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At its core, There isn't really anything wrong with Comic Sans. It was designed for a purpose - comic-book-style speech bubbles primarily. It did a good job at that - if you're going to have Microsoft Bob talk to you on a screen, Comic Sans feels more 'right' than Times New Roman. Three things have contributed to Comic Sans' unpopularity, in my view. First,...


154

There are technical, compatibility, legal, authenticity, and subjective reasons for not using it. I'm going to go through each in turn listing out the reasons with examples and references. Starting with: Hitler freaks out over Comic Sans Technical Reasons There are a handful of purely technical reasons not to use it. The first, was a lack of italic ...


136

They do. The thing is, you probably don't realise, because upper case numbers have been all you've been using or seeing. There is a distinction between 'default' numbers and 'oldstyle' numbers. The default numbers we all know are the actual capitals, with the 'oldstyle' numbers (sometimes incorrectly called 'proportional numbers') are lowercase. Fonts tend ...


81

I would explain to them that although it is "technically" a font. In this case they should see the logo not as a "word written in a font" but as "typographic word-mark". Ask them to consider the Coca Cola word-mark. Would Coca Cola write body text in that style? No. I think the key terminology for you here is word-mark. A second idea, dodgy at best, is to ...


49

Comic Sans is a poorly made font because it succeeds neither at resembling actual comic book handwriting, nor printed lettering. For comparison, here is a well designed comic book font called Crimefighter BB. The above example is italicized and all caps, so while a great font for comics, it is not exactly all-purpose. But there are plenty of other great ...


48

They’re almost interchangeable – but there’s a difference of emphasis that can be useful. If you talk about the typeface, your focus is on the end result, some type’s appearance and aesthetics in use. It might have come from a font, or it might not: hand-painted signs, graffiti art, comic lettering, calligraphy, logos etc can all have distinctive typefaces ...


46

While upper case numbers do exist, as is shown in vincents answer. They did not originally exist at all. Remember our numbers are copied from the Muslim scientists, who wrote in Arabic.* Arabic is unicase, that is all letters are same case. So the notion of big and small numbers is a later development. Since the original system had no case so did the ...


40

You can't use tattoo art as a reference. Tattoo art often fails to follow any rhyme or reasoning. It's always a one-off and created with the intention of a very narrow audience, not broader viewing. (And there's always someone at hand to immediately say: "No, it says xxxx.") Bad design happens. There's no "Global Design Tribunal" which determines what one ...


39

I think Helvetica's biggest strength (and thus is greatest weakness) is just how "neutral" of a typeface it is. It really can work well in all sorts of situations and applications because of how balanced and neutral it is. But by the same token, it becomes "bland" - the office beige color of typefaces. I would never say Helvetica is superior to any other ...


37

Could be ok for a text, but for a logo it has some flaws. The advantage of this case is that all joints are between a straight stroke and a curve stroke. Taking x as a reference kerning between the straight and the curve, all the red arrows shows different separations. This is my tip: imagine this logo like a giant construction on a wall, small mistakes ...


35

Typefaces become popular for a number of reasons, partly technology (which often drives fashion -- "Because I can" is a more potent driver than most people realize), partly the cultural milieu within which they fit and become associated, partly the mood they invoke (or don't). The grotesks in general arrived on the typographic scene at a time when Western ...


32

Two quick tips for checking kerning... squinting your eyes, and inverting the text... by doing this you can focus more on the contrast and white-space and be less distracted by the actual letters themselves. This confirms what I thought when I first saw it - Looks OK to me. Edit - A comment above drew attention to a previous answer which includes my ...


31

Fonts like this are called glyphic serif. But since for example Optima is widely considered a sans serif, I don’t think it would be wrong to say the same for Marcellus. By the way: The German font classification system (DIN 16518) considers fonts like this to be Antiqua-Variants. Antiqua-fonts that can’t be classified clearly as serif or sans-serif go in ...


29

While this is primarily a list of sites, know that browsing a website is not the only way to look for typefaces. Some type foundries still publish specimen catalogs, and some now have mobile apps and Adobe plugins. Many will also have e-mail newsletters to update on new things. MyFonts FontFont Typophile Letterhead Fonts Linotype FontShop – A great ...


28

How you write is like how you dress. It's not about practicality, it's about how you present yourself. It reflects how much thought and effort you put into your appearance. It strongly influences your audience's first impression before you even open your mouth, and it colors what you have to say throughout the presentation. In this metaphor, Futura would be ...


