25

U+2715 (“Multiplikation X”) is in the Dingbats block. Therefore, it’s for ornamental usage (if anything) and not for communicating mathematical relations. There is no reason to expect that any font renders it in a way that would be appropriate for a mathematical operator, in particular I would expect it to be to bold and large for this purpose. Using it for ...


20

I think the premise of this question is incorrect, i.e. that lower case letters with descenders/ascenders evolved to make reading easier. Our modern lower case letters evolved from Latin half-uncial scripts used by scribes (monks) after the fall of the western Roman Empire, because they were faster to write with a pen, i.e. cursive handwriting, which allowed ...


15

The main argument I always hear (I work with scientists, and they say it a lot), is that it looks better at first glance*. For a lot of people, the ragged edge looks disorderly and chaotic. On a first superficial look, having two straight margins to your text seems very neat and ordered. Also, again especially in science, there is inertia. 'This has always ...


15

Font used for main product names (BASIL, SEA SALT) is probably Old Newspaper Types The font used for NO. 02, NO. 19 & HERB, SEASONING and the digits is probably Telegraphem Both are available at dafont.com. The closest match that I could find for those white colored texts (PURE & NATURAL, EXTRA DARK, ALL NATURAL) on black background shape/patch is ...


14

Readability is always a trade-off between (untrained) pattern recognition and what readers are already used to. Any force in the direction of better readability has to overcome the friction of people having a considerable amount of training in reading existing typefaces. While (body) typefaces featuring descenders on capitals¹ might be slightly better for ...


9

In my opinion... Never Center aligning is fine for headlines, sub-headlines, captions, figures, etc. However, for paragraphs there's never a reason for line-for-line centering. Line-for-line centering creates a "wobble" - a "hula dance" of a shape - that is unstable and unbalanced. For me, full justification isn't much better but it is ...


8

You're probably looking for a "glyphic" sans-serif, one with visible stroke contrast and with swellings at the terminals. I hugely recommend Heliotrope by Matthew Butterick. It's well-spaced and proportioned for body text, and has a fair price and a common-sense license. Canela from Commercial Type is more expensive, but the main styles come free ...


7

You could call the V shape in a letter M the "vertex". On Identifont they use this terminology, and call the V shape in the M a "centre vertex". They describe it like this The upward pointing corners of the M are sometimes called an "apex", so technically, the M only has one vertex, so there's no need to call it a "centre ...


7

It looks like some stylized form of a pilcrow sign U+00B6 ¶ PILCROW SIGN or rather the earlier capitulum U+2E3F ⸿ CAPITULUM. See the Wikipedia article on Pilcrow.


7

It's non-uniformly extruded 3D text with a shadow and background plane. I'm afraid you will not find any already established single term which exactly defines it. Making it would be elementary in a proper 3D program. The shadow looks realistic, it's not the usual 2D drop shadow (=a blurred and dark 2D copy of the profile), but a cast shadow created by ray-...


7

Our current letterforms are heavily influenced by the humanist movement. This movement was heavily influenced by the roman and greek culture as their goal was to revive the society of the antiquity. Uppercase letters are derived from ancient roman writing, while lower case letters are not, they are a later addition. The uppercase characters thus follow ...


6

As mentioned in a comment, this could be achieved using Anchored Objects. I've written an answer about that here. But if your design is as simple as you show on your screenshot, it can actually be achieved only using paragraph styles in one single text frame. Edit: I've realized that this method only works in a single text frame. If the text flows to another ...


6

Justification isn't the only way to make text readable. Line length and leading impact readability a whole lot more than justification. A reasonable paragraph length and indentation can also give you much of the effect of ragged right margins. What ragged right margins gives you is a "silhouette" to navigate by, but paragraphs with indented first ...


6

The first one I would consider bad practice as it can be read as capital "i", which negatively impacts the readability. Second one isn't good either, the divider is bolder than the word indicating it is the more important element. Third one is ok(-ish) Better options could include a lighter weight, grey colour, with whitespace or written as list....


