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Any font has built-in spacing determined by the "side bearing" of each character. In metal type, the side bearing is the physical right or left edge of the individual piece of type that determines its spacing from the characters on either side. Digital fonts mimic this in the basic design process. "To kern" means to adjust the spacing between a pair of ...


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Leaf Shape I found some results as Leaf Shape in graphic resources sites: Shutterstock ALLPPT.com Vexel Print4mee PNGTREE Modes4u


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A wireframe is about functionality. It can be a really simple sketch that demonstrates what sort of things you can do in your design. For example, a wireframe of a website will show the navigation, the main buttons, the columns, the placing of different elements. You can think of it as a blueprint for a website. A mockup is a realistic representation of ...


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From the Wikipedia article on letter spacing: In typography, letter-spacing, also called tracking, refers to the amount of space between a group of letters to affect density in a line or block of text. Letter-spacing can be confused with kerning. Letter-spacing refers to the overall spacing of a word or block of text affecting its overall density and ...


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They’re almost interchangeable – but there’s a difference of emphasis that can be useful. If you talk about the typeface, your focus is on the end result, some type’s appearance and aesthetics in use. It might have come from a font, or it might not: hand-painted signs, graffiti art, comic lettering, calligraphy, logos etc can all have distinctive typefaces ...


31

Well, its true that a rounded triangle works. Except the sides are also not straight so you wouldn't know also sides are rounded. However there is a mathematical shape that exhibits this kind of form. And that is a Epitrochoid. Image 1: a suitable set of Epitrochoid.* Therefore we could thus call these shapes 3 lobed Epitrochoid 4 lobed Epitrochoid etc. ...


29

I think you're either asking about a monospaced typeface – where each character has the same width – or the tabular lining opentype feature, which makes numbers the same width in typefaces where this feature available. This is useful for displaying alot of numbers in tables for instance, or when numbers need to align perfectly across multiple lines. Some ...


28

While perhaps not the "technical" term for it.. I see it often called a Pill Shape.


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Microsoft calls it a Round diagonal corner rectangle. Here are the names of various rectangles (one can confirm this for oneself by mouse-hovering over these shapes in e.g. Powerpoint or Word):


26

This is called ligature. There is some useful background knowledge on Wikipedia In writing and typography, a ligature occurs where two or more graphemes or letters are joined as a single glyph. Many ligatures combine f with an adjacent letter. The most prominent example is fi (or f‌i, rendered with two normal letters). The tittle of the i in many ...


24

Art is typically something that an artist designates as art, or society has deemed culturally important. It’s often a physical work (or just an idea) that had a certain aesthetic or intellectual intent. It’s purpose can vary, from being an outlet of personal expression, to excite the eyes, to set a mood/emotion, to provide commentary, etc. Design is ...


24

Very rarely. Any time you claim to be a professional X, you're staking your reputation on a claim to have specific, comprehensive expertise in that profession. With typography, some graphic designers can justify such a claim, but most can't stretch that far. "Typographer" implies professional expert. Most good designers are adept at typography, and many ...


23

While there is a Wikipedia entry for "graphist" (given anyone can add or edit Wikipedia), I would state that it's not a valid English word, at least not American English. It does not appear in the Meriam-Webster dictionary. In my (quite lengthy) career, I've never heard anyone use that term. Sounds similar to someone calling a plumber a "plumbist" or a ...


22

Combination marks According to 99designs there are seven types of logos*: Abstract Emblem Lettermark Mascots Pictorial Wordmark Combination marks A combination mark is a logo comprised of a combined wordmark or lettermark and a pictorial mark, abstract mark, or mascot. The conclusion would be combination mark + slogan. *These names usually vary ...


22

Stadium Shape As a geometric figure. A stadium is a geometric figure consisting of a rectangle with top and bottom lengths a whose ends are capped off with semicircles of radius r. Sources mathworld.wolfram.com/Stadium.html / mentalfloss.com Capsule Shape Following @Rafael's answer, there are many results in Google as Capsule Shape


19

I've been a designer for 8 years and I worked with many designers and artists. To summarize it quickly I would say: Artists are concerned about the design itself, they want to make something beautiful in their own way. Designers want to solve problems first, then to make it pretty according to the target and client.


