53

The Go button should be bigger and have the highest contrast of all since it's the primary one. The Clear button is okay because it's a secondary action and it should be neutral. For me the Switch button has too much presence both in size and constrast. I'd position it between the Origin-Destination dropdowns, where it make more sense "by itself". ...


51

A wireframe is about functionality. It can be a really simple sketch that demonstrates what sort of things you can do in your design. For example, a wireframe of a website will show the navigation, the main buttons, the columns, the placing of different elements. You can think of it as a blueprint for a website. A mockup is a realistic representation of ...


32

Your arrow concept and what you plan to use it for seem appropriate. And from what I can see, I guess you don't have much room for icons anyway. Maybe what could help you is simply to use thicker and curved arrows to hide that effect you don't like. Below is a quick example: You might need to adjust the arrows to your preference and clarity when at small ...


30

Any single colour can be worked into a working colour setting, even for a website. So, yes, they are right in stating that using their blue is good for brand recognition. A good idea might be to take the original #2DCCD3 and create less bright, saturated versions of it to use next to the base colour. You can create these shades using the HSB colour model. ...


26

Edit: Since you keep pushing :) I will answer directly: Is the style, creativity, & inspiration side of interface design not equally important compared to the content, efficiency, & productivity side of interface development? is it not important to focus on additional fancy style? I have a little problem with the question, as there are ...


24

From a purely design standpoint, starting with the mobile version first does make sense. The hardest part of the design process is always pruning, never adding. So the smaller the screen real estate you allow yourself, the more you'll have to think about what is important in your design, what information you really need to show. Also, you'll force yourself ...


17

Wireframes are rudimentary shapes or lines used to designate position and/or size only. The goal of any wireframe is to "fit" the elements into a layout, not indicate how elements may actually appear in a final design, only where they will be located. Mockups are built on top of wireframes and go further to show overall appearance aspects of a design ...


16

It's the print tiling indicator, basically showing you what and where your artwork will print with the print page size you currently have set. You can turn it on and off from the view menu (View → Hide/Show Print Tiling). You can even move it around manually with the Print Tiling tool, but unless you're directly printing from Illustrator there's ...


15

I think all you need to do is change your text color to White:


15

Short answer: Form follows function. It's an age-old but often forgotten design principle: how things look or are shaped should follow what they are for. Function shouldn't be twisted or squeezed to fit a form. A user interface is for use and usability, so if you're making compromises on function (usability) in the name of form (aesthetics), you've got ...


15

Most of the time for live sites you should not have a page at all or, if you really want it live (perhaps to show to others and you don't have a development site), don't link to it publicly anywhere. This is because if a user sees that you have content that interests them enough to click on it, they are expecting to see the page. Having an "under ...


15

Actually there may be a great deal of thought put into such usage, well beyond personal preference or some client directive. Style If you know you want a more friendly, loose "feel" then you would go with more rounded shapes. If you want a more corporate, serious appearance, you'd lean towards corners, triangles, and generally hard line shapes. ...


13

On your home page put a big ad: Do you really like this web site? Want to help make it better? I'm looking for a UI/UX designer to collaborate with to make this project better. I wish I could pay but it's a labor of love for me, so hoping it is for you.


12

One solution is to visually separate your button by priority. You'd typically have primary button(s), secondary button(s) and sometimes tertiary button(s) and/or non-preferred action buttons. For Primary and Secondary, I usually suggest your preferred branding color (purely subjective) in two levels of contrast. High contrast for primary, slightly less ...


11

Do interfaces really need to “look good”? Nope. As you state, and prove, some very highly succesful websites that have horrific UIs succeed. Reddit is a great example. As is Craigslist. So no, you do not need a great looking UI to succeed. But a site better have some really amazing content to make it worth getting through a really bad UI. In other words, ...


11

I support detailed reply of @Yisela, also to add this vision exposed in following presentation


11

Mobile first is best practice -- it's not law, and if you understand why you "should" be using it, you can make an informed decision as to why you don't want to use it on a particular project, and that's fine. It's worth noting that "mobile first" relates to the design/UX and the build itself. Mobile first design won't speed up your site for users, but ...


11

You could simply be straight forward with it....


10

As @Bennett McElwee also points out, the checkmark is something we're getting more and more used to in our interfaces. Also the asteriks is used to indicate something that's not saved. We might combine the two into one button that changes state depending on the state of the document that it refers to: (icons adapted from https://github.com/icons8/flat-...


10

I would say no. Most of all: They will not look good in tiny versions They are too "predefined" in style: SE have a multitude of sites, and in very few of them will it fit the rest of the site They are too "militant"/gamey with over/undertones of religion, imperialism, war, power etc The symbolism will have to be learned on a much more complex level than ...


10

The topics are good, but most of these questions are too narrow to be good interview questions. If it can be answered in one word, it's too narrow, it needs to spark a conversation: Instead of "how long did X take", try "Talk us through the process for X, from initial brief to completion". Then you'll learn how they handle projects, how they develop briefs, ...


10

This is the exact way that Luke Wroblewski indicated single tap and double tap with his gesture icons: These have become de-facto standards in UX wireframes, but can't say if they'd be intuitive to your users of your software. The catch is that a double-click, itself, isn't an intuitive action to begin with. It's a learned interaction. That said, those ...


10

Okay.. simply looking at the first design... This is merely my opinion.... First. The logo needs to be reworked. it is the #1 factor lending things to a "dated" or "old-fashioned" impression. It's got a very "1980s 'cheap'" feel to it reminiscent of when computers and technology first started making notable viability among ...


9

Finding excellent designers are hard. Not because they are few, but because the MAIN thing is how you & the designers communicate, get along, like each other, understand each others standpoint and language, how the designer envisions your aims. Find designs you like, and find out who did it. Collect samples of what you like, so you have something to ...


9

A business startup that expects 3-4 day turnarounds on well-designed websites? A startup with arbitrary and poorly-communicated goals? A startup that plans to give up on development if "people" aren't interested? (Who are these "people"?) Alarm bells! It doesn't sound like your employer has a reliable strategy at all, and if he believes that a high-quality ...


9

I think the hambuerger menu is recognizable by the vast majority of users nowadays, when in the right context. In your example, I do not think it is obvious. I usually expect to see the icon for expanding a menu, whether it be a hamburger icon, three vertical dots or a "menu" link on the top right edge of the screen, possibly the left top. But there in the ...


9

The answer to your question lies in the psychological concept called Contour Bias as illustrated in the book Universal Principles of Design. As the book quotes: Objects with pointed features elicit stronger activations in the regions of the brain related to associative processing, meaning that although the angular objects were less liked, they elicited a ...


9

Yes But being creative or artistic does not necessarily mean "ability to draw". Creativity is a must-have. A good designer needs to be able to imagine/see information in various constructs, envision color usage, often determine imagery to be used. All this takes creative thinking. While you generally don't have to be creative enough to come up with ...


8

The problem with your link is proximity and emphasis. If you want people to notice it you need to add design to the entire page such as background colors to direct the user to different parts. That is a starting point for adding emphasis to the Upload Prenda. Depending on what you do with backgrounds, graphics, and the design you may also need to adjust ...


8

When Mac applications come with their own fonts, you can often find these within the application package (which is technically just a folder): Right-click on the application icon within the Applications folder and choose Show Package Contents. A new Finder window containing subfolders will open. Instead of rummaging each and every subfolder for the font ...


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