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Why justify Justification can make an important contribution to extended reading: Taming the visual 'noise' in a page of text. Nick Shinn made a particularly keen observation in this regard on Typophile: Justification avoids the "interference" of having shapes and coinicidences occur at the right column edge, which can be a distraction, as the reader ...


16

All given answers here seems to be only for English. I just want to add another language: German. German has a lot of long words (much longer as English words). If you want to typeset a German text on paper with justification you can do it only with hyphenations. LaTeX does a very good job with automatic hyphenations for the German language. It also ...


12

I just found out how to avoid hyphenation in a single word, which took me a long time, so I am posting it here for anyone else looking for it: Select the word you want to "keep together". Open the Character window/palette, it's on Cmd-T. Click the tiny menu in the upper-right corner of that window. Select the last option, no break. Voila!


7

c) is the right way the rest simply doesn't exist check http://www.bestessays.com/splitting_words_guide.php


7

Here's an article from the English Language & Usage Stack Exchange with some varying opinions. Personal opinion: don't hyphenate flush left text. Hyphenation is only acceptable in long documents and even then it should be regulated.


5

It is possible both to add new hyphenation rules to existing language dictionaries in InDesign and to add new language dictionaries.   Adding a language (Albanian) The exact steps you have to take to add a dictionary for a new language vary according to your OS (operating system) and which version of InDesign you’re using. There is a very clear and ...


5

For your two questions: Does this phenomenon have a name? I believe the (obscure) name you are looking for is "ladders" (which is usually used when you have 3 or more consecutive hyphenated lines); however, since most people are not too familiar with the term, I've also seen it referred to in generally descriptive terms like "consecutive hyphenated lines" ...


4

I've never see anyone do a) or b) ... c) is the way to go. I don't really have a lot of hard evidence to back it up, other than I've never seen the alternatives and InDesign doesn't do it.


2

Close all your Documents (this makes any change global, so it applies to every new document afterwards) with InDesign still open, Go to Type > Paragraph > Tip arrow options Choose Hyphenation > shut it off


1

I figured it out. The target file has a + beside the [Basic Paragraph]+ Style. I noticed that it was set to hyphenate, for some reason. The file was obviously created that way. Even when I changed the style to defaults, saved the file, then closed/re-opened, the [Basic Paragraph]+ Style had hyphenation on again. There were some other odd settings in that ...


1

With InDesign launched and active and no document open, uncheck the Hyphenation option on the Paragraph Panel. That will turn off Hyphenation for any new document and honor any pasted text frame hyphenation setting. Essentially, adjusting things like this without a document open sets it's preference overall. In addition, you may need to edit the [basic ...


1

You can do it by using a set of find/replace functions to replace every space character with an en space, and inserting a very narrow space character between each letter, so InDesign will not see the words as actual words, but it will look like words. This will result in lines breaking wherever the text meets the text frame's edge. First, find and replace ...


1

Insert a discretionary line break in the position where InDesign breaks the word. A Discretionary Line Break adds a preferred position to break a word but does not display the usual hyphen - very useful to indicate preferred breaks in long URLs, for example (after all slashes). From your example I understand you don't necessarily want to have breaks in '...


1

The "no document open" thing has never worked in Illustrator - I believe you may be thinking of Indesign there. In Illustrator, with no document open, there are no paragraph or character styles even available. You have to edit the [Basic Paragraph] paragraph style in the Document Profiles for Illustrator - the startup files. Here's Adobe's rundown on ...


1

My bet would be that B and C might be either an older tradition or some Central European (German/Austrian) custom. I am Croatian and I found recently that newest orthography manual says this is how it is done in my language, although I don't remember that I've ever seen it in practice. Since many orthographic rules in Croatian were set way back when we where ...


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