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40

There is no 3D modeler at work in your examples. If you look at your sample images, all the highlights are the same, and you can pick out coins which are identical. This is a clear indicator that there's no actual 3D taking place. Coins are drawn in a 2D application with perspective, then duplicated and altered slightly. A quick rough example.... You may ...


36

The hole in a real VW is a common sheet metal trick named "Rounded Louver". Realistic drawing of a louver needs complex shading. It's easiest if you can accept it as bent inwards, without shiny glosses and without a chrome edge list. Here are three of them on a flat surface: One louver is made by interpolating between a black line and blue edge ...


17

I think it depends on the art style you want to go for. If you're doing a flat design style like in your first image, then you can replicate the vents by using 2 rounded-rectangles that overlap. If you're going with the other images, then it would be a similar process. Draw the shapes and use gradients.


13

Instead of creating multiple pipe segments you could use a clipping mask on your snake pipe: Just create a shape (or a compound shape, it doesn't matter) that covers the area you want to stay visible, then select it together with your snake shape, Object > Clipping Mask > Make. I'd use rectangles for the clipping mask, it's quick/easy enough to create and ...


11

The way to have this re-sizeable without pixelation (jagged edges) is to Re-draw this in a vector application and save it as a .pdf (or any vector format) Photoshop is a raster (pixel based) application and will show pixelation when resized.


10

You need to have the Show Transform Handles option selected in the tool controls along the top Then use the Edit Paths by Nodes tool F2 to select the two nodes by clicking and dragging a selection around them Hold down Shift as you click and drag the transform handles.


8

The clipping is the minor part of the whole problem. The major part is to get the right shading. Your gradient approach isn't plausible. Illustrator's 3D cannot make it because 3D helix is unknown for Illustrator. Of course it's possible is to crib or export the right shading from a real 3D program. Only seeing it somewhere and then making a copy from ...


7

Contrary to popular belief, blends can contain more 'key' objects than just a start and an end. Adding new objects to an existing blend might allow you to achieve the effect you are looking for: Make a blend as you are used to. For the example, I used a red and a yellow circle and specified 3 steps. Double-click the blend with the Move tool to enter its ...


6

Technically speaking you've already done what you set out to do, with blender. But as Scott pointed out the examples you've provided have been drawn from the start in 2D to include a third dimension, and are not actually 3D. Regarding the "realism", I'd like to point out two things in your examples that stand out to me when compared to your image: The ...


6

Whenever possible I prefer to work in a non-destructive manner to make future editing much easier. To this end I, personally, would not use Pathfinder here. I'd use a Clipping Mask on the blade. Copy the blade shapes paste the copy on top of everything Draw a new shape which covers the areas of the blade you want to show on top of the snake. Make certain it'...


6

You want Edit / Preferences / Behaviour and you can set a number there. The lower the number, the less change when you try to simplify.


6

Hit CTRL+Y or go to View → Outline via the main menu Hit A or choose the Direct Selection Tool from the toolbar Select only those anchor points that belong to that "white" shape Hit Delete


5

First, add objects for intermediate steps. If you examine your sample it blends from medium > small > large > small > medium. There are 5 stages to that blend. So you need 5 objects. Here I've shown the intermediate steps as red circles. And then created the blend. Remember stacking order matters. Blend stack, by default, from the top object to the bottom ...


5

I learn something new nearly every day: From The Blog of the Baodad Tree website: How To Make a Trapezoid in Inkscape Draw a rectangle. Convert it to a path (Path > Object to Path) Use the node select tool (F2) to select the two corners of the rectangle that you want to adjust to form a trapezoid (You have to hold down the shift key to ...


5

Try this: Draw two lines with a thin stroke, one at the top and one at the bottom of the picture. Select both lines and use the Interpolate Extension, to create hundreds of lines. Update: after the OP's inclusion of an image, it's clear now that the desired effect is to create a Moiré pattern effect. This can be done using the same technique as above, ...


4

Thoughts: Your shadow paths should show differences in depth for the two different path heights, and also where the shadow of the upper path falls over the lower path (right hand ascending loop) there should be a jump in that shadow, so you can "read" the difference in height of the path relative to the white groundplane. Where the two shadows overlap under ...


