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6

The short answer is yes (if you're using Typekit legitimately as part of your subscription to Adobe CC). Here are a couple of useful FAQs directly from the Typekit site: Can I use synced fonts for commercial projects or client work, such as creating business cards and logos? Yes. You can create digital designs or print work for your own use or for ...


6

My understanding is No. The page view cap is there to gain further money for Adobe if you need more page views. It has absolutely nothing to do with bandwidth or foundry licensing. Adobe has plenty of servers and bandwidth to serve everything and they are the foundry. Adobe would see embedding a Typekit font, with anything other than their own embed code, ...


4

You can't transfer the fonts without cheating, breaking the law, or paying for them. The school should have a license. If the school can't afford it, then you as the designer should have asked about this and chosen free fonts to avoid exactly this situation. It's your responsibility as the designer to make yourself aware of the cost and copyright issues ...


4

Std - Standard or the base weight/form(s) of the typeface - often includes 1 regular or medium face, 1 bold face, then associated italics - good for any use Display - Generally refers to a typeface designed for use in headlines or display areas. Not widely used for large areas of text due to low readability/legibility at smaller sizes. (These include, but ...


3

Google Font's version of it would be Libre Franklin. There are some small differences but it's very close.


3

You can do something which do not need money to make your work more likely to stay around be reusable and be available for research. Consider to do the following: export your design as InDesign version independent format make a package that contains all linked material make two PDFs - one for long time archiving with all fonts as curves or bitmaps, ...


3

In short, two good rules of thumb: Don't use a font professionally without knowing what the license is. Assume a font has a license and go find it. IANAL. From a legal standpoint, fonts are treated like software when it comes to licensing. That's why I can't e-mail you a Helvetica font file, but I can create a line of text with your name on it, outline it, ...


3

I'd go with a classic Helvetica/Garamond blend - it's a proven classic. For a quick look at combos that work, I typically use http://bonfx.com/wp-content/uploads/2009/09/19-top-fonts-in-19-top-combinations-chart.pdf If you are looking to build your unique combination I can recommend reading: http://www.smashingmagazine.com/2010/11/04/best-practices-of-...


3

Yes, this is correct. Adobe Edge Web Fonts is a free service from Adobe, an "open"-like equivalent for Typekit. It uses the same structure and works the same way, but it's free. However, fonts available there are usually lower quality or very well-known open license type families.


3

I did some more research on licensing and came across the following: Can I use Typekit web fonts for anything other than a website? No. Our web font license requires that the fonts be added to a website with the Typekit embed code. If the website or web app is viewed in the browser (either on the desktop or on a mobile device), it's covered by ...


2

I think the style is called Geometric Design or minimal design(even though not all of them use thin typeface) search for geometric POSTER design, geometric WEBSITE design and geometric BROCHURE design on image search sites (pinterest & google images are my Go To sites for this) and you should get plenty of examples https://www.pinterest.com/explore/...


2

In my experience I believe Typekit is the place to go if you are in dire need for "the" font that will stand up for your brand or your client's brand. Google fonts is still a class apart, but it is only in its nascent stage. In a few years time, it will be hosting a whole lot of fonts. I would like you to check out these interesting reads. Typekit review ...


2

if I have a font on my computer that doesn't say "Non-commercial use only" or something like that can I put it on web without a problem? Unfortunately not. Web embedding is one use for which you'd need a separate, specific license. Why? Most times when you use a font, as long as you have the font file on your computer legally and are using it according ...


1

https://forums.adobe.com/thread/1892161 Each Typekit account licenses the account owner to sync fonts through their personal Adobe ID. It isn't possible to share a single Typekit account with the rest of your office. and Typekit does not have kit sharing capabilities at this time, though we're looking into it as a possibility for the future.


1

Everyone in your team who has a Cloud account should have equal access to TypeKit. However, the fonts have to be manually installed to each individual computer. So, when one of your users opens a document and gets a message that the font is missing, they can use the "Sync" option in their "Find Font" window, and their computer will go out and search for the ...


1

You can use them but you can't legally sell them or give them to others. Sounds a piece of bullshit, doesn't it? But it isn't! If you use Typekit fonts (or any other copyrighted font) in writings or artwork files and sell or give yor work to somebody as a file, not as a printed paper, then very likely the file is not viewable "as -is" until there is the ...


1

I want to start off agreeing with all the comments so far - your school should definitely have a subscription to Creative Cloud that includes Typekit. However, I understand your dilemma as my university did not provide it either. Possible solution... Have you tried packaging the InDesign file? Usually that creates a handy little "Fonts" folder within the ...


1

According to this very interesting article, one of the issues between Photoshop kerning and CSS kerning is that Photoshop doesn't show the unit used for the letter spacing setting. The value is based on the font-size, and the article's author claims to have found that a value in Photoshop of 1000 is equal to 1em in CSS. X / 1000 = Y Where X is the value ...


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