24

They are called Spurs. They're most closely associated with Western Type but they first appeared in a very different location: France! "By the end of the seventeenth century... gone are the irrelevancies of calligraphy, replaced instead by the spurs, beaks, serifs and terminals of modern typography. ...when a committee of French academics was convened ...


9

I think it is simply called an end mark: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/End_mark


7

As the tombstone character ∎ has been used in this capacity very regularly, I have seen these end marks referred to by that name.


6

This may be utterly unsatisfactory, but I think the right answer is, very Dutch, it mostly doesn't matter. In regular body text, the difference is so subtle that the average Dutch person will not notice. I am a native Dutch, and quite a language and typography nerd besides. I had to look real closely at your example to see what you were asking. Neither ...


3

Here's what I'd do. It's also quite a lot of work especially for a larger design, but avoids actually drawing the lines manually. Draw a line, duplicate it moving it approximately a 45 degree angle from the original Create a step blend for these two lines. With the Curvature Tool, modify the curves. This is probably the trickiest step and will need some ...


3

Just my opinion- I like the way you have it set up with the loose tracking. I made just a couple tweaks- I thought there was a bit too much space in "sam" also between the A,C,and R of "acres" so I adjusted the kerning to -75 from where you had it.


2

You appear to be mixing up some similar things, whose distinction matters here (and in your other question): A letter (in this context) is a unit of an orthography. For example, a is a letter of the (standard) English and Dutch orthography; ij is not a letter of the English orthography, but it is regarded as such in the Dutch orthography. A character is a ...


2

There is a method that will allow you to do something close to this, or at least have somewhat of a start to expand and then refine. It's a lot of work, for you have to make each separate hatched segment individually. First, create a symbol of your hatching pattern: Draw a very slender and wide horizontal triangle; Alt-drag it to copy it, aligning the copy'...


2

This is pretty subjective, but with this particular typeface and this particular weight, I would try a lower tracking value, or use a thicker weight. Or thicker weight and bigger tracking. Or just thicker weight. Ultimately, we can't really answer objectively without seeing that put into context, I mean let's see the entire record cover.


1

I think a better option is using brushes. This a rough 5-minute attempt that would still need refinements. Make your basic shapes by making a group of elongated triangles Convert it into a brush by dragging into your brushes panel and choosing "art brush" Now you can apply it to the inside of your shapes. It's tricky getting the angles right, and ...


1

If you have a Mac, the Font Book app will let you customize the text used in font previews. Here are two python scripts to generate a gallery of different fonts for a particular string of text. One does it via HTML and one via RTF. For either one you will need to start a list of typeface names available on your system (or ones which you want to use). For ...


1

Even Google fonts have a textbox where you can type your text. If you want to see the fonts on your computer, use a font manager. But for obvious reason, it is not feasible to have it online.


1

Trying to clarify things a bit here. If you want to "shop" for fonts online you can visit each font seller/ suppliers website. At myfonts.com you did not go deep enough to see "your text" listed in each different font category. As @Scott said, you do need to narrow the search by inputting a type style (serif, sans serif, display, etc.). ...


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