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15

EPS is an old format with support for full transparency (i.e the background can be tranparent), and also supports the use of clipping paths for transparency around a raster image, but it doesn't support semi-transparent fills, or gradients with semi-transparency. Doesn't really matter what software you use. It's not actually possible in a pure EPS format, ...


11

Use Illustrator's 3D Extrude and Bevel effect. Give the shape a thick coloured stroke and no fill, then apply Effects > 3D > Extrude and Bevel, and use similar settings as shown below. Tweak as necessary. Here I added a white fill to the shape, and a second new light in the 3D Extrude and Bevel options.


11

SVG is often not suitable for... Embroidery Signage Print production When providing a logo you should provide usable formats for a range of things. SVG, EPS, AI, PDF, PSD, JPG, PNG, even GIF. Simply because an SVG file can be opened in an editor and resaved is not a reason to fail to provide viable formats to the client. What if the client doesn't want to ...


10

You need to have the Show Transform Handles option selected in the tool controls along the top Then use the Edit Paths by Nodes tool F2 to select the two nodes by clicking and dragging a selection around them Hold down Shift as you click and drag the transform handles.


7

Auto tracing doesn't work with gradients. You don't need 3D software for this. Use a vector image editor such as Illustrator or Inkscape (which is free), trace the bitmap just as a solid black graphic, then re-create the gradients by sampling the colours from the original using the Eyedropper tool, and fill the graphics with the gradients. If you have more ...


6

but I'm not sure what the client would miss out on in regard of print What the client will be missing is color accuracy. It used to be that most printers will refuse to accept RGB files which by extension means all Inkscape svg files. The reason for this is that they risk the client rejecting their print jobs due to the colors not matching. These days ...


5

I learn something new nearly every day: From The Blog of the Baodad Tree website: How To Make a Trapezoid in Inkscape Draw a rectangle. Convert it to a path (Path > Object to Path) Use the node select tool (F2) to select the two corners of the rectangle that you want to adjust to form a trapezoid (You have to hold down the shift key to ...


5

Let me explore the topic a bit. The shape If we are attempting to do this with vector shapes, the shape itself must be right. It is easy to have deformed or disproportional shapes. One way to prepare them is duplicating the overall shape and using the contour lines thicker on the shape it will be the final border of the shadow. Now we have 2 shapes to ...


5

This effect can be achieved by many different ways like masking and etc but I'll use photoshop's Angle Gradient effect to achieve this one. Create circle shape via shape tool. Remove fill and border. Apply Gradient Effect on circle layer. Change gradient to single color via removing all extra color nodes (down pins in gradient editor) Drag opacity controls (...


5

This is for Inkscape Begin with a circle Select the gradient mesh tool, in the tool controls bar hit the Conical gradient button, set 8 rows and 8 columns, and click and drag on the circle to apply a mesh. Click and drag to select all stops on the gradient, and change the colour to green Select other stops, and change to white Click and drag the arc ...


4

It's hard to see, and there's no commentary or explanation given in the video, but I think I know how it's done. No snapping options need to be set for it to work. In fact probably best to switch off all snapping in the snap controls bar so these don't conflict with rescaling. In Edit > Preferences > Behavior > Transform, make sure the option to "Scale ...


4

In recent versions of Inkscape there is an extension called "Replace font" which can list all the used fonts in the document, find & replace specific fonts, or replace all the fonts in the document or current selection. To use the tool, navigate to Extensions -> Text -> Replace Font. On the "List all fonts" tab, if you click &...


4

In Inkscape: If you click once on your object, you get a bounding box to stretch it, but if you click twice, you get different arrows around the box for rotation and shearing, only one relevant of the 8 arrows shown. (Somehow the yellow circle was lost by copying the image over here.) By pulling the black arrow up/down you get the perspective effect (top ...


4

This has nothing to do with SVG really. I think it's the design that is the problem. Looks like the lines are too thin, so when you are rescaling them they are becoming less than a pixel. Change the design if you want something that is to be displayed at such a small size, or alternatively don't scale it so much that it will cause a problem. Yes, it's ...


