34

This completely depends on you and your designer. Most likely your designer is asking for the following things: What you want on your website. This includes what the purpose of the website should be and any important information related to that purpose, such as your company information that you want people to have, information about the services that you ...


10

Okay.. simply looking at the first design... This is merely my opinion.... First. The logo needs to be reworked. it is the #1 factor lending things to a "dated" or "old-fashioned" impression. It's got a very "1980s 'cheap'" feel to it reminiscent of when computers and technology first started making notable viability among ...


7

This looks exactly like a programmer trying to design something. Unfortunatelly it does not work and it is indeed, very outdated and old-fashioned by today's aesthetics: overall it looks like a throwback to those times when people designed entire websites inside a <table> element. you know, there is CSS now, in case you do use CSS, well sorry, it ...


5

Looking at any design, be it a website, flyer, brochure, poster, anything on paper or on screen, whitespace is literally what the name says: all the unoccupied space surrounding everything else on the design. Whitespace does not need to be white, it can be black or pretty much any color, the term refers more to that space in a design which is empty of any ...


5

I assume that you want your website to provide more business for your company. You've hired a web designer, not a marketer or sales person. You need to either provide marketing and sales information to the designer or give the task to someone else. Your designer was hired to build a site. To make sales (conversions) on your site you'll need marketing ...


4

I write line-of-business software so I spend a lot of time dealing with our clients' web companies. In my experience you can divide web companies into maybe four different variations. In ascending order of price: One-man-bands - someone who does web-design and came at it from either the design-side, or the coding-side and can do whichever isn't their ...


4

You say you tried to use the example as inspiration, but to be honest, I don't think you have implemented that "inspiration", and certainly not enough to achieve a similar look. Perhaps it's because you aren't seeing things as a designer does. This isn't really about following any rules, it's about developing an ability to see what makes ...


3

Know your audience It starts with knowing what you design and who you design it for. The color palette considered suitable for a funky new social networking site for young cat lovers in South Asia might look very different from the colors that would be considered working well for a new financial online service for young families. Psychology of colors There ...


3

I think the use of the word "modern" here is very broad, and usually means - minimalistic, clean, geometrical, efficient basically it means remove all unnecessary decorations and put the content in the center some tips to achieve modern look for your UI typography - prefer sans-serif fonts fonts - google fonts is a good source colors - colorhunt is a ...


3

For anyone stumbling upon this today looking for options, AdobeXD or Sketch are far superior to Photoshop mockups as they can be made client-side and interactable. XD can be ported to a phone through the XD app, but fonts need to be installed on the phone to display correctly. Adobe Comp is a mobile app that you can create mockups in on a phone (no pc ...


3

You could place a button next to the input box that says "Save answer" and use a checkmark on the button. Below, you could use a link button that says "Show answer" and use an eye icon. It sounds like, though, you want users to try to answer each question so that you can understand their difficulty, so you might want to not make the ...


2

Check out this site. https://www.programmingfonts.org/ The most condensed is Quinze, but it may be too much. I found glyphs were touching each other in some cases. Then there is sudo, wich works great with line-height 1.0 and is an OK compromise if you really want to save space. Many fonts are as condensed as Iosevka: M+, Terminus, Inconsolata Regular, etc......


2

Inconsolata now has plenty of different widths apart from regular width: SemiCondensed, Condensed, ExtraCondensed, UltraCondensed SemiExpanded, Expanded, ExtraExpanded, UltraExpanded


2

Just found an easy way via Safari. Right click on element, Inspect Element, then in the Inspector right click on the element node you want to export and pick Capture Screenshot. This to me keeps transparency. Safari Version 13.1 (14609.1.20.111.8)


2

A "Graphic Designer" is not a "Website Designer". A graphic designer only designs the look of something. Someone has to provide /everything/ else, and that is reasonable. If the "design team" is only "a graphic designer", and that is not what you want, then it is reasonable to terminate the relationship and go somewhere else.


2

The designer is just asking you input to perform his job. He can't guess what you have in mind and what are your requirements/priorities. The level of detail that you want to provide is certainly negotiable. Can range from "make a site for MyCompany" to "I want all hyperlinks underlined in dotted green, left centered, and here is the text of page Customers"....


2

I sometimes use InDesign to create images for the web. I've discovered a few tricks. Mind the pixel grid Pay attention to the pixel grid of your document. If you want boxes and horizontal and vertical lines to be crisp without anti-alising you need to make sure they align with the pixel grid. Here the objects are aligned with the grid (I notice that one ...


2

Whatever tree you'll be making, nobody's going to flick through 450 links of equal weight. You need to create some structure and break down this volume into smaller sections, groups, etc: create a search box at the top similar to what google shows on their homepage. then under that.. categorize: create 8-10-12 categories, list the categories, article count ...


2

I'm writing from a designer's side, but I've also been on the client's side many times, so I would say: If you have so many to choose from, try to ignore the pricing at first and just choose a couple of options that you think you like for whatever reason. Narrow it down to 2 options that at least stick to your branding and general ideas. That may be easier ...


2

This has nothing to do with Geocities as such. When people began making websites in the early days of the web, it was a very different environment. There was no high speed broadband, only very slow dial-up modem connections. Because of that, images file sizes on web pages had to be kept as small as possible so that they would load in a reasonable amount of ...


2

You could do it in Photoshop. The quickest and easiest way for a non-designer might be to buy or find a PSD mockup template, and just fill them with the screen content. Just google "PSD mockup template for tablet phone desktop" to find some. I'm not affiliated with Adobe, and don't really want to advertise for them, but there are many such good quality PSD ...


2

Generally, you can't assume that brand guidelines for use on web pages will also apply to print. I have managed to find information about using them in some print cases (which might not apply to your specific use-case): This page on use of google logos/trademarks says: Google typically does not allow third-party use of our logo or brand features to create ...


2

JPG is a lossy format, you can't expect anything to remain the same. Save as a PNG to retain all information.


2

This is exceptionally broad and opinion-based. Every designer will have their own opinion. There are no "rules" for what looks good. None. Simply put, you can't quantify "taste" or "beauty" as a set of rules. There's a psychology to every single aspect of a design that will alter perceptions. For example, purely looking at ...


2

Illustrator is merely an image editor. Nothing more. While more recent versions of AI have seen things like CSS and SVG more integrated, these are woefully lacking in terms of actually creating a web page. Illustrator is not designed to build even a single web page, let alone an entire web site. One would, at the very least, need a good text editor and an ...


1

Here's a few things you might want to consider when picking your colours. Contrast Make sure your information stands out against backgrounds are contrasting enough to be easy to ready. Environment Also with features like dark mode, you can consider the environment or time of the day your website will be used during. Accessibility Make sure your colours ...


1

You are right, resolution (the ppi) is ignored in browsers and email clients. It's irrelevant. All that matters for images on the web or screens is the pixel dimensions. In print however, it's a totally different story. What you need to know is the size at which the image will be physically reproduced in inches. So, let's say you have an image which is to ...


1

You are correct that cogwheel does not directly relate to telecom. As it is used by Apple, it means "settings", or more broadly, behind the scenes processes. Look at the essence of your list of services - at the most basic level it is data transmission, and at some stage it is all transmitted wirelessly via radio waves. I would recommend full or partial ...


1

Different ways to approach this, some inspiration via the Noun Project: https://thenounproject.com/search/?q=communication https://thenounproject.com/search/?q=network


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