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13

Ambiguity or unreadability is not always a bad thing in a logo. Being too literal can, at times, cause a design to suffer. It all inevitably comes down to how a mark is going to be used. An unreadable logo by itself can be detrimental to a startup or a company without a decent marketing budget. If the goal is to just throw the mark on items or good and have ...


13

Albrecht Dürer's drawing is technically a wood carving - a common method to make printing plates to print drawings onto paper. The method has been used in Asia at least 1000 years, but in Europe it became common in 15th century. Gutenberg's typesetting made wood carving soon obsolete for printing texts, but for image printing it was used a long time. The ...


11

I'd call it scrapbook, collage or paper and paste style - emulating the traditional school book art.


10

Select the style you'd like to edit in the graphic style menu Switch to Appearance panel and edit any appearance item (like fill color or effect for example) Go to Appearance panel menu, and select: "Redefine graphic style style_name_from_step_1" Done!


9

The 90s had quite a few styles over the span of that decade that I think would be identifiable as big graphic design trends. It started with a holdover from the late 80s that I'd perhaps call 'neon': The mid-90s were dominated both visually and musically by the grunge/seattle-sound. Two of the big names from that era would have been Art Chantry (and a lot ...


9

There's no name for the style you're referring to that I'm aware of. Its just using Gestalt Principle of Closure which can be read about in all sorts of places such as Creative Bloq: Gestalt Theory. The most iconic probably being the World Wildlife Foundation Panda We also have a number of questions on the topic: https://graphicdesign.stackexchange.com/...


9

You might also be interested in scratch-board or scraper-board techniques that approximate some of these effects. Although the process is different, the line quality is/can be very similar.


8

Interesting. Not entirely sure what part of the style you are after, but I am going to take your noir as a hint. Actually, I think you are pretty close in your search, but I think you need to use "film noir poster". That will give you a lot of stuff like this: Another search term is "pulp paperback cover" or "pulp fiction". This is the classic name for ...


7

You're delving into a matter of taste here. There are many ways to be minimal. You have done it successfully, in my opinion. I suspect it is the extreme reduction in styling that is bothering your friends. All critiques are not equal The first question you should ask is, are your friends representative of your target audience? If not, find some people who ...


7

We don't do brainstorming here but we can help refining what the problem is and looking at the way to approach coming up with ideas for something like this. We're talking about visual metaphors that evoke the right kind of associations and that set the right mood, tone and associations. 'Cyber' in the late 90's and early 2000's generally evoked the idea ...


7

Things to consider: Larger inner margin not outer. A larger inner margin helps prevent text from being crammed into the gutter of the spine. If you don't leave ample margin for the inner side you may find it gets difficult to read text near the gutter with every additional page. Creep. Creep happens when books are bound. Each signature needs to be slightly ...


7

Every designer has the problem, but... That cake business, yeah you didn't get it right the first time. The dog trainer? Nope you didn't get it perfect either. You know what did happen? You got something up and running that was good enough. They don't care if the UX isn't flawless, the design isn't cutting edge, and the markup isn't beautiful... whatever ...


6

My two pennies; my first education was an apprenticeship in bookbinding... (book-geek, yes) The classical way to define frames for content on book pages are based on the 5-7; and allow me to point you to CraigMod - he knows what he is talking about: Image of page layouts Craigmod - books in the age of the ipad The construction of these things take ...


6

These are offshoots of Delaunay Triangulation and can most easily be found by searching for "Delaunay Illustration", "Triangulated Illustrations" or "Triangulation Illustrations" There are other tools that have since become available such as, DMesh.


6

While we could trace the aesthetic back to various art and design styles such as the aforementioned cubism, there are some more recent terms such as low-poly or faceted illustration. Tim Reynolds was one of the earlier users of the style. It can be done via 3D rendering (where it originates...essentially reducing the polygons used to render a complex ...


6

After years of working with clients and bosses I have learned to always ask, "Why?". For instance in your situation I would be asking, "What's the problem you are trying to solve with using a photograph?". This does two things: It reframes the question from design specifics to a language you both speak well It reframes allows your boss to elaborate on his ...


5

If you're talking about the lettering for 'Ericana', you'll do well to search for 'baseball script' or 'sports script'. Here's an excerpt from the Baseball Hall of Fame's web site: When one thinks of the quintessential baseball uniform, it is often adorned with a team or city name angled across the shirt front in script lettering. The first big league ...


5

The style is "cubist" or "cubism" but I think the images you post have a definite digital feel. I would call them "cubist illustration" or "digital cubism" if I were trying to specify and illustration style.


5

Cubism Cubism is an early-20th-century avant-garde art movement pioneered by Georges Braque and Pablo Picasso, joined by Jean Metzinger, Albert Gleizes, Robert Delaunay, Henri Le Fauconnier, Fernand Léger and Juan Gris1 that revolutionized European painting and sculpture, and inspired related movements in music, literature and architecture. Cubism has ...


5

I call them origami illustrations.


5

what worked for me is this: with nothing selected, click the style. go to Appearance, do the mods you need, drag the little preview icon left of the name to the styles window, overwriting the previous style. in order to overwrite a style, hold Ctrl+alt and drop it on top of the old one. all previously styled objects adopt the new style. best of luck to ...


5

No I don't think it fits into any of the styles you listed. Road textures and paint splatters are usually associated with grunge and/or graffiti as far as I know. Which makes sense since Berkvisual is a graffiti artist.


5

Get and open up Inkscape (completely free, open source vector editor). Import your reference image into Inkscape (File > Import) Start blocking in the polygons and triangles around the faces of the people in the image. If you look closely at the wallpaper, the most basic shapes (large, non-detailed shapes) are at least 3 sides (duh). I would block them in in ...


5

I don't think there is a specific name, but I guess you could call it a grunge paint texture. I think it's meant to look a bit like an impressionistic/grungy watercolour illustration. In my opinion, it has almost certainly been done digitally in Photoshop (or similar raster image editor), starting with a photograph of a street scene, and with the use of a ...


4

In your case I would have maybe used GREP styles shown on the image below. Here ~h stands for End Nested Style Here character which serves as a style divider (visible in special characters mode as a backslash). If you feel more comfortable with any other character feel free to replace all the ~h-s with anything you like from the drop-down menu. The ...


4

Usually, brand guidelines are for everyone, while design guidelines are the subset for designers. It varies (particularly by geography and size of organisation), but usually "brand guidelines" are the broad umbrella including: "Vision" or "Mission statement" etc etc Tone of voice and writing style guidelines Logo files and usage guidelines (e.g. white ...


4

This is really good question. But I am afraid you can't standardize a style guide. There are guidelines to make one but a lot of it depends entirely on the complexity of the website you are creating. The guide you got your hands on is focused on typograhy which is by all means a really good thing. But not all websites can be understood by just that. Some ...


4

Both styles, while slightly different, can be summed up as flat vector illustration


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