22

U+2715 (“Multiplikation X”) is in the Dingbats block. Therefore, it’s for ornamental usage (if anything) and not for communicating mathematical relations. There is no reason to expect that any font renders it in a way that would be appropriate for a mathematical operator, in particular I would expect it to be to bold and large for this purpose. Using it for ...


14

Font used for main product names (BASIL, SEA SALT) is probably Old Newspaper Types The font used for NO. 02, NO. 19 & HERB, SEASONING and the digits is probably Telegraphem Both are available at dafont.com. The closest match that I could find for those white colored texts (PURE & NATURAL, EXTRA DARK, ALL NATURAL) on black background shape/patch is ...


4

I don't know about the technical side of the "application you've written", but in some design software there are spaces of different widths, aside from the usual Space. These work even for monospaced fonts, however I believe they are not built into the actual font file, but instead somehow emulated by the software (again not aware of how it works ...


4

In English, the names of languages and countries are always capitalized. They're considered to be "proper nouns". All proper nouns are capitalized in English. It's a rule or convention in English orthography. It's just what we do. Don't try to rationalize it. This rule also applies to names, towns, cities, regions, titles, organisations, days of ...


3

You shouldn't see this as somehow manipulating the font itself, but rather as treating the characters as any other kind of vector graphics. This is actually quite easy to make if you can live with the text being expanded and no longer being editable. First of all you need to decrease the distance between the characters. Open the Character panel, select the ...


3

Futura has many forms, iterations, and knock-offs. Futura Black is a stencil version and I'd argue it does not promote quick-reading. It should be used as a display font, meaning large and short formats like titles. Quick reading implies it works well for body copy--paragraphs of text. I think the wiki article you linked to is referring to Futura in general ...


3

vſqꝫ It is a ligature between q and ꝫ U+A76B LATIN SMALL LETTER ET. The ligature itself in encoded in the private use area of the Medieval Unicode Font Initative MUFI as U+E8BF LATIN SMALL LETTER Q LIGATED WITH FINAL ET. It was encoded in the Latin Extended-D block, with many other medieval abbreviation characters from the MUFI following this proposal.


3

If your application target a community of developer, you can also use the * sign. This asterisk symbol is commonly used by programming languages to do multiplication. You can find it on wikipedia


2

I don't think there is a specific word for this. We know for sure that it is a chapter sub-head (leaving aside the fact that this book includes no chapter headers). It is also a chapter outline but its placement at the front of the chapter is purely stylistic. In fiction this seems to have been used as a tool to heighten comedy. I note that google books has ...


2

I have actually been faced with this issue a few times in my design work, and eventually ended up using the smaller × every single time. About using this on a Mac, you can probably google that, also you need to make sure this character exists in the font you are using. Some fonts have a limited character set and may not include the ×.


2

The 8 needs to be in the foreground otherwise it won't work. Or an other option is to manipulate the text frame directly.


1

Lowest common denominator.... meaning.. most often people won't use really obscure, little known, fonts. I mean, that can certainly be the case. But the best place to start looking is with more commonly used typefaces. First default app/OS fonts, then branch to more widely used typefaces... The rounded O and more oblong 0 (zero), combined with the R lead me ...


1

Since the font is curved on bottles, it's a bit hard to use online tools to identify the it. Like you said, you have already tried that. So the only other way to find it, in my opinion, is either someone already know about this font with experience or you do some 'hit and trial' to browse similar looking fonts. I did same and here's what I've found: Almost ...


1

Upload a bigger version of the image to www.myfonts.com/WhatTheFont/ It will show you similar fonts. If it is a popular font you should find the exact font. But this seems like a badly done free font so might be tricky to find again...


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