4

You can't actually "convert" PNGs to SVG. It's not possible. There's no one to one mapping of raster images directly to vector images. However, you can certainly auto trace raster images to make vectors, but results may vary and depend a lot on the kind of image, and the quality of the original, and the settings used in vector software. Inkscape ...


4

There is no good solution. I mean you can force a solutuon but it will never be a good solution since the standard does not give you any tools for this. The filters were supposed to be enough for you. You can only use things that whatever subset your SVG engine supports. Using a different application will not change this. Besides filters the only other ...


4

This is for Inkscape. Select the paths using the Edit Paths by Nodes tool Click and drag to select the nodes you want to resize In the toolbar along the top, hit the Show Transform Handles button Resize using the handles, move into position using the arrow keys on your keyboard. You will likely have to manually adjust the path where the head joins with ...


3

Try ungrouping the letter after you convert it to a path. Inkscape always groups text after converting to path, even if it's only one letter. Ctrl + Shift + G will ungroup. FYI, check the text displayed on the panel at the very bottom of the screen (under the colours). You can often get a tip there as to what might be wrong. In this case, it would say one ...


3

Inkscape 1.0 supports this now here... File → Export PNG image → Advanced → pHYs dpi setting


3

An easy task. Copy your existing vector, then use Edit, Paste in Place. Select Path, Dynamic offset and drag the handle to get the desired offset, which will appear "concentric," although that term is inaccurate.


3

I would strongly recommend SVGOMG. It's a great (open source) tool and it allows you to really fine tune the level of cleaning up / optimization it performs. They obviously allow you to easily strip out the unnecessary info, but they also allow you to easily optimize other portions of the SVG.


3

TLDR: I would recommend Inkscape (although this is just my own personal preference). I don't want to denigrate other capable software such as Adobe Illustrator,Sketch, Affinity Designer, etc. The "random stuff" isn't random stuff. Let me explain further: In Inkscape when you save an "Inkscape SVG" it contains Inkscape specific XML. This ...


3

Redrawing manually is probably the best way. Sometimes the best results require a little drudgery. There's no real need to use the Pen Tool for this if that's what scares you. The Curvature tool is nice for making almost perfect curves without too much effort. It could be constructed as follows: On top of the raster image, draw simple curves made with the ...


3

There are several possible ways to do this. This one is non-destructive: Here I have used a drop shadow on the top shape (which is a rounded rectangle). Then I duplicated all the shapes of the logo, and did a Path Finder Union on it. Finally I grouped the logo, then applied the united shape as clipping mask to the group. Using this method, there's no ...


3

Graphic designers generally don't use raster software for designing logos. They use vector software such as: Adobe Illustrator, CorelDraw, Affinity Designer, Inkscape (which is free), etc. You've tagged your question "vector" and "SVG", so I suspect you already know this. My advice would be to redraw the artwork using vector image editing ...


3

In Illustrator add anchor points to all elements a couple of times. In the menu bar go to Object -> Path -> Add Anchors Then, in the SVG options panel, increase the Decimal Places to the max (7 I think?) and see if the results are any better.


3

Thanks, @Billy Kerr! I saw the posts on StackOverflow (first and second) and figured out I'll need to use potrace. First, convert PNG files to BMP, because potrace can work only with BMP. It is possible to do using an online site, but it's easier and always free offline. To process multiple files using potrace, a bash script is needed: #!/bin/bash for ...


3

Looks like you have only Combined the shapes, meaning they are still different paths. You need to Merge Shape Components. Example


3

The SVG has several problems, although "several" might be a slight underestimate! It has a bazillion clipping paths and excessive nested groups generated by your plotting software. I'd suggest these are just totally confusing poor old Inkscape. For example, one of the raster images has 5 levels of nested groups. This is totally excessive. Possible ...


3

Thank you all for your replies, all three answers so far were very helpful and highlighted different aspects. I will try to compile and summarize into one answer, what I understood from reading your input (I apologize if putting that into it's own answer isn't appropriate). Just providing SVG files for logos is not sufficient, since it lacks CMYK support ...


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