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I am the asker of the question, but I will get us started. The following seems to belong to the canon: Penguin Books under Jan Tschichold Jan Tschichold has been called a titan of typography and a pioneer of modern graphic design (here). As best as I can tell, every biography of him prominently features his tenure at Penguin Books. Scholarly articles and ...


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I'm unsure if you are talking about that curved lines appear thicker than straight lines or that horizontal lines appear thicker than vertical lines. This is only about the latter. I found a scientific article called A Thickness Illusion: Horizontal Is Perceived as Thicker than Vertical by de Waard, Van der Burg, and Olivers. It was january 2019 in the ...


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The optical adjustment is there to compensate for an illusion that is caused by human perception. Mostly this illusion happens in the visual processing pathway somewhere between your eye and your brain. Now its perfectly understandable that you get the answer use your eyes because thats the only simple answer. Your brain sees the illusion so you should be ...


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Most style guides simply can't account for all use cases. The decision of how and when to diverge from a style guide ultimately comes down to who is in charge and often how severe the divergence. If you are in charge, then it's your call. I find as long as I'm sticking with defined fonts and colors, then things should be okay. It's not uncommon to break ...


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I would say start with the paragraph at 16px and use Fibonacci sequence to calculate the rest. It looks like the major browsers are using this logic. Along the years (for future research, using the “The Elements of Typographic Style: Version 4.0” of Robert Bringhurst, Hartley and Marks) the leading was set to 12pt for a 10pt font. Converting 12pt to pixels ...


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