23

I've been an Adobe Certified Expert for approximately 9 years as of this writing. If working a 9 to 5 employment position, the certification isn't going to be of any great benefit. In fact, as an employee there's practically zero benefit to any Adobe certification other than merely continued education for self fulfillment. Your employer may be able to ...


14

So it seems to me like you've spotted someone who has great potential, but that potential is not currently fitting your needs completely and you need to partly delegate his training. I can understand the wish to keep this person if they can do all you claim they can, they are a rare find! You say there is no rush and you can invest in resources. That's ...


12

I was recently involved in helping to recruit a new designer and I was asked to design the part of the interview that would test for the right kind of practical creative thinking. "Interpret this brief" tests What I went with - which seemed to work quite well and got very useful results - was to: Give each candidate a plausible, basic design brief ...


10

I think you're asking about niche sub-fields with in the world of graphic design? Off the top of my head: Typeface designer (it's an incredibly small industry, albeit one that doesn't make many people rich) Calligraphers (historically for documents, wedding invites; today they tend to be hired for custom hand lettering for a wide range of uses) hand ...


8

I see web design as a subset of graphic design and not always a separate entity so I struggle a bit with the "vs." aspect of the question edit. One can certainly only be a web designer. I'm just not sure focusing so directly on one area makes that person a "graphic" designer. Much the same way one can be a fantastic package designer, but may not really have ...


8

The answer may lie in the difference between formative and summative assessment — the kind of feedback your employee requires to advance. Note: In the pedagogical feedback theory suggested below, substitute "your employee" for student and "acceptable/appropriate designer" for instructor. Formative assessment The goal of formative assessment is to monitor ...


7

There's an old advertising classic that is really important for anyone trying to tap into their nascent creativity: James Young's A Technique for Producing Ideas I've mentioned it elsewhere, but I'll hit the high points of Young's approach here. Gather raw materials: Flood your brain with the subject at hand. Digest the material: Study what you've found ...


7

This is a bit of a how long is a piece of string, but @GraphicsRPS has some good points. Personally, I am a fan of the Newtonian method: get away from the computer, go sit under a fruit tree. I think what is helpful, is not trying to bang your head against this, it will probably only create more frustration. What I believe in is looking, doodling, collect ...


7

Normally when you hire somebody it is to delegate some tasks so you don't need to get involved in everything personally. Now as this designer is clearly a junior, as energetic as he may be, this takes you back to spending time on tasks you meant to delegate. Hiring 1-2 more juniors can be an option and then filtering out the ones that don't make the goal or ...


6

It's important if you tend to do a lot of contract-based production work. Lots of IT/GD staffing agencies will want these types of certifications for filling production artist positions. Beyond that, though, unless you want to do it for your own personal reasons, it's not going to net you any real benefits. Bottom line, it's important if you lean (or want ...


6

The recruiters in Sydney sometimes find it hard to find good packaging designers - with high level press/ink knowledge. Often niche requirements (to get selected) you will have to need alot of experience to stand out. Being really good in a specific area, such as Fashion or FMCG or corporate branding - recruiters and job advertisers can be very specific for ...


6

It certainly can't hurt. If you are in a lull and have free time, why not expand your skills? Here is my story and reason for saying "Go for it." I started much like you--design only. I went to an aeronautical university, so I am by no means a trained designer, but I have always played around with Photoshop for fun. This led to me applying to a graphic ...


6

Traditionally, no. Animation has a long history and was not considered graphic design, much like say film or TV production. However, mediums are merging. There is no longer a huge technical and financial gap between the different mediums. The web forces the graphic designer to think of even animation, since the medium allows it. So yes it has become one of ...


5

For a recent job opening, we were looking for a web designer. A lot of resumes we were seeing were print focused, lots of Adobe experience, and maybe they took a web class a year ago. The test I created was to ask candidates to live write a simple product prototype. Header, nav bar, 25% left column with secondary nav. I didn't care what tools or frameworks ...


5

Like coding, graphic design is really about creative thinking and problem solving. Also like coding, any test you could give likely emphasizes implementation skills more so than creative thinking. IMHO, these types of tests check for the understanding of particular code syntax or a particular piece of software...both skills that are easy to learn, so ...


