47

As others have said, images found on Google image search are not free to use unless they are licensed as such. Google does however have advanced search features that will show you images that are licensed for reuse, commercially or non-commercially. When you are doing an image search, click on "Search tools" then "Usage rights" and you will get a dropdown ...


40

Unless the image in question is accompanied by a specific statement telling you that it is royalty free and / or public domain then it is subject to copyright. There doesn't have to be a copyright symbol or registered copyright message present for copyright to apply. Trying to trace any given image back to its source, identifying the copyright holder and ...


25

If you have copied something from a design on Shutterstock and it is in distinctive enough to be recognised then you are in danger of being pursued for copyright infringement. However, Shutterstock images are sold as royalty free for commercial use, so all you need to do is purchase the image that the copied / used as inspiration on behalf of your customer ...


14

2016 Creative Commons CC0 license & Public Domain: Sites that exclusively list images in the public domain or with a Creative Commons CC0 (or equivalent) license. Pixabay Pexels Unsplash Stocknsap gratisography moveast Creative Vix Cupcake freeimages.red New Old Stock Negative Space skitterphoto Pickup Image Public Domain Photos Public Domain Archive ...


12

Most of the time images with proper documentation can avoid legal issues there are so many sites having such images, they will provide you the whole uses document on request : Corbis Images Istock Photos Shutter stock Big stock photos getty Images Find free stock Images 16 websites with Free Stock Images for commercial use Hope this will help.


11

If you infringe upon a copyright, then you are responsible, not (only) your client/customer. You are creating the artwork and it’s your responsibility to act without negligence. Using artwork from a source you know is infringement is clear negligence. Beyond that, you’d need to speak to an attorney. And I am not an attorney. None of this should be seen as ...


10

Traditionally stock sites allow you download a free, watermarked "comp" image which can be used in your design until the client approves the piece. Once the client has approved, you can then go back and purchase and download the non-watermarked image. You are free to purchase and download the non-watermarked image whenever you'd like however. It's not ...


9

On many of the stock photo sites, you can generally obtain the watermarked version of the image for free. The idea is that you wouldn't use the watermarked version in production and that it's simply just for the mock-ups. For the final version of your design, that will head to production, you would then purchase the non-watermarked versions and then replace ...


9

2016 Creative Commons CC0 license & Public Domain: Sites that exclusively list images in the public domain or with a Creative Commons CC0 (or equivalent) license. Public Domain Vectors openclipart clker Pixabay (Not exclusively vector art but easily filterable) Not exclusively free or variable licences Sites that list vectors for sale and offer ...


8

If it were me, I'd find a photo of gravel that was similar to the background of that image. Then extract the turtles from the original image and place them on the other (larger) background image, recreating shadows as necessary. Extracting the turtles and using a separate background image will provide much better results than trying to extend that limited ...


7

You could also check out http://openclipart.org/. And from the companion site, inkscape.org you can download Inkscape an easy-to-use, free, and cross-platform vector graphics program.


7

If you think it came from Getty, send them a message and see if they can dig it up for you. They'll be happy to do a little image research if they know you're going to pay.


7

Best to try to use stock images as the other folks here have said. However, if you would much rather use the image in question. You can try to get permission to use the image, thusly upholding the 8th commandment and avoiding eternal hellfire. Going to google reverse image search. Clicking the camera button to paste a link or upload an image to the search ...


6

You're in a bind in this kind of situation. You would probably be best to avoid stock photography completely. Realize that you're going to be working mostly for free. Even if you win a few, the payouts in these "contests" are painfully low. Averaged across all your entries that don't win plus the few that do (even top talent on these sites runs about 1 in 8)...


6

If you don't mind giving a credit to the picture author, you can search flickr images that use Creative Commons license, and use pictures that do not restrict commercial use. search.creativecommons.org lets you search photos with Creative Commons license across a few different services. At the moment: Wikimedia Commons, Flickr, Pixabay, Google Images & ...


6

Cool product called TinEye will do this reverse image lookup for you. Results vary depending on the source image, of course, but it could save you a bit of time.


6

Photographers selling photos through a stock agency have their own agreement with the agency. The agency then has an agreement with the customer. Who can have objections to the commercial use of such public like places, bridges or buildings? Plenty of people. But note that in most cases, it's not the public place that is copyrighted, but the particular ...


6

Some general considerations: Positioning of the title I don't feel there is an obvious advantage to any of the two/three versions, but I do prefer n. 4 because the white background highlights the image more, and the overlay of the font at the top looks pretty nice. Pick of photographs I am nor particularly tempted by the cookies, and the lemon pie ...


6

You should not use images found in google image search unless you have the proper usage right. see Creative commons licenses. You can also set your google image search to filter by usage rights (under search tools). There are may sources for stock images such as thestocks.im a collection of roality free stock libaries. Getty images also allows you to ...


5

A Google search for "stock photos" will turn up dozens of sites you can purchase images from.


5

The safest bet is not to use the original file in the building of a derivative. If you were inspired by another person's art to create something, great! Now create a new and different version with that inspiration from scratch. Make your own sketch on a blank canvas with that spark of inspiration in mind. At the most, use a piece here or there from the ...


5

Another avenue would be to contact one of the companies whose products the salon uses. sometimes they have a whole section of marketing materials and the only thing they ask is that you let their logo intact if you use their images.


5

Unsplash and Death to the Stock Photo are two favorites of mine. Great resources if you're trying to rid yourself of that typical stock photo look. More here. Albumarium is another cool site for finding nice looking photos. Be aware that the licensing differs though, not all of them are free to use for commercial projects or without attribution.


5

Be very careful of using free vectors from sites like these. A lot of the work is stolen content from stock sites like Shutterstock and iStock or traced copyright designs. If you are making designs for clients I would not advise using any of those sites. A couple of good options are GraphiRiver and Vector Stock. They have many images for $1 for commercial ...


5

Is it acceptable to use stock materials in design? Yes it is perfectly acceptable. Make sure you follow the licensing agreement but otherwise have at it. Think of it this way, Helvetica, one of the most used fonts in the world wasn't designed by any of the current designers that use it. Max Miedinger, the designer, passed away in 1980. Most fonts in fact ...


5

A celebrity is a brand. That brand is marketed to generate revenue, by using that brand to endorse products or services. By providing royalty-free, commercial use, photography you are asking that a celebrity grant the right to use their likeness to promote anything anyone wants. They don't do that for very good reasons. Suppose the celebrity has publicly ...


5

It's perfectly ethical. The same as purchasing stock photography for freelance projects. As long as you stay within the purchased license agreement there's nothing to feel bad about. Now, passing off purchased art as your own original art may be another matter. But, if asked, stating it's a purchased image is generally fine.


5

As others have said, it's poor practice as a designer and I would personally be very unhappy. And there may very well be legal issues. The use of shutterstock images for a logo has been discussed here. The image on shutterstock says: Copyright: majivecka This is from the shutterstock license: YOU MAY NOT: i. Use Visual Content other than as ...


5

On Shutterstock I was able to find some useful stuff with Mountain Topography and Mountain Rendering. If you scroll down and look at the Similar Lists you can then find more: It kinda reminds me of something made in the 3D software Bryce which isn't widely available anymore. If budget allows then for something this specific you might want to hire someone ...


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible