15

The main argument I always hear (I work with scientists, and they say it a lot), is that it looks better at first glance*. For a lot of people, the ragged edge looks disorderly and chaotic. On a first superficial look, having two straight margins to your text seems very neat and ordered. Also, again especially in science, there is inertia. 'This has always ...


6

Justification isn't the only way to make text readable. Line length and leading impact readability a whole lot more than justification. A reasonable paragraph length and indentation can also give you much of the effect of ragged right margins. What ragged right margins gives you is a "silhouette" to navigate by, but paragraphs with indented first ...


4

To me, in some cases fully justified text looks aesthetically better to me. That way, it fits better with adjacent stuff or paragraphs. I've tried to show it using following example:


3

In general I think you are on the right track with this layout. I will comment on your doubts and add a few extra observations. Page Numbers In my opinion, the page numbers are not too small. It's a typical beginner's mistake to make big and bold page numbers. They are an important tool, but they shouldn't attract too much attention. They could perhaps be a ...


2

Good question and I'm always puzzled myself by how many clients just need to see justified text "out of habit" or because "it looks better". I think this depends a lot on the type of content you're working with. For large text volume content (books and magazines), full justification makes more sense, as that allows for a quicker reading ...


2

Bringhurst's advice is just advice ultimately, and that may or may not work, depending on your setup, typefaces being used, etc. If it looks good with the typeface(s) you're using, I would use ᴘʜᴅ without overthinking it. European Court of Human Rights = ECHR if you look at their wiki page. Also, some fonts don't even have true small caps built-in.


2

Hyphenation, and then paper sheet economy With hyphenation, you can fit more letters per line than without it. More letters per line means less lines, and then less paper used to print the same text. You will see full justification text where there is (or, was) a history of economy scale on printing: bibles, journals, magazines... With aggressive hyphenation,...


2

Numeral one: Gill Sans MT Pro (released 2005) is "straight", and Gill Sans Nova (released 2015) is "hooked". The oldstyle numeral one is "hooked" in both, and both have a lining numeral one alternate.


2

I feel similar question has been asked before, but I couldn't find it. I'm writing an answer any way: Create a text layer and apply a thin inner Bevel like this (Uncheck global light). Choose bright and dark green colors for highlights and shadow. Let's call it Layer 1. Duplicate the layer and press Cntl + Click to make a selection of text. Contract the ...


1

Sounds like you know plenty about typography already. In all honesty this design looks quite good, page grid is ok, page numbers are ok, maybe try some in-between value for the leading (line spacing). The only bad thing about it is in the sidenotes (margins): justification works better for long lines of text (your page content), but justification gives poor ...


1

It's primarily a quantity over quality decision. Make it fit. Aesthetics aside and all other parameters being equal, fully-justified text columns results in a higher 'words per page' count than ragged-left or ragged-right text columns. This is in print media. In digital media, where the parameters are more fluid, it may still result with more words per a ...


1

There are many valuable discussion in the chat room, so I will make an answer from this. These points are very convincing to me. I edit and rearrange the points to make this answer read smoothy. The name tags don't necessarily indicate that the texts are their exact words; I just put them there to credit the real authors. Thanks everyone for spending your ...


1

You can go for Manrope as well as Inter. Both are free of cost, available under Open Font License at Google fonts.


1

The Economist seems fine with the small capitals alongside normal sized lowercase (ie, ᴘhᴅ)—see here: Economists have long sought work experience before embarking on a ᴘhᴅ, whether in consultancy, the public sector or finance. But over the past decade or so the nature of the experience has changed. A study by Kevin Bryan of the University of Toronto ...


1

One novel approach to mixed abbreviations is taken by the journal the New Criterion; to quote a recent article (emphasis added): It came as a revelation to me that there was education beyond college,” he wrote, “and it was some time before I was clear whether an ᴍ.ᴀ. was beyond a Ph.ᴅ. or vice versa. Certainly I had no plans to get either.” As you can see, ...


1

I don't know how useful I find Bringhurst's advice. Having tried it a few times, text formatted this way looks showy. It seems like his motivation is to achieve a more uniform gray value on the page by reducing the number of large capital letters, but it diverts my attention when reading, feeling like an effect for effect's sake. I think I also ran into your ...


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