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37

This kind of depends upon who you ask. Here.... it would never be an option. Much the same way I do not work with a client standing behind me "dictating changes". There is no feasible reason why a client needs to be that close. If they wish to micro-manage to that degree, they need to hire an employee. As a freelancer, it is asking far too much in my ...


29

I've been in and out of the graphic design world over several decades, and have also spent a lot of time in both technical writing / illustration and architectural design & 3D modeling - in all those professional spheres, I've used screen sharing for communicating final presentations or interactive demos, I've used screensharing to teach, and on several ...


11

Since I like playing devil's advocate, I'll elaborate on situations where I think that kind of request would make sense. (spoiler: there aren't many) You have a client who has shown to be respectful of your work and time in the past, and the changes are content based, and there is a lot. Example from my experience: I had a client who is a pipe organ ...


10

I don't think it's "normal", although there are probably designers who do it. When deadlines have been tight, I've collaborated with clients over the phone while sharing static images with them at the same time using the Adobe Cloud, however I think screen sharing is akin to having the client stand behind you, and it's too invasive. Personally, I wouldn't ...


8

Animation is not generally considered to be graphic design. It is a totally separate field. Although lately it has become more common to see animation coming out of graphic designers. Using blender is almost certainly not graphic design in general. But that does not stop a graphic designer to use it if they want to. Most of the other things you mention ...


7

This is a micromanager. This person is, as Billy Kerr notes, trying to stand over your shoulder and tell you exactly what to do. That is not a client you want to accommodate. Maybe this person doesn't trust you as a designer to execute his or her ideas, or thinks that his/her ideas are better than yours, or whatever the person's problem is. That doesn't ...


6

Everything you list would indeed fall under the blanket term "Graphic Design" in my opinion. Animation is to graphic design what web development is to graphic design or what 3D modeling is to graphic design. In that, yes some designers may be adept and perform those tasks, but they are not inherently seen as part of a graphic designer's skill set. Most in ...


6

Not normal practice and you probably already know this from the way the question is asked. This is apparently about a logo so it cannot be text revisions, in which case he's probably looking to give you some ideas on revising the shape, the color, the symbol or whatever it is you are working on this logo. So it can't be a large volume of requests, instead ...


5

I'm a big fan of multidisciplinary work so I really like how you're trying to make the best of both worlds. One potential area that I see is work with conductive inks and hybrid media. As both an electrical engineer and a graphic designer, it seems like you could be an asset as an hired consultant for people who want to inject some interactivity in their ...


4

I would use that session only to take notes. The question is, is that normal? On a cheap workshop where the "designer" is the client, and the operator is just the interface to the computer, yes. On a studio, no. It is not professional. It is cheap, it makes think the client is the one filled with good ideas, with taste, with knowledge, with proportion... ...


3

First, my background. I studied a couple of years of Mechanical Engineering before changing my career to graphic design. Although I was making visual things since I was like 8 years old and worked in a small Design firm when I was in high school, I enrolled in engineering thinking that Graphic Design was just a hobby. I was not bad at all since one person ...


2

Your question is rather subjective, and I would say there's no right or wrong answer here. However, for what it's worth, here's my opinion: I don't think you need to put "mid-level" or "senior" on a CV. If it were me, I wouldn't mention it. Your level of experience should be obvious if you list your employment history, and when you show them your portfolio. ...


1

Regarding how you would lay this out on a CV or resume you might want to put it under a header such as skills or bullet point programs you have used in your employment history/education. As the term graphic designer is pretty broad as discussed already I would try and create a CV/resume that caters for the job you are applying for. I have one or two that ...


1

Data visualization often requires a skill set that intersects with any science backgrounds. Since you were undoubtedly trained into using something like Matlab it can give you a serious leg up when it comes to doing statistical inferences from the data and custom processing of the data. Any signal processing you did can come handy when using Photoshop too. ...


1

Probably not possible in a specific or common way. Many people can fix cars and play the piano and go do the 3k marathon swimming and cycling, while their day job is in real estate. That doesn't mean everything can or should be mixed. Its different things you do when a specific opportunity arrives. If the opportunity calls for a mix, do it, otherwise, it is ...


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