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5

I guess it's drawn. It can originally be a blurry, but half-toned letter "a" which is zoomed to bigger size, treated like you have already done to get the bridges between the dots. The not so perfectly circular dots are changed manually to regular ones. The final pattern can be tiled in Illustrator. The used atoms seem to be these: Circles (A) and ...


0

if the characters overlap, make that part of the brand. I personally wouldn't do it, but if you make it intentional and write it into the Brand Guide, why not make it a thing. If you do make the characters overlap, you would have to decide which character takes precedence / goes over the other. Would the dark green go over the white, or vice versa. ...


3

No, you do not need to use the same tracking for both the numbers and the letters. You are in charge of making things look "right" and be usable. There are no really hard rules. Consistency is a good goal, but these pieces are distinct and if using different tracking serves your end goal (making things look "good" and usable) then do it. ...


0

If it happens that you want to include the edited letter outlines to text you have at least one easy possibility. You can paste them into text as inline graphics. That can happen at least in Adobe Indesign. Inline graphics for Illustrator has hanged in the feature wishlist. Another more complex possibility is to create a new font in a font editor. If the ...


4

the short answer is no. you would need a script to read the shapes as OCR content and the convert it back into a string of text. usually when such documents are made a duplicate layer containing editable text is kept in the file (you can also turn off that particular layer's capability to print as further security)


0

Great choice! You just put it up on Github and say it's released under the OFL. (I'm not an expert but get the impression OFL is better than Apache for fonts.)


7

You're probably looking for a "glyphic" sans-serif, one with visible stroke contrast and with swellings at the terminals. I hugely recommend Heliotrope by Matthew Butterick. It's well-spaced and proportioned for body text, and has a fair price and a common-sense license. Canela from Commercial Type is more expensive, but the main styles come free ...


4

What you are describing is commonly referred to as Semi-Serif typefaces (I). Typefaces which are neither serif nor sans-serif, but somewhere in between. Like all fonts, to me some are more easily read than others. Whether or not they should be used for a "textbook" is more a matter of personal opinion than anything else - and of course, depends on ...


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