25

Objectively you've already mostly answered it in your question: neutral In that it's 'plain' and not overly decorated, this is certainly true. Helvetica in a lot of situations doesn't impart any additional meaning (intentional or otherwise) beyond the words it is forming. well-glyphed I'm not sure I've heard that particular term before, but I ...


24

The construction of fonts changed after the 50s with the Swiss International Typographic Style. The International Typographic Style has had profound influence on graphic design as a part of the modernist movement, impacting many design-related fields including architecture and art. It emphasizes cleanness, readability, and objectivity. Many of the ...


23

What is case? The discussion both in this question and in the one it inspired on ELU seems to conflate two distinct meanings of ‘uppercase’ and ‘lowercase’: Based purely on shape and size, originating in whether a glyph was originally usually stored in the typographer’s upper or lower case (= drawer). Based on functionality, describing what upper- and ...


22

There's nothing wrong using Comic Sans when it's appropriate: for comics (duh), informal publications, and applications targeted towards children. It's meant to have both legible and handwritten attributes. Here are two completely legitimate examples: Since it's a font that comes packaged with Windows and the majority of users don't download or install ...


21

Capital letters exist as our written and printed language has decided they should. The rules for usage of capital letters typically is for starting sentences and proper nouns. The rules simply don't apply to numerals. Hence, no need for there to be 'upper case' numbers. Your example of using ALL CAPS TO SHOW EMPHASIS is actually not an ideal way to show ...


20

The right leg is reduced for thicker weights, eg. bolds and blacks, probably as optical corrections. Basicly, the thicker the weight, the smaller the leg. Myfonts offers a live preview where you type in your own text and they set this up in all the weights, so you can easily see the difference. Regular vs. black below (blue), then it gets proper straight ...


19

You should supply with the identity a brand guidelines and usage document. Good branding relies on consistency and without clear codified usage guidelines then consistency is next to impossible. Logo usage and accompanying typography guidelines should be laid out clearly and any relevant font files* supplied with the guidelines. Your answer to such requests ...


18

Summed up into a couple of points, here are my thoughts on the subject. "Readability" is also about what we are most familiar with. English speakers tend to be familiar with both serif and sans-serif typefaces, enough to be able to read both extremely fluently. You could say that most of our most lengthy reading (eg, novels, newspapers) uses traditional/...


18

Comic Sans MS scores extremely well in readability, particularly for educational content (like Higgs-Boson announcement): Fortune favors the bold (and the Italicized): Effects of disfluency on educational outcomes Which Fonts Do Children Prefer to Read Online? Only designers really take issue with Comic Sans MS because of how it is designed breaking ...


18

Using Comic Sans in your Powerpoint presentation at a TED Talk is the equivalent of wearing a Sponge Bob T-Shirt and a pair of sweat pants while giving your Powerpoint presentation. There's nothing wrong with a cartoon t-shirt and pair of sweat pants. They are comfortable. Versatile. Affordable. But simply 'say' the wrong thing for a TED talk. When people ...


16

So, my question is: Does the difference between a 'font' and a 'typeface' subside in the language? Or are font and typeface now used interchangeably even by pros? Well, the two are still different. A font creates letters in a given typeface using a certain size and style. Typeface refers to the overall design of the letter shapes, and not to any specific ...


16

Received typographic wisdom holds that Blackletter ("Old English", "Gothic") text only looks good in lower case or with initial capitalization — never with capital letters in series If you ask me (and all sources I have ever read about the matter), the problem is not that all-caps blackletter does not look good. It just is very difficult to read due to the ...


15

Subtle differences look like careless mistakes and sloppiness, not just in fonts but in all designs. When things are just slightly off, its enough people notice, but not enough people think its a deliberate thought out decision. Here is Arial Black with Source Sans Pro Semibold. They clash because they're both trying to be clean sans-serif fonts and in ...


14

Capitals with curves are designed slightly larger than the other letters to counteract an optical illusion, which otherwise would make those letters look too small, even though in reality they wouldn't be. Here is an example. The top image is the original unaltered font. The bottom I have altered to make the top and bottom of the C match the letters A and E ...


13

When I'm in the audience, a presentation in Comic Sans just makes me feel like like the presenter is thinking I'm stupid, like I'm at the wrong place. It's like being talked to in Simple English. Imagine attending a talk on Haskell and the presenter starts with "We want to write letters on our computer that tell our computer what to do." — it's just ...


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