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37

Depends on why you watermark You should not be so concerned with others swiping your designs. What you should be concerned is how to find clients and getting paid. Don't fall into the trap of thinking you're going to lose money at this stage from copying, because even if it happens there's no real way for you to turn it into money. Only care about money ...


36

This kind of depends upon who you ask. Here.... it would never be an option. Much the same way I do not work with a client standing behind me "dictating changes". There is no feasible reason why a client needs to be that close. If they wish to micro-manage to that degree, they need to hire an employee. As a freelancer, it is asking far too much in my ...


29

I've been in and out of the graphic design world over several decades, and have also spent a lot of time in both technical writing / illustration and architectural design & 3D modeling - in all those professional spheres, I've used screen sharing for communicating final presentations or interactive demos, I've used screensharing to teach, and on several ...


16

Adding to Emilie's great answer It's difficult to define what "stressful" is, because it varies from person to person (are designers more stressed than, say, surgeons?), so I'll just focus on the things that I think can make design different from other jobs. Note: Graphic Design is a HUGE field. You can work in print, in web, in motion... you can do ...


14

So it seems to me like you've spotted someone who has great potential, but that potential is not currently fitting your needs completely and you need to partly delegate his training. I can understand the wish to keep this person if they can do all you claim they can, they are a rare find! You say there is no rush and you can invest in resources. That's ...


13

Only watermark if you're trying to license There is only one time to watermark - when you're trying to sell the rights to the image such as a stock graphic. That's it. A good watermark that can actually slow someone down, and I say slow down not stop, is one that ruins your photo, graphic or illustration. All it will do is make your art less appealing to ...


13

Any work requested after the project has finished, has been signed off on and final files have been delivered, is a new job. Charge accordingly. If it is a small revision, charge for an hours work. Even small revisions take time. It takes time to find files and resources, re-export and prepare deliverables, upload, email etc. Even a 5 minute revision can ...


11

Since I like playing devil's advocate, I'll elaborate on situations where I think that kind of request would make sense. (spoiler: there aren't many) You have a client who has shown to be respectful of your work and time in the past, and the changes are content based, and there is a lot. Example from my experience: I had a client who is a pipe organ ...


10

I don't think it's "normal", although there are probably designers who do it. When deadlines have been tight, I've collaborated with clients over the phone while sharing static images with them at the same time using the Adobe Cloud, however I think screen sharing is akin to having the client stand behind you, and it's too invasive. Personally, I wouldn't ...


8

The common practice around these parts is to add 20%, but there is no standard amount. Having said that, I don't ever mark something up; it just goes straight through to the client. I like it better when I'm being compensated solely for design work, and I've never felt comfortable marking stuff up. Perhaps that stems from having spent too much time at the ...


8

If it's on the web.. watermarking doesn't hurt... but realize anything on the web will be stolen at some point. If you are the over-protective type, never put anything on the web you don't want stolen. A watermark really only deters casual theft, but anyone serious about using your work will either: A) not care there's a mark or B) use Photoshop to ...


8

The answer may lie in the difference between formative and summative assessment — the kind of feedback your employee requires to advance. Note: In the pedagogical feedback theory suggested below, substitute "your employee" for student and "acceptable/appropriate designer" for instructor. Formative assessment The goal of formative assessment is to monitor ...


7

Normally when you hire somebody it is to delegate some tasks so you don't need to get involved in everything personally. Now as this designer is clearly a junior, as energetic as he may be, this takes you back to spending time on tasks you meant to delegate. Hiring 1-2 more juniors can be an option and then filtering out the ones that don't make the goal or ...


7

This is a micromanager. This person is, as Billy Kerr notes, trying to stand over your shoulder and tell you exactly what to do. That is not a client you want to accommodate. Maybe this person doesn't trust you as a designer to execute his or her ideas, or thinks that his/her ideas are better than yours, or whatever the person's problem is. That doesn't ...


6

There are many branches of graphic design and although yes, I've heard all around me about graphic design being stressful jobs, I've managed quite well on that aspect in the past so I would tend to say that where there is a will there is a way. I didn't work much overtime and when I did, I got paid for it. I find there is often a culture of overworking in ...


