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0

Do discretionary line breaks work in current version at all? See https://indesign.uservoice.com/forums/601180-adobe-indesign-bugs/suggestions/32882734-discretionary-line-break-doesn-t-work-in-cc-2018


4

A reverse image search brings up the design archive this came from, as well as some details. It's CS Beta Bold https://www.experimentaljetset.nl/archive/comingsoon Judging from the details provided by the archive, you likely won't be able to obtain a license for this family.


0

I suggest NK57 Monospace Condensed Extrabold


8

You can create stuff like this in Illustrator using a blend The example below is just a very quick example. I'm sure with some time and care you could create something much better. It's constructed from some sheared text, which has been rotated, and converted to outlines. I then stacked 3 copies and filled them with different colours - black on the ...


1

Most parts of letters are named, and there are some terms which only apply to a single letter. For example the spine of the S. Here is a good article to read. https://visme.co/blog/type-anatomy/


2

I am not providing any references but some information on how to make an informed choice yourself: One of the main purposes of typographical emphasis is to help the reader: For example, boldfacing may draw attention similar to spoken emphasis and italicising the title of a work you discuss tells the reader that its words means something different than usual....


3

I think it may be this one. Either 'Silk-serif Semi-Bold' https://www.myfonts.com/fonts/silktype/silk-serif/semi-bold/ or 'Silk-serif Medium' https://www.myfonts.com/fonts/silktype/silk-serif/medium/ It looks more like the Semi Bold.


1

I'd say this is a matter of choice and there's no written rule of this being good or bad practice. Also, it may or may not work depending on the actual typeface being used, as some fonts don't even have a true small caps set. Both books below will approach this subject in one way or another, but again they won't give a consistent answer. Robert Bringhurst: ...


-1

I don't think there's a name for these "components", just like there's no name for the dot in the letter i, for example. They're just part of the glyph.


1

Although it's slightly off, some of this is a little like futurism of the 1990s and 2000s, the techno aesthetic. The Y2K Aesthetic feed is great for inspiration for fonts and color schemes of that time.


4

Personal opinion.... I dislike the thinner font weight. The more open counters are nice, but the thinner stroke weights are contrary to the mark. Kerning is better in the thin type, especially surrounding the "o" and "g". But I'd still prefer a thicker face if it were my brand. In addition, the left angle of the mark's "A" has a "bump" in it. It's not ...


3

20 years! This is a very personal opinion which you are free to consider or not :) After using these ultra classic font families myself for a long time, I'm now moving away from these and trying out the new wave of font design. There's alot of crazy fonts out there and these could potentially work for a multimedia business. Also, moving from black to blue ...


5

The reason they're using a space in the first image and a dash in the second has to do with how they assembled their visual hierarchy. In the first example, the designer separated the information types by changing the weight of the typeface, which is (usually) a fairly obvious indicator of a division. The second example is a bit more complicated as it ...


5

Subjective, as long as you keep it readable and consistent. I've seen (and used) different variations of these separators, it all depends on the content and the way you decide to break that up into sections, paragraphs, etc. Whitespace, color and icons are other types of separators and all these can be mixed into a design. You might want to check out these ...


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