19

Spurs A small projection off of a main stroke. See #15 here. Although most explanations will use an uppercase G to show a sample, they are still spurs when protruding from a primary stroke of any glyph.


19

About the style, Tuscan Fonts Tuscans can be described as decorative display faces with characteristics that usually include one or more of the following: bi- or trifurcated (branched) serifs or mannered stroke terminations (pointed, rounded, concaved, chiseled, wedged…); an active, energetic contour; and medial decoration. Tuscans can also be additively ...


18

"Margin" is the term for the area inset from the trim to the content. Another term possibly more related to bleed is "Safe area" (or similar). This is often smaller than any margins and is (similar to bleed) usually a small distance specified by the printer as an area to avoid placing content in as it will possibly be trimmed (since trimming is never as ...


18

The first thing that occurred to me was that the suggestion of type being shown in your example is certainly referred to as greeking. Searching “greeking used in loading screens” led me to multiple articles about this UX technique, and specifically this one which refers to the concept as a Content Placeholder. As good a term as any I think. So ...


17

Wireframes are rudimentary shapes or lines used to designate position and/or size only. The goal of any wireframe is to "fit" the elements into a layout, not indicate how elements may actually appear in a final design, only where they will be located. Mockups are built on top of wireframes and go further to show overall appearance aspects of a design ...


17

Type Family - You didn't mention this but it's important. The design of all the characters comprised of a family and all its encompassing faces. Helvetica is a type family. Helvetica Condensed is a type family, Myriad Pro is a type family, etc. Typeface - the specific weight or instance of a particular family. I.E. Bold, italic, oblique are all typefaces. ...


17

Polynomial simply means consisting of several terms, as opposed to binomial consisting of only two terms. In most cases, kerning is the spacing between pairs of characters (binomial). It is however possible and useful to apply kerning based on a larger string of characters (polynomial). This is called contextual kerning. (As far as I'm aware, the term ...


16

So, my question is: Does the difference between a 'font' and a 'typeface' subside in the language? Or are font and typeface now used interchangeably even by pros? Well, the two are still different. A font creates letters in a given typeface using a certain size and style. Typeface refers to the overall design of the letter shapes, and not to any specific ...


16

It's a DuPont proprietary colour proofing process. It was originally a photographic process. They now have a digital version -- basically a colour-calibrated high-res inkjet print. I haven't actually heard the term used in the fully digital (computer to plate) era though. Maybe there are just a lot more options from competitors these days. Anyway, it's ...


16

"Squircle" was a random mash-up someone somewhere came up with and it became trendy. But a square with rounded corners, is still a square. And a circle with any corner is no longer a circle. There are no specific names for the shapes merely because they have rounded corners. A triangle is still a triangle regardless of how round the corners may be. The ...


16

The style of embedding illustrations within a text block or floating on a page of a book surrounded by text or other design items is not a characteristic of the illustration itself. The illustrations themselves simply have no background. The images "float" on a featureless background. You might say they are "in limbo." Often, normal square framed ...


16

Catchwords Catchwords have always been offered alongside standard alphabets in wood type catalogs and so often appear on posters as a decorative punch that they have become part of the wood type vernacular. Words like 'The', 'And', 'To', 'For', and less common abbreviations could be inserted into a design along with decorative ornaments or stars when ...


15

After some digging, I found it is called a catchword. Read more about it here: https://english.stackexchange.com/questions/65963/in-old-books-why-is-the-first-word-of-the-next-page-printed-at-the-bottom-of-th I always assumed this was to improve readability, as the reader could continue more seamlessly onto the following page, but it turns out it was also ...


15

If you ask someone in the publishing world what they are called they will point you to what's called a "Chapter Ornament" or a "Book Ornament". If you want to get further technical on the design process, book designers will refer to them if they are at the beginning of a chapter as a "Chapter Heading Ornament" or at the end of the chapter as a "End of ...


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