6

Is this an arrangement someone would ever possibly agree to? Only entry level designers who don't know what they're doing. What you're asking for is a lot of work and for only name mention. You're asking them to gamble time and hard work on the chances that you'll be successful enough to support not only yourself but also their efforts. You're essentially ...


6

Not normal practice and you probably already know this from the way the question is asked. This is apparently about a logo so it cannot be text revisions, in which case he's probably looking to give you some ideas on revising the shape, the color, the symbol or whatever it is you are working on this logo. So it can't be a large volume of requests, instead ...


5

Look, you're a designer just starting out, and it sounds like you've shown enough talent to be noticed by a reputable client. You're off to a good start. Let's look at your career path from a long term perspective. As a free-lance designer, you're going to start out not making very much cash, and working hard to advance to bigger and better (and higher ...


5

It's all relative. No one lives or dies due to design, so I doubt anyone would say graphic design is nearly as a stressful profession as police, firemen, EMTs, doctors, nurses, etc have. Then again, I'd wager that graphic design can be more stressful than things like a farm hand, acupuncture therapist, hot air balloonist, etc. It can be stressful to meet ...


5

If you do not have a real alternative, do not quit. Consider it a job. If you actually have something else you love, and the design job is pulling you away, then you probably need to quit, since it is in the way. Another option is that you change the focus of your career. Design can be applied to many, many fields. See if your client fields are just as ...


5

I'm a big fan of multidisciplinary work so I really like how you're trying to make the best of both worlds. One potential area that I see is work with conductive inks and hybrid media. As both an electrical engineer and a graphic designer, it seems like you could be an asset as an hired consultant for people who want to inject some interactivity in their ...


4

If you are looking for freelance work, you can try Elance or Freelancer. Both sites allow you to upload your portfolio for a fee, but the best way to find projects in those is to browse the ones other users upload. I've worked with both, so I'd recommend you to be particularly careful about which projects you choose, there are lots of fake ones and it's ...


4

I don't know that there a "standard." I think it's whatever some people feel they can get away with. I use 20% here. But that 20% covers only the money out of my pocket. Time in finding, editing, and/or testing are all billable hours to me. Above and beyond the actual cost of the product.


4

You have my sympathies, this is a tricky thing. A very similar question has been asked before: How to hire a graphic designer? I would urge you: find someone local. Find the best you can, locally. Designing via email or even skype is a major hassle. It can be done, but I personally do not think it can be very efficient even if the people involved have know ...


4

From my own perception, the market is flooded. You'll be hard-pressed to get an actual job designing without any experience. There are hundreds if not thousands of graduates looking for employment every year in addition to the hundreds or thousands of self-taught people looking for employment. Your best bet is to study, work as much freelance as you can ...


4

I agree with Scott's answer and would like to give you a general perspective. But, firstly, some stress is good. It keeps you going; does not let you procrastinate and gives you an opportunity to better yourself continually. In my opinion, everything can be stressful if - If you don't like doing it. If you "want/agree" to do too much of it, too fast. If ...


4

Here are some ideas. If you use a tracking system for your work, you can use your completed tasks as inspiration for your next goal items. They are usually descriptive enough, and hold real value. If you don't, the same applies. It's always useful to think of a goal as set of tasks. What steps will you take when preparing, for example, the infographics? ...


4

Some push-back from clients is a common frustration for a designer. But there are several things that aren't normal about this environment: It's not normal for a company to be run by developers, for developers. Your boss would not normally be a developer, the person making the call about your designers would normally be a project manager or "product owner" ...


4

Like all business with a client base, it's customary for the receiving business to pay a premium for the client acquisition. You are handing the other designer clients on a silver platter. You are cutting the new designer's advertising, marketing, and sales costs. In fact, eliminating those costs entirely for your complete stable of clients. I have no idea ...


4

I would use that session only to take notes. The question is, is that normal? On a cheap workshop where the "designer" is the client, and the operator is just the interface to the computer, yes. On a studio, no. It is not professional. It is cheap, it makes think the client is the one filled with good ideas, with taste, with knowledge, with proportion... ...


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