New answers tagged

2

No. Normal text flow does not apply to tables, meaning you can't have rows automatically broken across consecutive pages to show partial content. If a cell is too high to fit, it will get pushed to the next page by default. What you can do however is manually simulate this. Add another row and move some of that content there, so you can get what you need, ...


1

I would say start with the paragraph at 16px and use Fibonacci sequence to calculate the rest. It looks like the major browsers are using this logic. Along the years (for future research, using the “The Elements of Typographic Style: Version 4.0” of Robert Bringhurst, Hartley and Marks) the leading was set to 12pt for a 10pt font. Converting 12pt to pixels ...


1

Part 1 There is no need to set a different style on the last bullet point. Just set up "bullets" style with Space after set to 4mm and Space between set to 1mm, and apply this one style to all bullets. Part 2: I know of no good way to find the para before a bullet list, but you can use a trick to apply 2 styles at once. First the set up: You already ...


0

Use the Indents and Spacing section of the Paragraph Style dialog to specify Space Before and Space After. Use the option Space Between Paragraphs Using Same Style to specify the space between the bulleted list items. (note: this is a new-ish feature and may not be available in older versions in InDesign) For example, if Space Before is 1mm, Space After is ...


32

It's a feature of that particular font design. There is no distinction between a horizontal and slanted hyphen. Some fonts such as Adobe Garamond, Monotype Goudy, Goudy Old Style (URW), have a slanted hyphen, but the vast majority of serif fonts don't. Some also have a hyphen that looks more like a tilde, but again this is just a design choice. The reason ...


Top 50 recent answers are included