6

Writing around the world was developed using totally different systems and people have made a wide range of writing systems work just fine. Capital letters are a concept other writing systems do not have. Our upper-case formed as Roman square capitals based on Greek. The lower-case as handwriting during the dark ages. Our numerals are borrowed in from Arabic ...


5

It's not really about legibility. The text can be understood whether it's justified or not. The issue, as I see it, is about readability - how easy it is to read the text, how much effort must the viewer expend in order to ingest the copy. The overall problem with full justification is accessibility. People with cognitive disabilities, or older audiences, ...


5

In general I think you are on the right track with this layout. I will comment on your doubts and add a few extra observations. Page Numbers In my opinion, the page numbers are not too small. It's a typical beginner's mistake to make big and bold page numbers. They are an important tool, but they shouldn't attract too much attention. They could perhaps be a ...


5

Wedding invitations. Some greeting cards. Very formal, very brief pieces of text. Some poster and advertising headlines. Centered or "center justified" or "ragged-center" text is very hard to read. It immediately gives a feeling of formality or poetic embellishment. That said, many large format pieces, signs and ads use a few words ...


5

I used coreldraw and Line width modulation program to create this effect. I am just uploading Gifs for clear explanation. You can use Halftone effect as well for white effect as well. Hope you will understand.


5

It's called Small Caps In typography, small caps (short for "small capitals") are lowercase characters typeset with glyphs that resemble uppercase letters (capitals) but reduced in height and weight, close to the surrounding lowercase letters or text figures.1 This is technically not a case-transformation, but a substitution of glyphs, although ...


5

What you are describing is commonly referred to as Semi-Serif typefaces (I). Typefaces which are neither serif nor sans-serif, but somewhere in between. Like all fonts, to me some are more easily read than others. Whether or not they should be used for a "textbook" is more a matter of personal opinion than anything else - and of course, depends on ...


5

I guess it's drawn. It can originally be a blurry, but half-toned letter "a" which is zoomed to bigger size, treated like you have already done to get the bridges between the dots. The not so perfectly circular dots are changed manually to regular ones. The final pattern can be tiled in Illustrator. The used atoms seem to be these: Circles (A) and ...


5

Actual paper is both a sensory and a visual experience while a digital imitation is purely that. Paper can be as much part of the design process as the choice of type and color. It comes in both uncoated and coated including matte, gloss, cast coated, and now the very popular soft touch that gives the paper a velvety texture. The uncoated sheets can also ...


4

To me, in some cases fully justified text looks aesthetically better to me. That way, it fits better with adjacent stuff or paragraphs. I've tried to show it using following example:


4

This answer may sound like I am not answering your question, but I am. It's just probably not the answer you expect. It's the angle the nib is held at that makes the strokes thick or thin in hand writing/calligraphy with a broad nib - typically around 30° to 45°. The angle of the nib doesn't depend on whether a person is right handed or left handed. I do ...


4

In English, the names of languages and countries are always capitalized. They're considered to be "proper nouns". All proper nouns are capitalized in English. It's a rule or convention in English orthography. It's just what we do. Don't try to rationalize it. This rule also applies to names, towns, cities, regions, titles, organisations, days of ...


4

vſqꝫ It is a ligature between q and ꝫ U+A76B LATIN SMALL LETTER ET. The ligature itself in encoded in the private use area of the Medieval Unicode Font Initative MUFI as U+E8BF LATIN SMALL LETTER Q LIGATED WITH FINAL ET. It was encoded in the Latin Extended-D block, with many other medieval abbreviation characters from the MUFI following this proposal.


4

If your application target a community of developer, you can also use the * sign. This asterisk symbol is commonly used by programming languages to do multiplication. You can find it on wikipedia


4

We don't know about the technical side of the "application you've written", but in some design software there are spaces of different widths, aside from the usual Space. These work even for monospaced fonts, however I believe they are not built into the actual font file, but instead somehow emulated by the software (again not aware of how it works ...


4

The actual methods to use small caps will depend on the software you are using. Here's how to use it in Inkscape for example: Using the Type Tool, type some text, highlight it, make sure the font is Arial. Open the Text and Font dialog Shift+Ctrl+T Click on the Features tab, click on Capitals, choose "Small". Hit Apply.


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