6

Trapping is normally done by the print house and in most cases the designer doesn't need to worry too much about this. But of course there is no rule without exceptions. It's hard to reduce graphic design to a set of rules. It's better to learn the background for the rules so you can make better decisions yourself, so I have to explain a bit. Please note ...


5

You don't mention which printing method you are going to use, so I'll assume you mean ordinary offset print. The type of paper and the size of the sheets also matter. I've had luck with small white text on rich black background on a record cover which was printed on small sheets, but if I were to make a book which I knew would printed on larger sheets, I ...


3

It does not really matter all that much how deep the notch is, just as long that its wider than a pixel. What you have here Is certainly wide enough for most relevant view sizes. When going to use extremely small sizes you need to massage the individual pixels anyway to achieve a good look. So most likely the depth of the notch is one keyboard nudge sized ...


3

put your varnishes on the topmost layers--each on a separate layer--do not trap! the print provider will handle it in a way that's best for their process. note: I work in prepress (30 years+) we do not trap varnishes--we do however use a variety of processes depending on the press--sometimes we use what's called a 'strike thru' varnish--the gloss is applied ...


3

If you're in the print field and have access to a RIP, you should be able to get this done through the RIP, and even use these files back. The transparency effect you're looking for is the "multiply" blending mode in Photoshop, and below it you would add a white duplicate of your image a bit smaller to imitate a fake trapping. The problem is Photoshop will ...


2

The trap (or grip as some people like to call it) should be a continuation of the shape that you are trapping, so the overlapping area should always be the same colour and tint as the rest of the shape. To put to another way; If you were to take away the object that your shape is trapping to, then it should just look like a slightly larger / expanded ...


2

The way you'll make sure overprinting is applied is simply by adding your background color to the color recipe of your gray illustration. Background CMYK + Gray CMYK = Fake Overprint of the gray. If the gray is a rich gray, you don't need to literally add the ink; as long the gray contains the same value or more of yellow/cyan/magenta than your background, ...


2

Make sure the frame has the same fill color as the background and set Stroke > Align Stroke to Align Stroke to Inside. See here how a double stroke should react with the available 3 settings:


2

There is no universally accepted practice. It is true that the background is not white but transparent. However not all printhouses react the same way. There are at least 3 different ways they can handle this. You need to talk with your printer and ask how they prefer to handle this. Then because even printers are human and more importantly the printer you ...


1

There is a problem when expanding such images, and exporting to PDF, because there is a rendering problem with Adobe Reader when two objects are butted together like that. There are several questions regarding these rendering issues with vectors here on GDSE - I can't find them right now, but if someone here can remember the questions, there may be answers ...


1

That is correct. For trapping to be applied you need to File > Print to have it applied. However, InDesign’s Attributes palette lets you control overprinting. Or you can even use InDesign’s built-in trapping feature by printing separations to disk.


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