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42

Edward Tufte is the one that coined the term chart junk to refer to extraneous visual elements that tend to clutter, rather than clarify the data being presented. This can refer to all sorts of things that you tend to see often, but don't really enhance the understanding and--often--actively interfere with the understanding of the data. These can include: ...


19

@Yisela recommends Gnumeric. I would also recommend looking at LibreOffice. What I've done in the past is: Create my tables in LibreOffice Writer, applying formatting such as row borders, cell spacing, and so on. Copy the table, open up LibreOffice Draw, and paste the table as a "LibreOffice Text Document" using "Paste Special". Select just the table. Go ...


12

I think you may reconsider the issue of your question by focusing on the table purpose instead of any general guideline. For instance, if the readers need to compare the content of different rows, it may be easier to differentiate each row. You can also consider to implement contrasts between columns instead. There are several options to make rows or ...


9

Since you mention Excel, something you could do is use Gnumeric to import your .xls files into it, and from there export them as SVG. Unlike Excel, Gnumeric has more export options that would allow you to create more complex elements without having to actually draw them on Inkscape. There is also an extension for Inkscape called NiceCharts that is good for ...


9

I don't believe you or your coworker are right. The more important issue is readability. Spacing on its own can effectively do this, lines / shading can often help to use less space. Here we have a table with pretty normalized spacing and no lines. It's hard to follow because the numbers are primarily designed to be read left to right, not top to bottom. ...


6

There is no functionality for making tables per se, but with a combination of symbols and a plugin called stack children you might be able to make tables easier. It doesn't automatically generate a grid like your example, but if you create a symbol out of a row of the table, the plugin will help you align them one under the other.


5

Create the table w/ more columns than you need, merge columns to create the desired standard appearance, then when you need further flexibility, unmerge cells and join them as needed. Or, in more recent versions of InDesign, use the command to split cells horizontally or vertically.


4

The common way to show data on a phone is reorder all the data from columns to rows. You can find several libraries to do that, just search for "responsive tables". For example "reflow" Table: Reflow And just for a reference , you can also read this: 10+ Solutions for Responsive Data Tables Regarding the different platforms, yes, you should stick to them ...


4

Yes, sort of. You can place a textbox inside the table and round that. The technique is a bit tedious but I'm sure somebody has written a script to manage this, if not one could be made. Image 1: Table with textboxes that have rounded corners


4

As I said it hard to do that task using Acrobat Illustrator so I suggest to do it using Indesign. before I begin I have to apologize of making a long solution and for not doing all the step... some steps need try and error to get your desire result First you need to construct your table layout, go to Table > Create Table or press Ctrl + Alt + ...


4

You need to study this part of the ID interface, especially the "Cell Height" (which forces your rows to be taller) and "Top/Bottom Cell Insets" (same result, but by increasing inside cell margins) on the right side. There's also a lot of Youtube content on this.


3

There's Window > Styles > Table styles and Window > Styles > Cell styles, which you should pretty much always use when working with tables in Indesign. Both panels were introduced cs3 Create a new table style in the Table styles panel and double click it to go to its options. There you can assign cell styles to specific parts of the table. If ...


3

Identify the non-neutral elements of your table and figure out how to fix them. the table has an uneven color distribution, with very bright cells and very dark cells, both of which attract attention, and so are not neutral. several table cells have the same color, these also draw the eye and brain into finding a connection, and so again, not neutral some ...


3

Well, you can import external objects into InDesign in a easy way. If I remember correctly, you can do it with the shortcut Ctrl+D (Cmd + D on Mac). When you do that, there is a window with options for the Import features where you can customize the way you do it. There are options for tables, where you can keep the original format, or use plain text, or csv,...


3

Smrita, I know it can be pretty challenging if you're unsure about the design. I will try to be as clear as possible. You may not be able to implement some of my suggestions because of business policy or authority. Also, this might sound a little prescriptive, please try things out and adjust. When trying to "fix design inconsistencies" it helps to step ...


3

I don't know if this is a viable option for you, but I would alter the styling so that it's clear which rows are children. Instead of two colors for the zebra striping, I would use four. I would also use nested tables: There is still a even/odd collision, but it's still readable to me this way. Here is how it would look collapsed: JSFiddle demo


3

In the Table Panel (or control bar with a table highlighted) you can set the cell height to "Exactly" and insert the value you want. But... you're right.. you can't save this particular aspect to a cell or table style. To use a style you might try this.... Create a paragraph style which sets the type size to match your desired cell height. For example, ...


3

Command-Shift T will snap the "Tabs" window above whatever text box is active. Then, for this instance, select the far left option ("Left-Justified Tab") and click where you would like your tab to start (clicking anywhere on the gray portion above the ruler). Any lines that are tabbed will be at the point you specified (unless the characters before your tab ...


3

As you mentioned before, I think the simplest solution would be to have the holidays on a separate layer. Trying to add them to your current table, although it is possible, could overcomplicate your design. That being said this could be achieved by splitting each day's cell into three parts (Instead of one): Far left would be the date. Top right would be ...


3

They did a nice job with this solution I think: https://angel.co/projects/277264-zeguro-style-guide-brand-design It's clean but gets the point across.


3

First of all, check if there are any preferred style guides you should be following. If there are, there should be guidelines for the use of tables and units etc. With regards to the units—I don't see any problem with stating the unit in the caption, but I would personally declare it in the column header. If the columns used different units, you would ...


3

In my opinion... remove them all! The use of a table implies some specific usage of headers, columns and rows. Any punctuation like : or . is irrelevant on this context. So play with the spacing, font, weight, backgrounds and colors. But there is a small chance that the green one has some sense. n_n. You could complement its meaning aligning that word to ...


3

No, you cannot lock formatting and keep raw data unlocked in InDesign. Some alternatives: InCopy is able to allow limited access to INDD files, assuming your client is willing to learn another software. try to set up the table as a linked CSV file. This way the client can edit the CSV in Excel and update the link in InDesign. Some research will be needed ...


3

There is a field width, if you select the columns. This field is by default an "at least" dimension. Means, that you can scale things manually and InDesign will adapt. If you change that field to "exact" and you use the desired width, things should work out fine.


3

Definitely possible, you just need to make sure your entire content runs as linked (threaded) text frames, then each time a new table is needed just insert that into the same multi-page text frame flow. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Ij8aFNIKsl8 https://helpx.adobe.com/indesign/using/threading-text.html https://helpx.adobe.com/indesign/using/creating-...


2

Simply use a separate class for the parent rows. With a separate class on parent rows you can control then independently. From a visual standpoint, parent rows should not appear the same shade as standard child rows in my opinion. Here's an example: table { width: 80%; margin: 40px;} td { padding: 6px 10px; } tr.parent:nth-of-type(2n+1) { background:#a00; }...


2

No. CorelDRAW is not intended for book work. However X6 has some enhanced layout tools and features like text styles, baseline grid, dynamic page numbering etc. But unfortunately ToC or subject index cannot be yet done automatically. CorelDraw Forums


2

If you simply do not want hyphens, uncheck "Hyphenate" on the Paragraph Panel. The "No Break" option in the Character Panel menu means "place all (selected) text on one single line" - a la - don't break text into multiple lines


2

You're not missing anything. Datamerge is not able to make true tables by itself. It is great for making things like contact sheets or business cards or labels etc. things that repeat the same layout over and over. It is not good at putting data into an Indesign table. There is a free script that may be useful in getting this into a table for you found here....


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