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27

Uncheck "Align to Pixel Grid" in the Transform Panel. You may need to first select objects, then uncheck the option on the Transform panel. When opening a new document you can uncheck the "Align to Pixel Grid" option in the new document dialog box as well. This is a feature in Illustrator 15.x (CS5) to assist in the creation of sharp web/screen images. ...


20

Certain objects will not allow the stroke alignment options. Type is one of these objects. While creating outlines of type objects may work in some instances. I, myself, prefer to keep type live whenever possible. In order to move a stroke applied to a type objects, simply do things how they were done prior to the stroke alignment options being added - with ...


18

You could create end caps by creating custom arrowheads. Here is a link to an Adobe.TV video walking you through arrowhead creation Or if you'd rather follow the Adobe Help Pages, here's what they say: To define custom arrowheads, open the Arrowheads.ai file, which is located under ShowPackageContent\Required\Resources\\ (for Mac) and \Support ...


15

Related, if not duplicate: Different color strokes in Illustrator (the gummi worms) Easiest way for me is just with a gradient on the stroke... set the middle stops to be in the same location. Benefits of this method is you simply change the gradient to move the sections. There's no need to reconfigure a brush or cut out new shapes if you need different ...


14

Simply apply the gradient to the stroke and adjust the options .... Only possible in Illustrator CS6 or newer. Make your own worms...... :) Or the burger shape.... A gradient is the only way to have more than one color assigned to a single stroke. You can use the Appearance Panel to stack strokes of varying colors, but if you want one stroke to change ...


14

Centerline Tracing The method you are looking for is "centerline tracing". This converts a bitmap to a vector line rather than an object graphic. Very few tracers will be able to do that. There is a free Open Source tool AutoTrace which does this fairly well but with limitations depending on the quality of the source image. Tracing the signature you ...


14

The pen tool is going to be better rather than drawing each line individually. However, you can take your paths and combine them into a single path by selecting them and going to: Object → Path → Join or Right Click → Join and then you can round that path by going to: Effect → Stylize → Round Corners Alternatively, once the paths are combined you can ...


13

A really easy way to achieve a sharp stroke is with a drop shadow layer style (yep, you read that correctly). The top Goomba is your example. The bottom Goomba is the same bitmap, but masked with the stroke added as a drop shadow layer style. The trick to getting it right is the custom contour curve. The same can be done with the outer glow layer style. ...


13

If you require lots of segments, it might be easiest for you to use Illustrator's graph tool. This is essentially just a hollowed out pie chart, so you can place an elipse over a chart to create your graphic.


13

You should expand the small triangle on the appearance panel and adjust as usual - If it does not work - probably the problem it the way you created the shapes


13

Add your stroke using the Appearance panel (Window → Appearance), you can then drag each appearance attribute to the order that you want. You can use this on a single object, live type or even a whole group or layer. You can either set the fill through the appearance panel too, or to use the group, layer or type's fill simply drag "Characters" or "...


13

Apply a gradient to the path stroke from black to gray and set each color location to 50%.


12

A path, as you said, is a set of points. It is a set of coordinates that define a shape. The path itself is only a set of numbers, a mathematical definition, nothing more. Anything you see on your screen is a visual representation of that path. A stroke is a visual attribute that you can apply to a path. A stroke can have a defined width, color or a number ...


12

Another method would be to use a Scatter brush instead of a Pattern brush. Create your arrow head, select it and create new Scatter brush. Select "Rotation relative to path". Select your path, apply Scatter brush to your stroke, then go to Appearance panel and add a new dashed stroke. The good thing about Scatter brush is that they don't distort. The ...


11

Add an anchor point to one of the line segments, say, the vertical segment, at a specific distance seen from the corner anchor point (p1), and then use the Direct Selection Tool (white arrow in the tool panel) to move the original corner point the same distance along the other line segment. Then choose the Convert Anchor Point tool (Shift-C) and click on ...


10

Simply draw your paths then use the Width Tool: You can click-drag a stroke to alter its width in Illustrator CS5 or CS6.


10

What you essentially need to do is separate the stroke from the fill. Then subtract the stroke from the fill. You can do this by using the Object > Expand item in the menu then the Pathfinder Panel or Shape Builder Tool will allow you to cut the stroke from the fill. So.... Select the hand Object > Expand (tick all options and hit OK) Click the ...


10

There is a little known feature, in Illustrator, that allows you to do this non-destructively. That is without expanding and using pathfinder. This can bring some future flexibility to your designs. As a bonus its also less work and works inside effects. First turn on transparency grid or put something behind your graphic. This ensures that you can observe ...


10

Yes, you can make the outlined path thicker. Simplest way is to just apply a stroke on the outlines. This will then be added to your stroke (so remember it needs to be 1/2 the additional weight you need). Closed outlines may need this done to both sides. A bit more cleaner way would be to offset the outline. I suggest using Effect → Path → Offset ...


10

In your file we have two (or three) nested problems. The first is related to the group: for a grouped object we see 0 px as stroke value: Your icon is nested in a series of groups, and you have to hit Shift-Ctrl-G repeatedly until done: The stroke width is 0 px again, and in this case is correct, because your path is composed by an outer and an inner ...


10

There is a way to make variable width strokes using the Power Stroke path effect, however it doesn't seem to work properly with a closed path such as a circle (in Inkscape 0.92) Example: What you could do instead is Path > Stroke to path - then edit the nodes of the inner path. Example:


10

I'm not sure if this is the case, but sometimes the icons are made with a double stroke to mimic a fake stroke width. At the icons below there are three different strokes: 1px 1px black + 2px grey 2px This is the second icon structure:


9

Method one - works with any shape. Create a no-fill, no-stroke rectangle and place a $ sign in the middle of it. $ sign must be on top of the rectangle. The amount of space between the $ sign and the rectangle edges will determine the spacing between the repeated $ signs. Drag all that to the Brush panel and choose Pattern Brush when asked. Then click OK ...


9

This may not be the most efficient method, but here is what I do: Take the file into photoshop, fiddle with the levels and brightness-contrast to get a high contrast image. Then make it black and white and maybe fiddle a little more with the contrast. Remove the background (the white), and save it as an image with transparency (e.g. png). Then, in ...


9

The "ellipse tool" is actually the "Ellipse Selection tool" in GIMP: by using it you create a Selection on the image. Selections in image drawing programs, including GIMP, are not part of the visible image per se (they are indicated by the "marching ants" boundary, but are invisible in any saved or exported version of the image) - rather, selections ...


9

Assuming the yellow needs to be removed from the mountain. Select the yellow and choose Object > Expand from the menu. This converts the strokes to shapes. Pathfinder doesn't work well with strokes, it needs shapes. Once the strokes are expanded you should be able to use Pathfinder to subtract the yellow shapes from the mountain (or anything else).


9

The alpha channel is all the way down. Alpha controls basically the same thing as opacity, but it is for that color specifically. Set it all the way up to have the stroke shown.


9

Your example, the O, isn't a stroke with non-uniform width. It's a combined path. This is normal for how letters are constructed. Draw 2 ellipses, fill only, no stroke, different sizes Align the ellipses, bring the smaller to front, select both Apply Path > Subtract. The result is a combined path. The parts can be recovered (not colors) with Path > Break ...


8

or you can just go native way :D


8

I am not sure at what point you are unable to apply the gradient. Here is a very short tutorial on how to apply a gradient to a stroke. First create the gradient in the gradient panel Once you're done picking the swatch colors you will want to save the gradient as a swatch. Click on the "new swatch" button next to the trash icon and save that gradient as ...


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