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1

For a non-destructive solution, you could use a Clipping Mask. Duplicate the circle, place it on top of the text, select both the duplicated circle and the text and use Object → Clipping Mask → Make. A non-destructive workflow will allow you to edit the text later if needed.


2

No need to outline the U. Create a square artboard or a slice in the size you need, center your design in that and then Save for Web that artboard or slice. You can switch on transparency in the PNG export dialogue.


1

Create outlines as the others suggested, but also keep a copy of the U or the entire artwork before converting to outlines. It may be useful for the future to keep an editable version.


5

^ I also recommend using the 'create outlines' shortcut as Danielillo mentioned above, but wanted to add that you can find the tool in the menu bar under Type>Create Outlines. It is probably important to note that in 'creating outlines,' the letter 'U' will be reformatted into a vector object (outlined paths), so you will no longer be able to alter/edit it ...


8

Select the text and press Cmd + Shift + O Mac or Ctrl + Shift + O Win to convert the text to outline.


-1

Its because You have to colorise to BlacK100 ungroupped EAN lines as outlines.


0

Just select all your text layers you want to change and simply change their text properties like you normally would.


2

Check your paragraph settings. You might have applied Left Indent: (It could also be cause by an object we can't see with Text Wrap applied.)


0

Art Text (Mac-only) is also a great tool if you don't want to get into a full 3D modelling program.


2

The problem you have is related to the First Baseline Offset setting of the text frame. You can access the Text Frame Options of a text frame by by selecting it and either right-clicking it and choosing Text Frame Options or pressing Cmd + B on Mac or Ctrl + B on PC. Under the Baseline Options tab you'll find the First Baseline > Offset which specifies the ...


-2

First, make the frame fit the text dimensions with button 1 Second, align both with vertical middle with button 2


3

I have to deal with this somewhat regularly, with input from designers wanting things to break a certain way. I've found the most straightforward way to do this is to put a span with a class inside the text, and then have that span be display: block; for the media queries. So it would look something like this: <p>This is some text and I want <...


0

Alternate answer: In Adobe Illustrator, you could use envelope distort and leave the text fully editable: The red trapezoid is on top - with a multiply transparency blend mode to make visibility easier: with the text and the trapezoid both selected, go to Menu>Object>Envelope Distort>Make with Top Object - like so: This gives us this result, which looks a ...


0

I know this was posted 2 years ago but I have been noticing this problem with a client's template lately. I found it. It is hidden in Text Frame Options > Baseline Options. First Baseline should be set to "Ascent" and not "Leading" as mine was. This fixed it for me!


2

One a fast answer could be "apply perspective!". But that's not the same. Horizontal dimensions have stayed intact, the stretching is vertical. Perspective affects all dimensions. In Illustrator you can get the right result with Effect > Distort & Transform > Free Distort: In the Free Distort dialog simply drag the right side corners vertically. If ...


0

Select T to add a text Rasterize the text by right click on the layer > Rasterize go to Photoshop menu bar > Window > Liquefy and with the first option on the top left corner selected, adjust the size of the brush and the pressure


2

Menu Image → Adjustment → Threshold


1

Since the provided script is for Photoshop (there's a textItem), I'll go with Photoshop answer. This script doesn't account for text scale: and if your text layer explodes this is probably because it was scaled. For some reason, there's an obscure property inside text layers in Photoshop that's used for calculations: basically if you've typed text in 15pt ...


2

A little late to the party, but I found that if you Print to File File → Print → Print to File, it works fine. This was on an Ubuntu machine, but this prevented me having to turn the text into un-editable objects.


0

A workaround: Scale manually. Have the content grouped and use the handle which scales the content, too. Have another artboard which has exact dimensions and snap to it.


0

If you have the text available in InDesign, you can simply highlight the text with the Info window (Window > Info) open and it'll tell you characters, words, lines and paragraphs. I agree that there should be a way to have a word count in illustrator - but perhaps that's because if you have 150 words on a document, InDesign is a better option for layout ...


2

You can copy that text content and paste it into MS Word, or Notepad++ or a blank Google Drive document. All of these tools have a built-in word count tool. Kind of a work around if you don't want to leave Illustrator: Do a Find/Replace and replace every space with a $ sign or some character you don't already have in your document. Hit Replace All and then ...


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