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Yes, this is normal. Practically all royalty-free stock image sites have a clause which prohibits usage as a primary brand identifier (logo). Your usage is described as a logo usage overall, even if you aren't calling it a "logo". I understand the issue is troubling for you. But I don't know what resolution you are expecting here. Either purchase ...


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Stock image sites can make any rule they want as far a licensing is concerned. It's their business, and their rules. So yes, that's normal. You may have to pay for an extended licence for certain uses. They might not allow certain uses at all. I've come across this before where certain images are not allowed to be used for example as prints or on printed ...


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I'm sure you'll find suitable icons of vegetables in about any stock image website like Adobe stock, shutterstock, iStock, pixabay etc. https://www.shutterstock.com/search/brocoli+icon No affiliation to any of these Never seen this rule for any stock image and am not sure why they made this rule. The most similar rule I came across is that if an illustration ...


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'Poppler/Cairo import' basically converts all text to paths while 'Internal import' keeps it as text objects. The reason they seem to have different thickness is probably because of 'hinting' which is a mechanism used when rendering fonts that aligns the text outlines to the pixel grid, making them look sharp at any resolution. Regular paths however don't ...


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You don't, some software do it better but essentially your asking for 270 degree arc created with a a single Bezier span. This is not going to work. Essentially anything over 180 degree, is way off, 180 may under some circumstances acceptable but 90 seems to be ok for most uses, and 60 or 45 if you need to have any sort of real accuracy. So I am afraid that ...


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I can get the SVG down to 26.5kb if that's any help, without having to resort to using any compressed format. Here's how I did it. Open the PDF in Inkscape, select everything and ungroup everything several times. Select all the separate lines in the long block along the bottom, and do Path > Combine. This get's rid of all the excess paths by merging ...


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PDF is by onset much more compressed than SVG which is verbose indeed. In addition to being more optimal to begin with you whould never compare SVG with PDF directly because the PDF is likely to be compressed. So at minimum you should be comparing a zipped up SVGZ file with the PDF. So to get an idea how much more compressed PDF is to SVG consider how ...


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Instead of saving as 'Inkscape SVG', try 'Optimized SVG' and experimenting with its settings. It strips a lot of redundant information. There is also 'Compressed Inkscape/Plain SVG (*.svgz)', however it's not guaranteed that other software will support this format.


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Powerpoint tends to do random things... It would be better to use an app that is more suited for this purpose like Inkscape. In this case you then can open the svg file you already got and fix this issue.


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Yea, so I am having this issue as well, I believe that the issue resides in the image resolution that you are importing into illustrator, when the svg exports, it does not use the image resolution in illustrator, but the resolution in the image files themselves.


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It's caused by having overlapping edges of strokes which causes conflation artefacts. Basically in this case, the effect is like losing the anti-aliasing a bit. This is a common issue with vectors, and not specifically an Inkscape issue. Conflation can also be caused by having two edges of a shape butting up against each other, which can cause a thin gap to ...


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This has nothing to do with Inkscape, but with how anti-aliasing and SVG rendering in general works. When you overlap multiple lines on top of each other, you also add more and more anti-aliased half-transparent pixels, making them less and less transparent. Here is a simple line with anti-aliasing and then the same line duplicated over and over. Notice how ...


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Outlining the text (Mac: Shift+Cmd+O) (PC: Shift+Ctl+O) for eps and svg files can often makes more sense. Usually more light-weight file (depending on font family and text amount), so might be better for web use. And printers and manufacturer usually much prefer fonts outlined. But not selectable / copyable anymore this way.


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When exporting change the 'Font' option from 'SVG' to "Convert to outlines" Problem would be solved


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Don't use GIMP because it only has very basic vector capabilities. GIMP is a raster image editor. It's not the right kind of software. The whole thing can be made in Inkscape. You can import your jpeg as a guide to redraw it. Delete the jpeg afterwards. Enable the page grid and snapping to grid to make the following steps easier. I assume basic familiarity ...


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You can use Inkscape without GUI from the command line. Simply opening and re-exporting the file seems to recalculate flowed text: inkscape -o ./output.svg ./input.svg or piping from stdin to stdout: ... | inkscape -p -o - | ...


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