5

Play in Photoshop. Make lots of mistakes and try out lots of designs quickly. Don't worry if they don't turn out the way you want. Finish them and move onto the next. The only person who has to see them is you. Judge them against designers work that you like and try to figure out what they did to take it the extra mile. Find the designers you like on ...


5

The internet is usually my source for Creativity, but also reflection out in nature helps spur up creativity. I can't draw very well, but after watching more and more tutorials and videos, I'm getting more and more confident in creating things for the Digital Realm. Here are some of my best resources, other than Dribbble or DeviantArt. Web Design ...


5

In my opinion, the specific realm of Motion Graphics, yes, it is a specialization of Graphic Design. I would put it in the same category as Print Design Web Design Motion Graphics Because the main target is to put a Graphic Design solution to a specific Medium. There are very specific specializations, like "Building labeling", "Movie Title design", "...


5

I'm a big fan of multidisciplinary work so I really like how you're trying to make the best of both worlds. One potential area that I see is work with conductive inks and hybrid media. As both an electrical engineer and a graphic designer, it seems like you could be an asset as an hired consultant for people who want to inject some interactivity in their ...


4

The price depends heavily on the environment and community you are marketing for, as well as how you present yourself. If you make your clients feel like you are nothing special or that your art is going extinct from natural selection, then you will undoubtedly be charging a lower price. I suggest you make an online resume, if you haven't already, and ...


4

I see a lot of answers pertaining to the "good looking" part of your question. I'd like to add about creativity because I think they are two completely different things. I think creativity is extremely important because it allows you to create an impression on people even if your photoshop skills are not as good. A good concept even if it's a bit on the ugly ...


4

The average is somewhere between "Freaks out if they see an HTML tag" and "can build everything they design in code". Point being there is no typical average here. In general, though, if a designer is going to focus on a particular medium (say web design) then the more they know about said medium, the more they can do with it. So it's definitely something ...


4

First, don't give up and don't think you're stuck in what you're doing now! I don't know what I can suggest you about your present job but maybe you're taking too much on your own. It's not healthy indeed to stress so much about your full time job it affects your evenings and nights. That's the kind of worries that are usually more common for entrepreneurs. ...


4

I agree with Manly. By all means, have a niche that you are awesome at, but in our industry, generalization can be helpful. I spent 10+ years in print design, but I did whatever I could to learn basic web design, video editing, even designing templates in Publisher for clients. All of which helped me get out of print and into a much better - and better ...


3

I market and consider myself both a graphic designer and front-end web developer. As someone who graduated less than 5 years ago, taught myself to code in HTML/CSS/JavaScript as well as Java, and recently have been testing the job market, I can tell you the competitive landscape of the graphic designer occupation is changing. First and foremost, a majority ...


3

Quite simply - Side Projects. By creating your own side projects you are removed from the usual client restraints. You can think of and implement more imaginative solutions. If you are doing all the work yourself you will be responsible for all areas of the project. This includes areas you may not have focused on too much before. This should help you get ...


3

Others have pointed you in the right direction—look at other people's designs a lot. Take note of the subtle details and your mind will do the rest of the work. You will start "coming up" with your own designs. However, they won't be "original" in the sense you probably hope them to be. Design, and especially interface design, isn't about creating one-of-a-...


3

Multi-skill every time. I sussed this at university (Hons graphic design & illustration) working in a print room. Three good reasons (there are many more): 1) You don't work in a bubble or the 18th century and whilst 'specialising' fits nicely with the concept of 'professional, dedicated, expert' the reality is our industry and communication in general ...


3

To figure out if something fits under "graphic design", think "does X directly affect graphics/visuals?". If the answer is "yes", then it's related to graphic design. So yes, animation is within the scope of graphic design. Whether or not a graphic designer should be familiar with creating animations depends on the needs and opinions of the people involved. ...


3

Animation an motion are technique and medium. Whether that is a "part" of graphic design or not depends on how it is being used. It's like asking "is print a part of graphic design"... sure it is, and most would say a big part of graphic design; but that doesn't mean anything printed is graphic design. As such, not everything animated is graphic design. If ...


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible