New answers tagged

0

Color selector has alpha slider. In the next image both circles have black stroke and cyan fill. The rightmost circle has 50% transparent fill color (alpha=128) Unfortunately there's a thing you maybe didn't expect. The stroke is half-way covered by the fill and the covered half become visible. A fast workaround is to have 2 separate shapes (=edge & ...


0

The object might have a white fill applied to it, making it appear invisible. You can change the view to Outline view in the view menu of illustrator (or by hitting command-Y) – this way you will see all of the existing paths without styling attributes like fill or strokes.


0

Technically, it does not disappear, but in fact gets covered with a white fill, probably because some other points in the shape also need to be joined to create a continuos line. There are other unclosed segments in there and Illustrator treats those as separate, overlapping, objects filled with white. Remove the white fill from everything and you're 100% ...


0

I think the key difference here is the Pencil tool "basic" setting is a simple stroke, whereas a brush is actually a shape applied along a path. When you Expand the Appearance of a brush, you are essentially revealing this underlying shape. A stroke on the other hand has no underlying shape to be revealed. Illustrator's user interface is possibly the ...


0

There's surely no other reason that expanding the non-brush version is decided to be flattened such way. The same principle is used in Inkscape and Affinity Designer. Brush strokes are complex because any shape can actually be a brush if defined so. The brush pattern is mapped along a plain Bezier curve when a brush is applied. With some tinkering you can ...


0

You'll get similar symptoms unless you pre-select a stroke paint (initially set to none). I wonder why Inkscape could not warn about this instead of allowing the up-arrow adjust stroke width to go from 0.000mm to 0.100mm and have it magically jump back to 0.000mm...


0

I usually find this happens because the expanding process creates two or more overlapping anchors in a place where one should be sufficient. First off, try expanding a simple object without any of the additional strokes applied and add those outlines afterwards. Use a graphic style if you need this operation repeatedly. If the problem persists, it is most ...


1

Open or improperly closed paths most likely. Double check your shapes and make sure what's supposed to be closed, is in fact, closed — and not just apparently closed. This is not a 'glitch'.


Top 50 recent answers are included