for you to study. Inkscape: realistic lighting and shading How can I make a shape look like it is made of glass? Prototype Visualization: How can I learn to render glass convincingly? What you will notice and learn is that a glossy material has its looks for what is what they are reflecting, not what the material is ...


2

In the past we wanted to make some markings to papers, but wanted to avoid the markings to be copied in a photocopier. Light blue or light green pen solved it, because they obviously reflected the copier light as well as a normal white paper. As well, if the markings were wanted to be surely copied, one had to use red or black pen. Note: In daylight we ...


2

Non-Repro Blue, Copy-Not, Non-Photo blue referred to their inability to be reproduced by Ortho-chromatic copy film. It shows clearly with Panchromatic materials but not with Blue-sensitive "ortho." Ortho is blue-sensitive. They used to be used on "Mark-up" notes on mechanical separations and reproductions which were all made on high-contrast ortho-chromatic ...


2

There's a textile dust overlay image (or more likely a fill pattern made of a dust photo), a grey background and the written paper is a separate layer with a drop shadow. It's between the grey background and the dust overlay. If you watch carefully, you can see the dust pattern is the same on both pages, only shifted and it's repeated even in one page. That ...


2

Boys. Plural. So if you're going to do drawings of heads or hats, or anything else representative of people, it needs to be 2 of them. Magnifying glass is wrong for social media marketing. It's micro, whereas social media marketing is macro. Pen nib is wrong. Too narrow. The hats ideas show most promise, and are the best analogy, because a social media ...


2

Google Maps offers a very extensive API for style customisation. You can customise almost any element. This is done through a Javascript API: the styles are saved in a JSON structure and then applied when the map is loaded in your website. You can find the full documentation here. But Google also offers a Wizard which lets you control almost all of the ...


2

I detest these issues, but they can arise from time to time. It's even worse when a client has turned sour for some reason and are just being ridiculously demanding and unrealistic. The first thing I realize is that the client is upset for some reason, which means they are of a mindset to just get "everything" without any considerations towards me. ...


1

That can simply be drawn in illustrator. I think most of it can be made with the shape tools: circles and rectangles. Start with the big circle. Make a part for 1 side, copy and paste it, use reflect horizontal and move it to the other side. Use align tops to get them at the same height. Most of these shapes have the same fill and stroke (outline color and ...


1

Sorry for the radio silence, crazy deadline. What I meant was this: starting from the vector image in Illustrator. (For this, I rebuilt it very quickly.) I created swatches for your two colors, but you can use pantone colors if you wish. With an object selected, click and drag the color from the box at the top left corner into the swatches palette. I ...


1

Well, you do not need that much high resolution. A. The scale, depending on what you want. If you need presicion on the proportions, it is better to draw at a larger scale. If you want a lot of detail, larger scale. If you want the texture of the technique (paper, stroke) you can draw at smaller scale. A natural look, draw at the final scale. If it is a ...


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