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17

I don't think there are any fonts that you can reasonably expect to find on every system. Why not just include your own font defining these three glyphs? Or just use the one below. It only took a few minutes to draw in FontForge. @font-face { font-family: UniCircles; src: url(data:application/font-woff2;base64,...


11

Unicode Characters are chosen by those that are submitted to the Unicode Technical Committee. Usually the submissions are characters that are already being used. Most of the cat characters that exist now were emoji characters, used by many japanese phone carriers before being included in unicode. These emoji are very focused on japanese culture, including ...


8

The rendering of UTF emojis is platform / vendor specific. There is no CSS or other tricks involved. Different vendors (Apple, Google, Microsoft, Mozilla, Samsung etc.) simply chose to provide different icons for these UTF characters. In Chrome on a Mac, for example, the two alien characters you linked to do not appear in green. This is what they look like: ...


8

This answer is copied from Black and white emoji fonts – enfascination Noto Emoji Font Google has a fully internationalized font, Noto, whose emoji font has a black and white version: https://github.com/googlei18n/noto-emoji/tree/master/fonts The smiley’s are blobs. EmojiOne EmojiOne is a color font with black and white fallbacks. I couldn’t figure out how ...


7

myfonts.com does indeed provide one solution. In the advanced search form, select “available characters” from the field to search, “contains,” and type your character in the search box. Be sure to check the results by looking at the table of glyphs in each font, because I haven’t found the results absolutely reliable, but they do give you a start. Where is ...


7

In predecimal currency notation in the UK, the symbol should be the solidus symbol, because the word "solidus" comes from the Latin name of a coin. Pounds shillings and pence were also denoted with £, s, and d, which came from the Roman silver coinage denominations librae, solidi (plural of solidus), and denarii (plural of denarius). The solidus ...


6

All versions of Windows come with the Character Map utility with which you can browse the available glyphs of any installed font. Enabling Advanced View will allow you to filter your results by Character Set or Group; a search function is available as well. This is hardly what I would consider "programatically", but you'll still be able to search for a glyph ...


5

These glyphs are part of Adobe Wood Type Ornaments You can read more about these glyphs here. I don't think they have a unicode value, but you can access them via the Character Viewer in OSX or the Glyphs panel in Adobe software.


5

What about something like this ▧? I can't seem to make it larger so here's a pic Unicode number: U+2668 / HTML-code: ▧


4

I'd say the name is 'Approval curl' and there is no unicode. In The Netherlands the naming differs, so there should be differnt English words too if English speakers would use the symbol I guess. But if I had to choose, ´approval curl´ would be my choice. The appearance of the sign also differs too. See here a printscreen of two slighlty different 'krullen'...


4

It all depends on the font. Take the font Zapfino, for instance. It has multiple glyphs for the same unicode characters, some of which are very curly and tall.


4

vſqꝫ It is a ligature between q and ꝫ U+A76B LATIN SMALL LETTER ET. The ligature itself in encoded in the private use area of the Medieval Unicode Font Initative MUFI as U+E8BF LATIN SMALL LETTER Q LIGATED WITH FINAL ET. It was encoded in the Latin Extended-D block, with many other medieval abbreviation characters from the MUFI following this proposal.


3

Go to MyFonts and click on Advanced Search, then make a search with what you want to see, most likely this one: Available Characters V Contains V "your SAMPLE TEXT ♩♫♬♭♮♯♪ TEXT" Then MyFonts will nicely list you all capable typefaces with the musical characters right next to some sample text of your own choice. And you can pick according to the rendering ...


3

It's pretty subjective once you get into different widths of spaces down to such minute details. I don't believe you'll find a specific usage because one does not exist. The main difference among other space characters is their width. U+2000..U+2006 are standard quad widths used in typography. U+2007 FIGURE SPACE has a fixed width, known as tabular width, ...


3

The Nordic Mark Sign is U+20BB. The example is shown here: https://unicode-table.com/en/20BB/ Your example looks like a different design, perhaps depending on the font?? Or perhaps the Danish version was different? There are some fonts which have a glyph - but again these look like different designs. See those shown here: http://www.fontspace.com/unicode/...


