Hot answers tagged

33

Bill them by the hour, half hour, quarter hour. If you have an ongoing relationship with them and want to "give" them this one, keep track of the time, and tack it onto another job. If this is the only thing you are ever going to do for them, bill them. I have numerous clients that I do many small changes on things throughout the month. I usually just ...


29

Unpopular personal opinion :)) With that being said ( :)) ), let's put things into perspective, ok? You have a contract, in that contract you agreed to supply 3 concept designs out of which they chose only one! That's it! In any such contract, you should also add that if the client should want 2 or all 3 concepts developed and delivered, they agree to pay ...


23

Consider the upside of giving them away - (As a loss leader) For good or bad I think I break most of the "rules" of running a freelance business daily. That said, I've been running a successful business for fifteen years, so I must be doing something right! In this case - based on the assumption that someone printing a t-shirt design would likely want to ...


23

Bill them your regular rate. They will either pay or they'll come back with questions. Worry about the latter only if it happens.


18

I have a block of 10 changes they can buy. Emphasise what a good deal it is. Otherwise point out that it's great they have the source files as now they can change them themselves free of charge! NOTE: it took you years of studying, working and practicing to change something in "15 mins". It will take them hours. Charge for the time you save them not how ...


13

Alin has the right idea here. Your contract states that the client is paying for one logo. If your client wants to pay for the other two, great! Calculate a fair discounted price for the second and third. Thirty percent of the total contract for each is probably not bad; it depends on the market, the client, and your relationship. You might go as high as ...


10

Bill them your regular rate and add an amount for a rush-job and mark it clearly in your invoice. Be open to explain or even negotiate, as other users have already suggested. In your question there is a lack of communication, so you can make a first move towards more and detailed communication with a well written and fully detailed invoice. Once they realize ...


9

Either... Bill them at a similar rate to the previous job. Assuming you and the client were both happy with that rate the last time and you would be happy with it this time then there's no reason to assume any different on the clients part. Bill them at your normal rate (assuming that's any different to the last job). I mean... that's how it works, right? ...


8

I would be inclined to give them 1 edition notice. i.e. If I'm retiring in August 2020, I'd tell them when the July 2020 Edition is complete. Possibly when the invoice for the July work is sent. I'd start with a simple informative email: Hi, client I wanted to let you know that I will be retiring this month and will not be available for future editions of ...


7

After running my design company for over 30 years, a small additional piece of advice, for future situations like this: get yourself some terms and conditions, on paper. Make sure you show your clients these Ts and Cs before working with them, and then if anything like this comes up in the future you can draw their attention to that part of your mutual ...


5

If they told you the budget upfront for the last job, you could try and ask them again what they were planning to spend on this new one. Or.. Compare this job with the previous and bill accordingly. If the previous job was X, and this new job was the same effort, charge the same X, 2*X for twice the effort or X/2 for half the effort and so on. But ...


5

This isn't an every-day occurance, and there is no real answer, more you need to decide how to play the situation. Do they stand to profit from the t-shirts? Are they a new client or one you need to keep happy (early stage)? Are they a long standing client that you already have a good relationship with? As they have clearly offered to pay for them and ...


5

You have to remember that you are most probably going to keep working in the industry and it matters what quality of work you officially release as "done". So if in addition to 1 main article of work you also publish 2-3 more unfinished designs (sketches, rushed, unpolished, dirty), think of how that would make your portfolio look. If you're deciding to put ...


5

The fact that they have the source files is a bit of a red herring. They well may have wanted those to guard against needing changes in the future, and finding you were busy, working somewhere else, or refused to do them for some reason. Then they could engage someone else (possibly at great expense) to work out what you did. However for a small change, you ...


4

This could work, if its part of the original arrangement. I've had my share of pieces that failed to get a decent ROI as well. So, if this particular piece is so beautiful and successful, you'd like to have a recurring piece of it, but if other items are not so successful, will you be willing to offer discounts ? I'd say while it does sound tempting to ask ...


4

I think that you are looking at this wrong. You are considering the work you put into creating those, which was already covered by your initial contract. Your client seems to be thinking of it differently. You have provided them with a service, with which they are satisfied. In separate and, for all intents and purposes, unrelated transaction, they also wish ...


4

While there is the immediate impulse to charge as recommended by others here, if you know this only takes 15 minutes, be polite. More so if your previous experience with the client was good and have no reason to avoid them. Keeping this relationship floating could bring in more consistent work in the future. I see you mention the possibility of more such ...


2

If your original contract with the client clearly outlines the conditions of future edits on the original source files, bring those details to their attention. If you are indeed exempt from future revisions (per the language of the contract) and they still want the revisions, let them know it will be billed as a new job and write up a new contract that ...


2

It is better to ask these questions before starting work with a Сlient. Everything always depends on the details of each specific project including paperwork that was carried out. With typical contracts, I don't think graphic designers have any chance to get any "reprint fee". In most cases, the resulted print-ready file is the Client's property, ...


1

You have to choose, are you selling your business or just closing it down. Presume you are closing it down, estimate how much time it will take your client to find a compatible replacement for you but not leave before you close down. With your knowledge of the business and your knowledge of your client, you should be able to determine the length of time. One ...


1

I have found that the usage calcs done by professional photographers helped me a lot in the past - here's a link to a resource I've used before: AOP usage fee calculator A typical dayrate for a decent professional photographer in the US right now (where I am at the moment) is ~ $1000, so I start with that, and you should set based on the most common ...


1

I don't know who came up with this idea of offering options, but that infected the whole market. Personally, I never offer options to my clients - be it logo, website or ad. I sit with the client and work through the briefing and present the client the logo he wants. Then we adjust it if necessary - sometimes it's not. And my client retention rate is ...


1

How many times have you had to call a utility or credit card company for adjustments to bills, and they say they will do a "one-time courtesy" adjustment? Indicate this is a one-time courtesy, perhaps keeping track of the time spent. Then if they come back for more work give them a choice of paying for the prior work, or pay an advance deposit on the next ...


1

While working on a larger project for an important client, I was assigned some additional work, that was “thrown in for free” to make the sale. When the client later decided to not use my work, I learned that it was easy for them to throw away a month of my time, since it cost them nothing. (I was salaried, but I could have spent time on another project a ...


1

If you have an existing agreement which does not cover subsequent changes and this is clearly additional work rather than rectifying a fault then you don't really want to set a precedent that you will do indefinite additional work for free. On the other hand you also don't want to alienate a client for the sake of 15 minutes work. As a good compromise I ...


1

Your client has come to the realisation that doing changes even inhouse has a cost associated with it. Perhaps even that your cost is not high after all. Thing is you need to deliver to bring in money. Somebody with this as a side job may take very long to do the same. This is a good example as to why not burn bridges, even if it seems like the other party ...


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