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Two things you can try: Turn off hyphenation in the paragraph style. Select the '(im)possible' broken across two lines, hit CTRL+Enter and type 'No Break', then hit Enter again. What you see below is an automated Grep Style setup, with no manual selection done. Bits of text can be made to stick together whatever you do with the text box.


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I am not providing any references but some information on how to make an informed choice yourself: One of the main purposes of typographical emphasis is to help the reader: For example, boldfacing may draw attention similar to spoken emphasis and italicising the title of a work you discuss tells the reader that its words means something different than usual....


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I can't see how orphans and widows can ever be a "good thing". They should in my opinion always be avoided, but in some cases you can be forced to accept them because the alternative is worse. Why are orphans and widows a bad thing? It always hurts my eyes to see those tiny snippets of text. It looks like an unintentional error. In this example we have ...


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The general approach is to try to avoid these as much as possible, but this depends on the item being designed: Brochures or flyers or generally simple designs: you can break the grid and extend text boxes here and there by a few millimeters to reflow content just enough so these can easily go away. A similar effect can be achieved by increasing the right ...


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I'd say this is a matter of choice and there's no written rule of this being good or bad practice. Also, it may or may not work depending on the actual typeface being used, as some fonts don't even have a true small caps set. Both books below will approach this subject in one way or another, but again they won't give a consistent answer. Robert Bringhurst: ...


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The reason they're using a space in the first image and a dash in the second has to do with how they assembled their visual hierarchy. In the first example, the designer separated the information types by changing the weight of the typeface, which is (usually) a fairly obvious indicator of a division. The second example is a bit more complicated as it ...


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Subjective, as long as you keep it readable and consistent. I've seen (and used) different variations of these separators, it all depends on the content and the way you decide to break that up into sections, paragraphs, etc. Whitespace, color and icons are other types of separators and all these can be mixed into a design. You might want to check out these ...


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