33

Just some extra pointers to try to break from bad habits, since I think the previous answers are pretty thorough. Position the Paper Comfortably Pay attention to the position of the paper and modify it until you find the most comfortable position for you. Keeping the paper straight in front of you will force your wrist to strain and contort in order to be ...


25

There are many ways of approaching this. You're right, a curve does not have to be made out of one piece, it can be built out of several pieces. In fact one curve can be built out of several curves. I have answered a similar question, about spiral caps, mostly the same applies here. When you do is you make a initial shape and then rotate and mirror it ...


20

With a pattern. In this case a 3 axis grid (triangular). Once you know what to draw on each piece, you need to repeat this. You can have and use sub-patterns or smaller ones to be more exact. These patterns are pretty easy to draw, and they are used for example in architecture in different cultures. We are used more to a square pattern, but this triangular ...


16

Lab Primer The world is full of magic things, patiently waiting for our senses to grow sharper. (Yeats) Lab, which I often read as Lab but is properly said L-a-b, is amazing. It makes the world a more colorful place. If you've ever taken magic mushrooms, its kinda like that. With Magic Mushrooms subtle color differences can become far more apparent because ...


15

The easiest way is probably to use a 2D greyscale image as a depth map to extrude a 3D object. 3D programs will give you more control but you can do this in Photoshop (see Create 3D objects from 2D images in Photoshop - Adobe Support). This for example, took me a few minutes in Photoshop: Using this as a depth map: Chae Byung-rok does have a few other ...


14

Every artist works differently, but the basic concept is called "painting on a colored ground." The idea is that you do not start with white, and the most (western) traditional method is to start with a 40-70% grey (or brown) tone. This allows you to work "up" to white and "down" to black. In my experience anything darker than 50% grey tends to give an ...


14

In all kinds of drawing, a formalised methodology has been attempted for centuries (ref. The Vitruvian man). Rules and guidelines for proportions of the human body etc. have been drawn out for the use in architecture and art (and in some cases to hunt for the magic golden section). This, in a way, is an engineering approach to imagery: laying down basic ...


9

The artist in your link is painting from dark to light. By laying down a dark layer first, he can then paint highlights on top of it. This is often easier than trying to paint in every crease which creates a shadow. In general, you can paint from dark to light, light to dark, or middle to light and dark. If the overall piece is intended to be of a darker ...


9

Here are a few things that have worked for me. Be comfortable Pick a pen you're comfortable with. A tool you enjoy. Ballpoint pen, pencil, fountain pen, whatever. This is important. Having fun boosts learning. Imitate Look at other people's handwriting, and pick a style you like. Try to copy that style a bit, but don't worry too much about not being ...


9

It's a lot like drawing......Muscle memory. Consciously and deliberately write the way you want to write .... then do it some more, then more, and even more. If you still feel it's ugly, keep practicing. Slow down and be even more deliberate. If it helps, use vellum or tracing paper and retrace the parts of your writing you do like. The important thing is ...


8

Take a calligraphy course. Calligraphy literally means beautiful writing (from the Greek kalos "beauty" + graphein "to write"). When learning calligraphy, you will learn about the shapes of letters, different "hands" (italic, gothic, blackletter), how the nib (point) of the calligraphic pen produces different effects, and how to produce those effects ...


7

What follows presumes that you want to do italic writing, the kind championed by the late Alfred Fairbank CBE. Use a pencil, HB or B according to taste, and a toothy lined pad, the kind you can buy in bulk at Staples for example. The pencil can be a wooden grade-school kind, or a mechanical one. I use a 0.5mm mechanical. Angle the pad comfortably (you'll ...


7

Get a nature journal and spend a few weeks making a go at it. Small things are good so you can focus on the basics of observation and not get overwhelmed by the subject. You'll make lots of mistakes but don't criticize too early. Just draw. A lot. And draw everything you see. Any sketchbook that seems convenient will work. I like Moleskine's Cahier books ...


