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0

Having come across this problem myself, I find that the css colour orangered or #FF4500 works well on almost any colour background that is not reddish or orangeish.


3

Highlight the text layer... and choose Type > Convert to Shape from the menu. The live text will then be converted to a shape layer and be paths with no direct connection to the original font.


0

Create master pages with the different color backgrounds that you can easily drag into place. And create paragraph or character styles for the different text colors.


2

If the text should only be white you could use the effects-panel. select the textframe you want to have white, go to effects and change the transparency of the text to negative multiplication. If you want to have the inverted color you could also use difference (but it's not that readable). I'm afraid, I couldn't find a way to give it a specific color but ...


1

I would go with Photoshop and use cmd shift X (liquify). Select the font layer. Rasterize it. CMD SHIFT X (or filters -> liquify). Just use a smaller brush and play around with pulling around.


3

If it's a title or simple word's text, a possible workaround is making a group of shapes with the gradients and using the text as a mask. Edit the mask to change the text Unlink the mask to change the gradient shapes position. Change each gradient selecting each shape with the Group Selection Tool Once done, link the mask to move or transform the title


3

You can't. At least not as one single text object. If you want separate gradients on separate glyphs, you either need separate text objects or to create outlines of the text and then fill the individual (expanded) shapes. Gradients which span/cover all the glyphs within a text object are absolutely possible, but not for singular glyphs. Text objects will ...


0

In this particular case, the face removal doesn't worry me in the slightest. If the product is care-based rather than medicine-technology-based it's even an improvement. Quite different to the example @Matt offered (below) where the sidelining of the woman is open to so many levels of criticism! I certainly wouldn't suggest a general 'keep the face' rule.


34

When advertising, especially something which involves the human condition such as medical care, you want the viewer to be engaged and connected as much as possible. Human faces tend to soften advertising and if the faces appear kind, welcoming, engaged, themselves, then viewers tend to subconsciously pick up on that and somewhat empathize with those emotions....


17

A patch is always a scar on an image The question is wrongly formulated. You are taking for granted the existence of another component as something of correct use and valid as a design element in any image: a patch. I think before asking if you behead a character inside an image with a patch, you should ask: Is it necessary to use a patch over an image? ...


2

Yes and No! => when it comes to branding all thing you should keep in mind and keep focused is = Brand name ; logo and what it clearly does or for what it is made (purpose) . and to achieve this you can do anything if your placed image is working as background (less focused) but in your case the branding doesn't contain some main elements like logo etc so ...


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