8

Because they are not followers of trends. They are trend setters. Whole thing about Apple is "think different". You got 20 e-mails with "see what's IN in design in 201X" and it's something that Big Companies will never do. They need/want to stand out of the crowd not to blend in. It's exactly because such design speak to the mass. And Facebook/Apple/Twitter ...


5

This is called a SlidingUpPanel - given that one has this sort of interaction behavior with the element in mind: https://pub.dev/packages/sliding_up_panel Searching for SlidingUpPanel as UI element delivers the best search results as well as the most ready to use components out of various frameworks.


5

Not sure what qualifies as a 'large company' and exactly what you expect to see in a 'flat design', but some of the latest Android interfaces do look pretty flat to me. Also, Facebook's app interface does have flat elements and the iPhone looks much more flat than it did a few years back. I assume Microsoft is also large by any standards and also looks ...


4

As for Wheat / Gluten labels unless you specifically want to convey that the product contains these, you should cross them out to signify wheat-free or gluten-free products. Not sure what your full assignment for this is but it is very hard to differentiate between these two pictorially and for people with Celiac disease this difference is a big deal. I ...


3

Well I'm sure this is not as 'creative' as your management probably expects you to go into Einstein-mode and invent what nobody else did, but.. moving away from floppies and drives and all that explicit symbolism, you can just type the name of the action and use a good old checkmark. You're done working, so you 'Save and Close', right?


2

An important point to consider is the context of the design, is it for a one proposition app or website, or a complex online tool. Vibrant strong colours can look great, however by using bright colours you need to be careful you are still able to create a visual hierarchy to distinguish between primary secondary and tertiary goals/ functions. An example ...


2

Not every concept can easily be drawn into an icon. Material things, meaning actual physical objects can easily be associated with a symbol (laptop, car, dog, hat), but more abstract notions don't always have a direct symbol that everybody will recognize. Particularly hard when you're pairing similar concepts with subtle differences between them (vegan vs. ...


2

Those are simply called "cards" in every environment that I've seen them in. You could add other descriptors in this case, such as "flat", "rounded", and "low contrast" (the text in the images you show would likely fail an accessibility audit). But they are just cards. Searching for "checkout card" or something similar can get you more examples.


1

Determining a "base" or "target" screen size depends on several factors. If you have an existing product, a good process would be looking at analytics to understand what type of device is most common for your users. If you're designing and developing a new product, you can make a guess depending on what demographics you think your product will be used by. If ...


1

There is a language that is a little complex to learn. Chinese. The point is that it has ideograms instead of phonetic symbols. Trying to put icons for everything is a bit complex. It is easier for people to read a text than to learn new symbols and styles. Even making icons for an application, like software, making icons for every command is complex. It ...


1

This question is probably better suited for https://ux.stackexchange.com/ But in my opinion, you need to differentiate two things. The area and mode of interaction. The way the element behaves. You could have your icon, and when clicked the menu simply slides from the right instead of unfolding from the top. But for the sliding thing, it can be tricky. ...


1

Touching the hamburger menu is standard... regardless of how the menu appears. It doesn't matter if the menu appears as a pop up, sudden dropdown, or slides in from a side/top/bottom.. a simple touch of the hamburger should perform the "show" action. Requiring the user to slide left is unintuitive and you will cause usability hurdles. However, if you ...


1

AFAIK no; you can share only the current version of the file and there isn't a way to import CSV data (although there is a feature request in their forum). However you can make these customizable elements as Components and add them to a Team Library duplicate your project file for each client customize the component in the project file (you can change text,...


1

Clearly, there are few details available about this proposed app interface whose wireframes you link to, and so what responses you get will be somewhere in the intersection space between sheer speculation and SWAGs - including this one. Nonetheless I will hazard a moment of extrapolation. Points to consider: 1. Amazon has huge resources, both in terms of ...


1

You do not want especially little. Software which can dress some clothes onto a human-like 3D shape exists, but it costs a fortune. The price is formed as well as by the sheer complexity of the task as the value which a pro user can get when he checks and presents his cloth creations. Here's one for cloth designers: https://optitex.com This is another: https:...


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