7

A good lesson for nearly any graphic design student is to learn how to design without leaning on software automation to do it for you. :) That said, this couldn't be automated very well to begin with. It's simply 'design' in the sense that someone took the time to carefully draw it. As for the particular style, it's 'art deco'...which is quite appropriate ...


7

I think it's simply an innovation that no one particularly wants, wants to pay for, or wants to support. Physical world applications To do this in the physical world is of course possible, but until we have very cheap, flexible, robust and low-powered displays on our hands (one day I guess) that's not going to happen. Plus physical music sales will probably ...


7

User Billy Kerr has already said the essentials and there's seemingly popped up an answer, too. Here's a practical way to create the textured colors: Have a desaturated photo of an everyday material texture. Here's 3 different. Insert 2 layers over the texture layer: A curves or levels adjustment layer to get the wanted contrast; here the contrast is ...


6

You can do it with sculpt/painting Just move your objects in random directions, shrink/enlarge and rotate Example of the result:


6

All of the answers (which are excellent) assume that you are correct, that your handwriting is "terrible". Perhaps not. Perhaps the secret for you is to stop being critical and just love the handwriting you have. Over time it will change, each of your idiosyncrasies may grow into extravagant flourishes or fade away. Who knows. That is part of the fun of ...


6

In the preferences it's called "keyboard increment" and is under General: you can set it pretty darn small if you want to - I just tested 0.001 pt and it worked perfectly. In the Smart guides area of the preferences you can also set snap tolerance, which can also help with the kind of precision you're looking for. General: Smart guides: Hope this ...


5

Albrecht Durer was a masterful engraver, but the only way he was going to achieve 40 lines per millimetre was by accident. He was working at a time before (just before, but before nonetheless) the Venetian glassmakers' trade secret was leaked and they lost monopoly control of their new cristallo (which was less than 50 years old when St. Eustace was created)....


5

I'd call it a bricolage. In the visual arts bricolage is the construction or creation of a work from a diverse range of things that happen to be available, or a work created by such a process. The term is borrowed from the French word bricolage. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bricolage Other names it may be known by: Merz Polystylism Collage Assemblage


5

You don't really need a calligraphy course. I've been doing calligraphy since I was a kid, learning from books. Many calligraphy books teach extremely well. Calligraphy, however, is not necessarily practical, because it requires the use of a calligraphy pen. You don't have the kind of tips calligraphy pens have with regular pens and pencils. I ...


5

I have dysgraphia and I have much difficulty in writing legible characters at all. What has helped me the most was to use a different pen. To me the bulk of the pens are too thick and have a slide that I can't control, but I have found a type which has a much smaller tip and a scratching feeling when you pull it on the paper. This has helped me write much ...


5

At its heart, this is simply called "line art," and as DA01 states, halftone dots are really just a method to get a continuous tone (photograph etc) into line-art form for printing with a single ink. Map makers are usually free to choose the tones they use, but in some case, such as geological survey, the texture choices are formalized so as to represent ...


5

In depth technical learning requires extensive study. Far more than any "tutorial" will ever provide. There are several ways to get this type of knowledge: Seek articles online, NOT tutorials. Few, if any, tutorials will ever convey in-depth technical aspects of anything. The goal of a tutorial is to make you "oooo" and "ahhh" at the results and feel proud ...


5

You can't alter the pixel data on more than one layer at a time. That includes pixel data on masks. Heres how I'd handle it..... Create a Hue Adjustment Layer. This will have a mask on it. Paint on the adjustment layer mask to reveal where you want the Hue changes.... When done, hold down the Option/Alt key and click-drag the Layer Mask thumbnail from the ...


4

Practice makes your handwriting better. This is different from what most consider calligraphy. But in fact handwriting is where it starts. My normal hand is pretty horrible but there is one universally useful thing: Write Slowly We all know what the letters should look like. By slowing the pace, you give yourself time to do it the way you are supposed to ...


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