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14

Make a path with a Zig Zag effect Extrude this path. Apply a Perspective number to make a distortion: Make a Symbol with the text and edit the Extrude & Bevel Options from the Appearance Panel to apply it as a Map Art Click the Map Art button Choose the face surface at the top right options Select the the text symbol Scale it and rotate it if ...


0

Here is a way to scale the Leading proportionally with the Font Size using "Auto Leading*: Select your text frame or paragraph. Enter Justification in the "sandwich menu" in the Paragraph panel (or in your Paragraph Style settings). In the Auto Leading field write: 100 * Leading / Font Size (in your case 100*20.8/12). Set the leading to Auto. Now you can ...


0

A hands-on way of doing this is simply to multiply the Font Size and the Leading with the same number:


1

Set the leading in percentage Calculate the leading in percentage: 12 pt / 20.8 = 12 pt / 145% Select the text and set the leading to auto Increase the font size Change the leading to 145%


0

Grab a corner of the text box while holding CTRL and drag. This scales the text box up or down proportionally, meaning, font size and leading will be both adjusted proportionally. Then re-adjust the text box to its original size by dragging the side handles, if needed.


4

I don't think there are formulas, but some perception theory can help. Placing some basic shapes on a baseline, this is interpreted as a horizon where the shapes are supported: The ones that offer the greatest firmness are those which have two support axes perpendicular to the baseline: square or rectangle. These support axes generate some structural lines....


2

Most style guides simply can't account for all use cases. The decision of how and when to diverge from a style guide ultimately comes down to who is in charge and often how severe the divergence. If you are in charge, then it's your call. I find as long as I'm sticking with defined fonts and colors, then things should be okay. It's not uncommon to break ...


12

Make a text box with the content Rotate it -15º Deselect Use the Direct Selection Tool and click the text box edge holding Alt to select just the frame shape Shear it -15º


0

No to your first question since 19.2/16=1.2, but the Golden Ratio φ is 1.618033988749895... No, and yes (kind of) to your second question. There is no Web Typography Consortium nor are there "regulations" governing typography. However, there is the W3C, but they aren't a regulatory body. They have created a set of international standards/guidelines that ...


1

I would say start with the paragraph at 16px and use Fibonacci sequence to calculate the rest. It looks like the major browsers are using this logic. Along the years (for future research, using the “The Elements of Typographic Style: Version 4.0” of Robert Bringhurst, Hartley and Marks) the leading was set to 12pt for a 10pt font. Converting 12pt to pixels ...


2

I am the asker of the question, but I will get us started. The following seems to belong to the canon: Penguin Books under Jan Tschichold Jan Tschichold has been called a titan of typography and a pioneer of modern graphic design (here). As best as I can tell, every biography of him prominently features his tenure at Penguin Books. Scholarly articles and ...


-1

Kane Display Stencil looks close


0

There is a tool in FontForge named Expand Stroke. It allows customizing the amount of emboldening both horizontally and vertically, as well as the angle. First of all, the "Pen Type": I recommend "Circular (Elliptical)" for auto-emboldening. It provides the most even distribution of emboldening at all angles. Then, the "Main Stroke Width" and "Main Stroke ...


0

Some background The visible bearing at the start of the line is a side-effect of how digital typography works. In traditional typesetting, lining up the left edge of a typeface was standard practice because, as you've discovered, misaligned left edges can look bad under certain circumstances. When digital desktop publishing became the norm, this tidy visual ...


1

Handwriting-likeness cannot be made by randomly moving the nodes of the glyph paths. A little child who tries to make slowly a freehand copy of the outline of a glyph can produce something which can be simulated by randomly moving the nodes of a path and very likely by increasing the number of the nodes. Established handwriting should look consistent which ...


3

Assuming you convert these glyphs to outlines, it could be done in vector image editing software such as Adobe Illustrator or Inkscape (which is free). In Inkscape, select the outlines and do Extensions > Modify Path > Jitter Nodes. Select the option to "Shift node handles", and adjust the displacement values as required. In Illustrator a similar effect is ...


1

I would like to show my version. The result is almost like the image sample (I think). Using Photoshop CC. 1- Duplicate the text several times. Leave a master copy on top of the layer stack. 2- Select the copy layers and make a Smart Object. Change the Smart Layer to Darker Mode. 3- Filter > Blur > Motion Blur. Angle 0, distance 8. 4- Filter > Sharpen > ...


32

It's a feature of that particular font design. There is no distinction between a horizontal and slanted hyphen. Some fonts such as Adobe Garamond, Monotype Goudy, Goudy Old Style (URW), have a slanted hyphen, but the vast majority of serif fonts don't. Some also have a hyphen that looks more like a tilde, but again this is just a design choice. The reason ...


0

As explained in the posts you linked, “the point of indenting the first line of paragraphs is to help the reader distinguish adjacent paragraphs when reading or skimming the text.” So when you have an element (like a list) that clearly separates the paragraphs already, an indentation could easily become unnecessary or even a bad choice. But it would depend ...


0

I'd be surprised if there were a name for this type of abbreviation. In British English, abbreviations have a full-stop after them. E.g. "Esq." for "Esquire". Contractions are less standardised. Modern practice in British English is usually to simply omit the full-stop. E.g. "Mr" for "Mister" (this distinction is rarely made in US English). Where the ...


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