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-1

Its Done BY Calligraphic Brushe tool and some stroke width!


2

It's drawn. It is not a "font". It's art. None of the lines are straight.


0

Photoshop wouldn't be my first choice to create something like this. It would be much easier using vector software such as Adobe Illustrator or Inkscape (which is free). Enable the grid and snap to grid Create a rectangle, type text in it, centre align the text horizontally and vertically within the box Group the box and text. Duplicate the group, and use ...


0

The former is the Monotype variant of Impact. You probably have a slightly different variant on your Computer already. Notice for example the top right curve of the Monotype Impact B, which appears slightly rounder than the Adobe one above. The kerning also appears to have been adjusted. An interesting tidbit, Monotype did originally buy the rights to ...


2

What are you looking for is "grid based layout design" - This kind of focus on graphics is mainly appreciated in the editorial world (look for "Editorial Graphic Design" ) - so related to publications/printing for obvious reasons. In Italy I also have heard it being called Swiss style even though "minimalism"- as I see it being called here- is very well ...


2

If you are able to go to your public library they should have books on layout and design. You can probably search their catalog online. If you are interested in print, as opposed to web based, layout you are looking for books in the vicinity of 686.2. Hint: Searching the catalog will probably bring up mostly web based design books. Search for "typography ...


4

This is a very basic pixel font. You could actually make one yourself or simply hand pixel the sentences you need. Searching dafont.com in the Bitmap category yields many close matches. One of them is Enter Command. The G and the D are a little bit different though. There might be a better match somewhere among the hundreds of bitmap fonts. Most of the ...


4

It's a branch of typography called layouts. The key concept here is the use of grids which is a technique for inducing alignment, hierarchy and balance in design using whitespace. If you're interested more, please head to this website: Thinking With Type . It's based upon a classic book by Ellen Lupton. You can see similar examples of what you shared here....


8

Designing how a page should look is usually called layout and is not usually considered a part of typography but typography is often considered a necessary skill to do a good page layout. Page layout requires a good sense of composition. Normally one would be required to compose not just text but also graphics, photographs, background color and/or images ...


7

I would say overall the samples are all Minimalism, 2. Using the least amount of objects possible to convey information in an interesting manner.


6

No specific name, just different ways of flowing content into documents, all under the broader field of editorial design.


1

Inconsolata now has plenty of different widths apart from regular width: SemiCondensed, Condensed, ExtraCondensed, UltraCondensed SemiExpanded, Expanded, ExtraExpanded, UltraExpanded


0

tl;dr Ask your writers. There are long-standing answers to your question about paragraph breaks that vary between disciplines. You don't have to reinvent this, neither should you try. For what it's worth, there are numerous style guides developed over centuries of bookmaking that specify how to handle paragraph breaks. Fiction, often printed on cheap ...


2

My personal opinion, is that this does not appear "amateurish" to me. However, I think it may be a bit child-like for more professional educational services. I would expect education geared towards a younger demographic if I saw that logo. The last thing on my mind would be more adult, or professional-level, courses. In fact, I'd see the logo and ...


36

This is certainly a subject with many cultural and individual differences. I have a set of rules which guides me through the days, but I often see nice typography breaking those same rules. I'll give you my thoughts about this subject, but take it for what it's worth. (The examples are just quick sketches, don't pay too much attention to the aesthetics.) ...


3

Your approach is definitely not wrong, especially if you have reasons to like this more spread out text flow. Most books are quite compact in their typesetting to save on paper space, but if that's not a concern with your content, go for it. There's also plenty of 'experimental' typography where you can pretty much do whatever you want as long as it makes ...


6

Best I can answer is it depends. It depends upon the nature of the layout. Indentation is always a good idea... In a book, then no space between paragraphs may be best. Don't reinvent the wheel. If a something is seen as "standard" breaking away from that will make your document stand out. In other forms of text documents some space between paragraphs is ...


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