37

This is certainly a subject with many cultural and individual differences. I have a set of rules which guides me through the days, but I often see nice typography breaking those same rules. I'll give you my thoughts about this subject, but take it for what it's worth. (The examples are just quick sketches, don't pay too much attention to the aesthetics.) ...


24

I have seen such fonts be called Stencil fonts. A quick Google search confirms this is probably what you want.


24

They are called Spurs. They're most closely associated with Western Type but they first appeared in a very different location: France! "By the end of the seventeenth century... gone are the irrelevancies of calligraphy, replaced instead by the spurs, beaks, serifs and terminals of modern typography. ...when a committee of French academics was convened ...


10

I think it is simply called an end mark: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/End_mark


9

I've found three sources mentioning this technique. Beadnell, Henry: A guide to typography, in two parts, literary and practica, 1859, p. 165-166: De Vinne, Theodore Low: The practice of typography; modern methods of book composition, 1904, p. 148: De Vinne, Theodore Low: The practice of typography; correct composition, 1910, p. 278: Sadly, none of these ...


8

Designing how a page should look is usually called layout and is not usually considered a part of typography but typography is often considered a necessary skill to do a good page layout. Page layout requires a good sense of composition. Normally one would be required to compose not just text but also graphics, photographs, background color and/or images ...


8

To expand on PieBie's accepted answer, there are a large number of stencil fonts to choose from. (My favourite, for a distinctive look, is "Marsh Stencil" If you're planning on using the font as a stencil (i.e. as a negative mask) in Vinyl, I'd suggest avoiding fonts with narrow "bridges". In stencil fonts, these are the bits that join ...


8

As the tombstone character ∎ has been used in this capacity very regularly, I have seen these end marks referred to by that name.


7

I would say overall the samples are all Minimalism, 2. Using the least amount of objects possible to convey information in an interesting manner.


7

In predecimal currency notation in the UK, the symbol should be the solidus symbol, because the word "solidus" comes from the Latin name of a coin. Pounds shillings and pence were also denoted with £, s, and d, which came from the Roman silver coinage denominations librae, solidi (plural of solidus), and denarii (plural of denarius). The solidus ...


7

This may be utterly unsatisfactory, but I think the right answer is, very Dutch, it mostly doesn't matter. In regular body text, the difference is so subtle that the average Dutch person will not notice. I am a native Dutch, and quite a language and typography nerd besides. I had to look real closely at your example to see what you were asking. Neither ...


7

You could call the V shape in a letter M the "vertex". On Identifont they use this terminology, and call the V shape in the M a "centre vertex". They describe it like this The upward pointing corners of the M are sometimes called an "apex", so technically, the M only has one vertex, so there's no need to call it a "centre ...


6

Best I can answer is it depends. It depends upon the nature of the layout. Indentation is always a good idea... In a book, then no space between paragraphs may be best. Don't reinvent the wheel. If a something is seen as "standard" breaking away from that will make your document stand out. In other forms of text documents some space between paragraphs is ...


6

No specific name, just different ways of flowing content into documents, all under the broader field of editorial design.


6

I am aware of two reasons not to use a ligature: It would optically create a connection where it is unfitting, usually over a morpheme boundary, e.g., shelfful in English or Geburtstag in German. Since the Th ligature by nature only occurs at the beginning of a morpheme (and a singular T is no morpheme in German), this does not apply. The ligature is reserved ...


6

As mentioned in a comment, this could be achieved using Anchored Objects. I've written an answer about that here. But if your design is as simple as you show on your screenshot, it can actually be achieved only using paragraph styles in one single text frame. Edit: I've realized that this method only works in a single text frame. If the text flows to another ...


4

It's a branch of typography called layouts. The key concept here is the use of grids which is a technique for inducing alignment, hierarchy and balance in design using whitespace. If you're interested more, please head to this website: Thinking With Type . It's based upon a classic book by Ellen Lupton. You can see similar examples of what you shared here....


4

This is a very basic pixel font. You could actually make one yourself or simply hand pixel the sentences you need. Searching dafont.com in the Bitmap category yields many close matches. One of them is Enter Command. The G and the D are a little bit different though. There might be a better match somewhere among the hundreds of bitmap fonts. Most of the ...


4

It is simply called Word spacing. Word spacing in typography refers to the size of the space between words. It should be distinguished from letter-spacing (the spacing between the letters within each word) and sentence spacing (the spacing between sentences). Typographers may modify the spacing of letters or words in a body of type to aid readability and ...


4

In English, compound adjectives like Anglo-Saxon, sun-bleached, blueish-green, or compound nouns such as bird-of-prey, mother-in-law, vice-president, etc., are always with a hyphen. The en dash is used to replace the word "to" in things such as Washington–Moscow hotline, London–Edinburgh train, etc. It has a different meaning from a hyphen. ...


4

It's a font named Gyrator As explained on the Mold Magazine web site: https://fontsinuse.com/typefaces/44316/gyrator Available from the Pyte Foundry: https://thepytefoundry.net/


3

I suspect this was drawn entirely by hand as it predates the era of digital design. You could do something similar using Photoshop and Illustrator together. First in Photoshop, create a slightly blurred image of some white text on a 50% grey background, make sure the layers are flattened, and that you have the foreground colour set to black and the ...


3

Your approach is definitely not wrong, especially if you have reasons to like this more spread out text flow. Most books are quite compact in their typesetting to save on paper space, but if that's not a concern with your content, go for it. There's also plenty of 'experimental' typography where you can pretty much do whatever you want as long as it makes ...


3

It's drawn. It is not a "font". It's art. None of the lines are straight.


3

Set the text color to [None]. Text "with color" will always appear in a PDF, even if there are objects covering it or you select 'white' as its color. The thick underline is a simple rectangle, but as you correctly (and wisely!) double-checked, that actual text still gets rendered first. However: the PDF rendering model does not have an equivalent ...


3

It's a drop shadow but made in a different way for the bulged appearance. Have a text layer. Select the text by Ctrl+Clicking the text object icon in the layers panel. Smooth the selection for ex with Refine edge or like here, apply Select > Modify > Smooth Make a new bottom layer and fill the selection there with black or other color. Move the layer ...


3

I think this could be achieved just by combining two Layer Styles: a stroke effect with a drop shadow effect. You may have to play around with the thickness of the stroke, and angle of the drop shadow to get it to look right. I think it's better to do something like this with layer styles because it's non-destructive, and you can edit the text Anyway here's ...


3

Here's what I'd do. It's also quite a lot of work especially for a larger design, but avoids actually drawing the lines manually. Draw a line, duplicate it moving it approximately a 45 degree angle from the original Create a step blend for these two lines. With the Curvature Tool, modify the curves. This is probably the trickiest step and will need some ...


3

Just my opinion- I like the way you have it set up with the loose tracking. I made just a couple tweaks- I thought there was a bit too much space in "sam" also between the A,C,and R of "acres" so I adjusted the kerning to -75 from where you had it.


3

You appear to be mixing up some similar things, whose distinction matters here (and in your other question): A letter (in this context) is a unit of an orthography. For example, a is a letter of the (standard) English and Dutch orthography; ij is not a letter of the English orthography, but it is regarded as such in the Dutch orthography. A character is a ...


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