24

Mainly because: The dash is not part of people's keyboard. But the weird hyphen/minus character is (I mean ideally we would use minus for minus and hyphen for hyphen but that is just how it is). Most people do not know about typography. It's not terribly wrong in the general audience's opinion either. So saying it is incorrect is slightly stretching things ...


14

This is a small item, so avoid filling precious whitespace by containing every element into its own separate box. Instead, break the design down into 2 sections for better separation between the top part (general overview) and bottom part (detailed 'specs'). For instance, you could leave the top against a white background, and only use the yellowish ...


11

This is an opinion based answer, and there is no right or wrong here. Generally, I quite like the basic style of it. It's very traditional in a kind of educational establishment way. However in my opinion the main problem here is the way you have listed the various features centred on two lines. I don't think there's anything wrong with the fonts. It's just ...


10

I think it is simply called an end mark: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/End_mark


8

I can't see how orphans and widows can ever be a "good thing". They should in my opinion always be avoided, but in some cases you can be forced to accept them because the alternative is worse. Why are orphans and widows a bad thing? It always hurts my eyes to see those tiny snippets of text. It looks like an unintentional error. In this example we have ...


8

Designing how a page should look is usually called layout and is not usually considered a part of typography but typography is often considered a necessary skill to do a good page layout. Page layout requires a good sense of composition. Normally one would be required to compose not just text but also graphics, photographs, background color and/or images ...


8

12 point text on A1 paper is the same size as 12 point text on A4 (or Letter) Try holding up a printed sample and see at what distance you can read it. Then imagine the same A4 paper tiled in a 2x4 matrix - do you need to see/read all the corners at once? That should give you a practical example of how big it will be and how readable the fonts are at that ...


8

I've found three sources mentioning this technique. Beadnell, Henry: A guide to typography, in two parts, literary and practica, 1859, p. 165-166: De Vinne, Theodore Low: The practice of typography; modern methods of book composition, 1904, p. 148: De Vinne, Theodore Low: The practice of typography; correct composition, 1910, p. 278: Sadly, none of these ...


8

As the tombstone character ∎ has been used in this capacity very regularly, I have seen these end marks referred to by that name.


7

The general approach is to try to avoid these as much as possible, but this depends on the item being designed: Brochures or flyers or generally simple designs: you can break the grid and extend text boxes here and there by a few millimeters to reflow content just enough so these can easily go away. A similar effect can be achieved by increasing the right ...


7

I grew up in the heyday of peer-to-peer file sharing, and I first heard a lot of the bands I love now through mp3s shared by friends, pen pals, and generous strangers. Wherever they came from, most of those mp3s were labeled in the “artist - song” format, and if they weren’t I changed them to match. I think a lot of people did the same. I can think of a few ...


7

There's a lot of theory about soap as well, but most people find out about washing hands in case of a global medical emergency — most people have no idea what dashes are and Youtube does not employ designers/typographers to fix names and descriptions in whatever is being uploaded — it is mass content and it is, what it is.


7

I would say overall the samples are all Minimalism, 2. Using the least amount of objects possible to convey information in an interesting manner.


7

This may be utterly unsatisfactory, but I think the right answer is, very Dutch, it mostly doesn't matter. In regular body text, the difference is so subtle that the average Dutch person will not notice. I am a native Dutch, and quite a language and typography nerd besides. I had to look real closely at your example to see what you were asking. Neither ...


6

No specific name, just different ways of flowing content into documents, all under the broader field of editorial design.


6

The proper way is to edit the paragraph style for headings and in the Span Columns tab, choose Span All. You also get options to limit the span to 2, 3 or more columns.


5

The reason they're using a space in the first image and a dash in the second has to do with how they assembled their visual hierarchy. In the first example, the designer separated the information types by changing the weight of the typeface, which is (usually) a fairly obvious indicator of a division. The second example is a bit more complicated as it ...


5

Subjective, as long as you keep it readable and consistent. I've seen (and used) different variations of these separators, it all depends on the content and the way you decide to break that up into sections, paragraphs, etc. Whitespace, color and icons are other types of separators and all these can be mixed into a design. You might want to check out these ...


5

Great thanks to everybody for your replies! I found it difficult to place all the information under icons, so I ended up with aligning the first column right and the second left, as suggested by Lucian. Made 'CLASS' the same size as features. Also listed the features in one line, separated by commas, as suggested by Billy Kerr, and made their font a bit ...


5

Constructs intended for machine-processing should generally use ASCII characters when practical. If a name is rendered using non-ASCII characters, it may get transformed to something else when a file is moved between systems, foiling efforts to e.g. take a list of files and import it into a table. Using consistent ASCII characters avoids such issues.


4

Standard usage changes with technology. Since typesetters and editors are no longer the gate keepers of published text, I am sure the ‘proper’ use of en/em dashes will change. I mean, who really cares about correct hyphenation any more? Who really knows how to hyphenate manually? A very select few.


4

Tip 1 What is the main difference between photos 1 and 2? 1 2 It is not just the size of the tomato, it is not just the number of them... is the space. Tip 2 Do not clog information. People want to see specific information, not all of it, but the relevant one. You are worried about a specific issue, characters per line, where that is not important. One ...


4

50-60 characters per line is indeed within a 'recommended' range, but that's subjective. With the right design, you should not worry about this number too much. Certainly nobody's going to count how many characters you have per line. Version 3 looks ok, but needs a bit more spacing on the margins and in between columns. Also, main header section on page 1 ...


4

It's a branch of typography called layouts. The key concept here is the use of grids which is a technique for inducing alignment, hierarchy and balance in design using whitespace. If you're interested more, please head to this website: Thinking With Type . It's based upon a classic book by Ellen Lupton. You can see similar examples of what you shared here....


4

Many designers will leave applications at their default setting - which is typically 120% of type size (at least for Adobe software). How or when to alter this is highly dependent upon many things: Actual typeface Some typefaces inherently demand more or less line spacing. 120% for some typefaces can cause ascenders/descenders to overlap. While for other ...


3

Two things you can try: Turn off hyphenation in the paragraph style. Select the '(im)possible' broken across two lines, hit CTRL+Enter and type 'No Break', then hit Enter again. What you see below is an automated Grep Style setup, with no manual selection done. Bits of text can be made to stick together whatever you do with the text box.


3

Many modern print companies today use direct to plate digital imaging technology, dispensing with the need for physical artwork/negatives in the plate making process. You might be able to find an old fashioned/low tech print company that still uses them. Open your yellow pages, find some small family run print businesses, call them and ask. You never know!


3

Is not going to be viewed from a great distance Define your viewing distance. Reading a text on a post-it, or reading the same size text from a poster does not depend on the size of the paper, it depends on the viewing distance and the size of the text. There are some other factors like the font design, but let's think that you are using a simple sans ...


3

Just my opinion- I like the way you have it set up with the loose tracking. I made just a couple tweaks- I thought there was a bit too much space in "sam" also between the A,C,and R of "acres" so I adjusted the kerning to -75 from where you had it.


3

This is already in the comments, but to answer this, I regularly and consistently use thin/hair spaces before footnote numbers, to separate these a bit. Without these thin/hair spaces added, footnotes will generally be too close to the preceding word, sometimes even sticking to it. Obviously, a full space would be too much, and should always be avoided. A ...


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