4

I think I'd use the InkTan extension to generate the outline. Still needs a bit of path joining afterwards, but it will be exact by default. https://github.com/Rhysun/inkTan To turn these three objects into a single one, connect the ends of the tangents with new segments, so they form a rectangle, then do Path > Union with all three objects.


4

The TL:DR; solution to this is to use Inkscape: https://inkscape.org/ It's free, open source, cross platform. You can install on Ubuntu with "snap install inkscape" or use the installer on the website for PC and Mac. If you have the Adobe suite (and there's a 30 day free trial) you can use either Photoshop paths or Illustrator to import, edit and export ...


4

This is InDesign CS6. So, it's feasible there's a difference in newer CC versions... inDesign effects applied to placed graphics If the effect, such as drop shadow, is applied in InDesign to a placed graphic, it is possible to adjust the graphic opacity separate from the effect opacity. Merely use the Direct Selection Tool (White arrow) to select the ...


4

Add a fill to the character via the Appearance Panel Set the fill to be a gradient of your two color Rotate the gradient 90° so its horizontal Select each color stop of the gradient and set the Location to 50%. Add the stroke as desired Note you don't have to use 50% for the gradient stop location, but both stops need to be in the same location. If you want ...


4

Install the following script with these directions, then run it and adjust the parameter 100 as needed: #target illustrator var doc = app.activeDocument; var objs = doc.pageItems; traverseSceneObjects(objs, selectByCurveLengthFactory(100)); redraw(); function selectByCurveLengthFactory( length){ return function(item) { if ( item.length <= ...


4

You could use Illustrator CC's Rounded Corner Widget functionality. Draw a shape without curves, then select only the corner widgets you want to round by Shift+clicking them to make a multiple selection, then click and drag them to make the curves. Example Example


4

Obviously you want this: In the left there's some black shapes drawn as seen straight to downwards when flying above the shapes. The shapes are paths and path-like basic curves such as circles and rectangles. Raster images do not work nor groups, but paths and path-like curves which do not overlap (see NOTE1) can be combined with Path > Combine. In the ...


4

It's hard to see, and there's no commentary or explanation given in the video, but I think I know how it's done. No snapping options need to be set for it to work. In fact probably best to switch off all snapping in the snap controls bar so these don't conflict with rescaling. In Edit > Preferences > Behavior > Transform, make sure the option to "Scale ...


4

You are in View > Outline mode. Change to Preview mode to see full strokes and fills. The mode is shown in workspace tab headers in your screenshot.


4

The control points to adjust the pattern will be somewhere on your page, most likely in the top left hand corner of the page. It might be hard to see them. Perhaps try temporarily hiding the raster layer you are tracing over. You can do that in the Object > Objects panel, by clicking the eye icon to toggle visibility. Here's an example showing the ...


3

There's no special term, although you could just call it an outline, and there are several techniques that could be used. A semi-automated method is to make a copy of the design, make sure everything is ungrouped until there are no groups left, and do Path > Union or use the shortcut Ctrl++ Then do Path > Dynamic Offset or use the shortcut Ctrl+J, and ...


3

You can't join 3 end nodes together. It's not possible. You can only join 2. It's not because of the SVG format, it's because a vector can only have two end nodes, i.e. a start and an end point. Perhaps you could enable snapping to achieve exact placement of the nodes. Once placed, you could select all the end nodes and move as one, but there's no way to ...


3

Make a grid of lines. Have a bunch of equally spaced vertical lines and make +60 degrees and minus 60 degrees rotated copies. Group the lines for easy selection. Select the lines. Fill the areas with the shape builder. You can make it in pieces and continue from the earlier ones. You can well draw a sketch before filling with the shape builder (which is ...


3

The apparent width of the path should be in accordance with the viewing direction if the path is uniformly wide. 3D CAD program is a good consult for this: The left version is the top view and the other is a tilted view. In the top view the apparent width is constant, in the tilted view the apparent width varies. Another reason for apparent width ...


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