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6

Whenever possible I prefer to work in a non-destructive manner to make future editing much easier. To this end I, personally, would not use Pathfinder here. I'd use a Clipping Mask on the blade. Copy the blade shapes paste the copy on top of everything Draw a new shape which covers the areas of the blade you want to show on top of the snake. Make certain it'...


4

This is InDesign CS6. So, it's feasible there's a difference in newer CC versions... inDesign effects applied to placed graphics If the effect, such as drop shadow, is applied in InDesign to a placed graphic, it is possible to adjust the graphic opacity separate from the effect opacity. Merely use the Direct Selection Tool (White arrow) to select the ...


3

You can't. Round cornered fonts are designed like that. That said, you can convert the text into curves and adjust the corners of the characters, but the text is no longer editable. Unless you convert that back into a font file. You can also just apply Effect > Stylize > Round Corners but then all the corners will be rounded (if you check your examples you'...


3

Add a fill to the character via the Appearance Panel Set the fill to be a gradient of your two color Rotate the gradient 90° so its horizontal Select each color stop of the gradient and set the Location to 50%. Add the stroke as desired Note you don't have to use 50% for the gradient stop location, but both stops need to be in the same location. If you want ...


3

Go to Window -> Stroke Modify the Cap, Corners, Limit, etc (ie, try a higher or lower number in Limit) Additionally, make sure your shape is "closed" by completing the path just in case. EDIT: Up your Limit to 30 or so. Limit of 0: Limit of 30:


3

A very simple method would be to draw some pieces of the sword to cover over part of the snake, and fill them the same colour as the sword. Here's a very quick example


2

You want Edit / Preferences / Behaviour and you can set a number there. The lower the number, the less change when you try to simplify.


2

It appears as though the clipping mask didn't act quite as precisely as you would have hoped. Having the colors behind the gray stroke line up so closely to the edge is never a good idea, in my opinion - leaving a little breathing room between the edges would be better. My suggestion would be to simply scale up the size of the gray outline. With the gray ...


2

Not sure if there's a plugin for Illustrator to automate it, however it can be done manually. It's a little repetitive, but doable. Create a grid of equilateral triangles with a thin stroke and no fill, select all, and turn them into a Live Paint object. Blur a colourful raster image in Photoshop using the Gaussian blur filter. Place the raster image in ...


2

Go into outline mode via CTRL+Y. Hit A for Direct Selection Tool. Click that line in the middle and hit DEL. Repeat if you can still see it, as you probably have that line 2 times, from both shapes. Second time you do this, it should probably go away. Exit outline mode via CTRL+Y.


2

Try Inkscape. It has in its Path menu effect "Dynamic Offset". You drag one handle which moves the edge outwards or inwards. Apply that effect to a duplicate of your closed path. Limitation: You have no control how much sharp corners will be rounded. Many fonts like your A will be virtually destroyed, it's not the same font any more. Better result is ...


1

With Gimp: Method #1: Select>From path Select>Shrink Select>To path Method #2: Create new transparent layer, and Edit>Stroke path (line mode, twice the offset that you need) Layer>Transparency>Alpha to selection Select>To path Delete the outer stroke Comparison: black: initial path blue: method #1 red: method #2 Results are similar, method #2 is ...


1

The green line vanishes as soon as nothing is selected. I guess your problem is the unwanted horizontal white border between yellow and red. Solve the case by building your shapes differently: You need a base color version (=yellow) with no stroke, an extra color piece with no stroke and a stroke-only version. In the right you see how they are stacked. In ...


1

Take any image, blurred images work best. Open it in Photoshop Optional make image width height*sqrt(3)/2. Makes it easier to understand how the mosaicing works. (we will fix this anyway) decide how many tiles you want in height/width. say 20 by 20. Use Image → canvas size to make the image size of one tile smaller horizontally and half size of one ...


1

If you want to output a PDF and automatically have the text turned to outlines, you can make yourself a new PDF Preset. Go to Edit > Adobe PDF Presets...> then make a new preset, choose an initial format such as X-1a:2001 then under Advanced tab, pick "Custom..." for transparency, and you can select to "convert all text to outlines" Set any other ...


1

I finally resolved this. Using the information from comments and @joojaa answer, I concluded that PDF is not an option. I focussed on SVG, and I was able to achieve the result using the embedded CSS block with stroke-width property. However, this is not enough to achieve the wanted behavior in the browser. The key is to set the stroke width in viewport ...


1

PDF specification has no such capability. PDF is a print preparation/archival/wysiwyg format. Its simply not meant for this usecase. Like others have said svg files in a browser have this property. But thats not a universal works in all svg rendererers kind of thing. Browsers are especially flexible, so you could even make it thinner when you zoom in if you ...


1

As you probably expected, no such feature in Indesign. However, you can simulate the effect by: applying a huge [paper] inner glow. Normal mode, 100%. This will turn your artwork into white applying your drop shadow. Make sure the option 'Object Knocks Out Shadow' is unticked. setting object transparency to multiply. Now let the magic happen: NB: Don'...


1

You can use Edit -> Edit Colors -> Recolor Artwork. You can see all colors here and you can edit / replace them.


1

It is a good idea to expand any strokes prior to doing this. This "bakes-in" the art and flattens it. So, this is a production step to be used to prepare the artwork for reproduction. It will make production easier/correct, but will also make any further aesthetic editing, with respect to placement or size of objects, much more difficult. A 2 file workflow ...


1

Getting a good effect is non-trivial, I'm afraid. You can read this article, (page 16) but basically, if you put round ends on the end of the letters they look bigger (as you've added something), if you replace stroke endings with round ends the letters look smaller (you've removed something). Both those effects noticeably change the way the letters look. ...


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