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0

Check your layer stack order, object stack order and opacity setting of the text object.


1

U+00B7 can also represent multiplication. 5·5 = 25


0

Try to reset your text type. If that doesn't work, maybe try increasing the font size. Your text looks tiny in your first screenshot.


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If you want your content to be copy+paste-able into a calculator then use the asterisk * Aside from that you should use whatever is consistent with the locale you're targeting. Heck, 2 x 3 can be represented by 2(3) but depending on your audience it may not be appropriate.


3

If your application target a community of developer, you can also use the * sign. This asterisk symbol is commonly used by programming languages to do multiplication. You can find it on wikipedia


24

U+2715 (“Multiplikation X”) is in the Dingbats block. Therefore, it’s for ornamental usage (if anything) and not for communicating mathematical relations. There is no reason to expect that any font renders it in a way that would be appropriate for a mathematical operator, in particular I would expect it to be to bold and large for this purpose. Using it for ...


2

I have actually been faced with this issue a few times in my design work, and eventually ended up using the smaller × every single time. About using this on a Mac, you can probably google that, also you need to make sure this character exists in the font you are using. Some fonts have a limited character set and may not include the ×.


1

This is the basic technique I have used so far: Image degradation Dilate the text a little (because the text is black on white it's actually an erode, but it makes the text "fatter") Add Gaussian noise (with various different amplitudes) Clip the image values Blur the images Threshold the images Erode the result, with various different values (...


1

h1 SPACER h2 SPACER p SPACER h2 SPACER p If all this is part of the same text box, then use paragraph spacing with identical 'Space After' value for all styles (h1, h2, p) as mentioned by Julian. This should be the more efficint way. The less efficient way, but I believe this is what you're trying to do here.. if you're planning to have separate text boxes ...


0

Not sure if I understand your question correctly. But is sounds like you need to use "Paragraph Spacing" for this. You can set this in the paragraph panel, the top bar or double-click on the paragraph style. Best way is through paragraph styles, as that allows to change all spacings together and makes sure they are all the same.


2

To make a convincing simulation of a scanned page from a 1700s printed book, you'll need to study and analyze each step of the process it has went through. Since there is a variety in how scanned pages look, you'll have to determine some parameters you can randomize to create diverse samples. I thought the whole idea with machine learning was to be able to ...


1

I would suggest a combination of blurring, resharpening and texture overlays. You should find some suitable textures if you search "grunch texture" (probably then reverse them and overlay with blending mode "screen") Here an example original text on the left text with filters on the right...


1

This is pretty easily done with the free Windows app Paint.net. What you want to do is open your picture in Paint.net. Then according to the screenshot below, you'll want to: click on the menu "Adjustments" and select "Levels". Then you remove the histogram hump at from your picture (this hump corresponds to the gray background behind ...


0

I'm a new user here myself but found this dilemma while looking thru. With my somewhat limited scope, I don't see the image as pixelated. When looking at the image you posted, the image is breaking up and even within the type, there seems to be a grain showing thru. From what I read, you're creating the image in 300 ppi which is what print demands and you're ...


2

You'll need to do some manual editing to get a result like that. Don't think there is anyway to do this fully automatically. I'll let you be the judge whether manual editing, then using OCR, will be quicker than simply retyping the text. If you don't have Photoshop, get GIMP it's free. Using the rectangle select tool, click and drag to select the entire ...


0

Okay looks like I had copied the same box a bunch of time that had an extra line break with no text on it. Ooops.


2

I don't really understand to be honest. Yes, the different resizing methods alter type differently. To me, this is somewhat like asking... "...if a click a red swatch, everything gets colored red. If I click a yellow swatch, everything gets colored yellow. How can I make everything red when I click a yellow swatch?" The answer is you can't. Nor ...


0

Not much to be said here. In order to keep the glyphs correct you need to ... Hold SHIFT. :)


0

Cut the text from the textbox to the clipboard and paste it back after the box is resized. Selecting the text, Ctrl+X before resizing and Ctrl+V after resizing should not be especially much. Unfortunately it doesn't work if your text is a continuous chunk which is divided to several tied textboxes. Another workaround: Place guides and drag the edges of the ...


1

Thanks to the comment above and the linked answer by @xenoid, I found the font and installing it solved the issue. The Python Console is accessible under Filters/Python-Fu, where the object representing the open image can be found with img = gimp.image_list()[0] (0 of course being the index of the open image). From there, one can select the text layer (layer ...


8

Notice how all lines are either vertical or rotated 45°. This image follow a regular square grid, so it's easy to construct manually. Enter Edit > Preferences > Guides & Grid to set up the grid as you prefer. (Here I'm in a print document and have set Grid > Gridline every to 10 mm.) Make sure the grid is visible with View > Show Grid. ...


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