83 votes
Accepted

How to explain to a client the font in their logo is not to be used for anything else

I would explain to them that although it is "technically" a font. In this case they should see the logo not as a "word written in a font" but as "typographic word-mark". Ask them to consider the Coca ...
mayersdesign's user avatar
  • 8,552
40 votes

Is all-caps blackletter no longer taboo?

You can't use tattoo art as a reference. Tattoo art often fails to follow any rhyme or reasoning. It's always a one-off and created with the intention of a very narrow audience, not broader viewing. (...
Scott's user avatar
  • 209k
32 votes
Accepted

Is that a good kerning?

Two quick tips for checking kerning... squinting your eyes, and inverting the text... by doing this you can focus more on the contrast and white-space and be less distracted by the actual letters ...
mayersdesign's user avatar
  • 8,552
21 votes

Why don't any common typefaces use ascenders or descenders on capital letters (except Q and sometimes J), even though they make text easier to read?

I think the premise of this question is incorrect, i.e. that lower case letters with descenders/ascenders evolved to make reading easier. Our modern lower case letters evolved from Latin half-uncial ...
Billy Kerr's user avatar
  • 86.3k
19 votes

How to explain to a client the font in their logo is not to be used for anything else

You should supply with the identity a brand guidelines and usage document. Good branding relies on consistency and without clear codified usage guidelines then consistency is next to impossible. Logo ...
Cai's user avatar
  • 40.6k
19 votes
Accepted

Helvetica: trailing leg in lowercase "a"

The right leg is reduced for thicker weights, eg. bolds and blacks, probably as optical corrections. Basicly, the thicker the weight, the smaller the leg. Myfonts offers a live preview where you type ...
Lucian's user avatar
  • 29.3k
18 votes

Is all-caps blackletter no longer taboo?

Received typographic wisdom holds that Blackletter ("Old English", "Gothic") text only looks good in lower case or with initial capitalization — never with capital letters in series If you ask me (...
Wrzlprmft's user avatar
  • 14.8k
18 votes

How do I protect a typeface I have designed from being pirated?

There is no technical way to protect the typeface. So law is the only thing that is protecting you. The font program itself (the OTF file) is protected by copyright but the resulting marks are not ...
joojaa's user avatar
  • 57.9k
18 votes

Printing: will a font always give exactly the same result, regardless of how it's printed?

The easy stripped down answer is no. There are so many software variables, print driver variables, and even font VERSION variables, that it is very difficult to say exactly WHY a font looks different....
Alith7's user avatar
  • 1,630
14 votes
Accepted

Is there a font that has the same height for every character?

Capitals with curves are designed slightly larger than the other letters to counteract an optical illusion, which otherwise would make those letters look too small, even though in reality they wouldn'...
Billy Kerr's user avatar
  • 86.3k
14 votes
Accepted

Why don't any common typefaces use ascenders or descenders on capital letters (except Q and sometimes J), even though they make text easier to read?

Readability is always a trade-off between (untrained) pattern recognition and what readers are already used to. Any force in the direction of better readability has to overcome the friction of people ...
Wrzlprmft's user avatar
  • 14.8k
13 votes
Accepted

What is the actual problem with Calibri?

I agree with some of the other answers here that there really isn't a problem per se and that visually, Calibri can hold its own as a default system font. Here are some of the problems I've had with ...
zeethreepio's user avatar
  • 4,076
13 votes
Accepted

Printing: will a font always give exactly the same result, regardless of how it's printed?

This is a well-known problem with font design; it has been a problem for over a hundred years. Fonts look much lighter when they're printed on coated paper than on uncoated book paper. It's ...
Copilot's user avatar
  • 4,321
12 votes
Accepted

What are the different stroke widths (e.g. in a W) in serif fonts called, and why do they have a particular orientation?

It's called "Stress" and it's a remnant from when letters where hand-written by calligraphers and not yet printed by press. A Brief Anatomy of Type I: Stress The answer is really rather simple, ...
Vicki's user avatar
  • 3,184
12 votes

How to explain to a client the font in their logo is not to be used for anything else

I much prefer to design type as much as any symbology in a logo. Therefore, although type may be based upon some particular typeface, it's generally not a straight out "font". So, if asked "what font ...
Scott's user avatar
  • 209k
11 votes

What makes a font a "gothic" font?

The question has been appropriately answered but I felt I could demystify this ambiguity between "Gothic" referring to Sans-Serif or Blackletter typefaces. It really depends on the context of the word ...
Jojo's user avatar
  • 136
11 votes

What is the actual problem with Calibri?

I think the main factor at work here is the fact that it's default. Just like Arial before it, Calibri is the default typeface in Microsoft Office. Hence, anyone who doesn't care about typeface will ...
Vincent's user avatar
  • 25.2k
11 votes

Typeface like Times New Roman but with "tied" percent sign

There are probably hundreds of fonts which fits your description, so finding one that fits your taste might be like searching for a needle in a haystack. I assume that the font needs to be free, so I ...
Wolff's user avatar
  • 20.9k
11 votes

How do I protect a typeface I have designed from being pirated?

Forgetting about copyright and legal measures, I think people will have the intention to pirate a typeface as a last resort. In fact, I have first hand experience with this. My team and I were working ...
Niz Hab's user avatar
  • 119
9 votes
Accepted

How do typefaces become taboo?

I think its several different issues that make designers "hate" a font, and they often get clumped together Bad quality. If a font is badly designed, then it will stick out. Amateur designers often ...
spiral's user avatar
  • 7,361
9 votes

What is an expert set in the fonts field?

There is no standard definition of "Pro" or "Expert" fonts. It was a term that started in the early 2000's when many foundries updated their fonts to include a wider character range and OpenType ...
spiral's user avatar
  • 7,361
9 votes
Accepted

In a typeface, what does the abbreviation PE mean?

PE stands for Pan-European and refers to the character set or variety of glyphs you will find in the font. For example, there is an interesting article about the development of Skolar Sans PE here: ...
curious's user avatar
  • 8,471
9 votes

Are tittles ("i" and "j") ascenders?

Typographic terminology needs not be as rigorously defined as say mathematical terminology. Nobody is going to make statements like: “If and only if a glyph has ascenders, its left kerning must be ...
Wrzlprmft's user avatar
  • 14.8k
8 votes

Why are there so many variations on the ampersand design?

Modern letter forms are the product of a combination of tradition, technical considerations, readability considerations, and interactions between handwriting and printed texts as well as between ...
Wrzlprmft's user avatar
  • 14.8k
8 votes

What is the actual problem with Calibri?

This seems like a trend thing. since calibri is packed with microsoft office since 2007 on, it is getting a bit overused and people are grabbing it to put it in stuff not office-related. Calibri is ...
Micalatéia's user avatar
8 votes

Is this Dutch IJ ligature suitable and readable to native speakers?

That lowercase ij is awesome 😄 My first thought was, "wow, low bridge ahead" – but I had a hunch it was to fit in with the rest of descending characters, and so it does. You even use this on the ...
Jongware's user avatar
  • 4,238
8 votes

How to know which second typeface should be used, given a contextual typeface?

There's a vague guideline: contrast in some aspects, lack of contrast in others. You want your reader to be able to smoothly read on, but you want the difference in typeface to be clearly noticeable ...
Vincent's user avatar
  • 25.2k

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