3

Universal symbols for positive (i.e., good): + (plus sign), ^ (up arrow) Universal symbols for negative (not good): - (minus sign), down arrow Also, filled and unfilled circles, along with color variation, can indicate opposite values. Consumer reports has used filled, unfilled, and half-filled circles for years in their ratings tables. See below: ]1


3

This character has strong similarities to deleatur, which is used in proofreading, however to mark that something shall be deleted:


3

You could install FontForge - it's a free and open source font editor and will show you what glyphs the font has - it has various ways of laying out the code points in order. Note that coverage isn't as easy as looking at which blocks are fully covered. For example, it's very common for a font to contain basically all of Latin-1 plus a small handful of ...


3

Combining characters and positioning OpenType fonts have a Glyph Positioning table (GPOS) which is used to provide precise control over glyph placement for sophisticated text layout and rendering in different scripts. The GPOS table can position glyphs in a number of ways. From the Microsoft OpenType Specification: The GPOS table supports eight types of ...


3

While there are some nice answers using CSS and a lot of HTML, the easiest solution is to use a font that actually has the music symbols, assuming you can include the font. Most monospaced fonts that I've tested don't have the music symbols. To make up for it your OS substitutes a character from another font (not sure if macs handle this better but on ...


3

Going with Cai’s idea of using a tabular structure to represent this, it occurred to me that the contents of the table could be vastly simplified by relegating the purely visual aspects (i.e., the graphical representation of the frets themselves) to table properties: borders, spacing, etc. (I think this is essentially what Chris’ comment to the question ...


3

It boils down to: you need (to find) a monospaced font that contains musical symbols and load this as a webfont into your document. If such a font does not exist (or you do not want to pay for it)... ...make one yourself: Find a nice, free, open monospace font (may I recommend Hack ? ) Add the musical symbols that lack (try wikimedia) and export it again ...


3

I believe the question is asking why A, 𝐀, 𝒜 and 𝓐 have different code points when they are the same character in different fonts. The answer is that they are not the letter A in different fonts. They are different characters in a single font (assuming the font includes them and they can be displayed: if not, then a substitution might occur). It is a more ...


2

You could just use a table with a cell for each glyph. So, this is how it renders with your current markup: This is how it looks with each glyph in its own cell: The markup for that is: <table align="left" border="0" cellpadding="0"> <caption align="top"><b><i>Example: 7<sup>&#9839;9</sup></i></b></...


2

I managed to create a FontForge font that exhibits the same error message. However, I had to manipulate the file manually (i.e., with a text editor), as FontForge didn’t allow me to make this mistake. Therefore it is not extremely unlikely that whatever caused this error for you also caused other problems. This error indicates that you assigned two glyphs ...


2

I honestly have no idea what's going on here. I can't get them to combine correctly from direct input at all but I could get them to combine correctly by pasting an ogonek directly before the dotless i... then two minutes later I try again and it doesn't work. It's not ideal but as a workaround you can simply kern both glyphs to the correct position. Again, ...


2

If it can help, here's the whole list of unicodes with a nice big preview: http://unicode-table.com/en/. Also, it could be helpful to know what unicodes you have used so far for the other tools! Some suggestions for the "bucket" and "fill" feature: ⩂ Unicode number: U+2A42 / HTML-code: &#10818; ⩌ Unicode number: U+2A4C / HTML-code: &#...


2

I needed the same characters (for Sierra Leonean Krio and Themne, in fact!). Here is what I ended up with after a fair bit of research. Noto https://www.google.com/get/noto/ Gentium plus https://software.sil.org/gentium/ Junicode https://junicode.sourceforge.io/ It's frustrating that some fonts include the characters I need but just appear to use a duplicate ...


2

Noto Sans aims to cover all of Unicode Characters. Not there yet, but seems to have both that you're looking for.


2

The character doesn't (as far as I can see) exist in Unicode, it may very well exist as a character in a font though, so check through the small caps in your font first... Small caps are usually implemented as OpenType features, so whether they have Unicode code points is mostly irrelevant (there are some Unicode small caps, but not a complete set). ...


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