Hot answers tagged

64

I think your reply is fine. I would perhaps alter it slightly, you don't need to rationalize prices and doing so can often convey a weakness in negotiation: I would really enjoy completing some additional work for you. Unfortunately, I can't take the commission at the same conditions as last year. My rates have increased. I can consider new work if you're ...


58

Make a phone call. Do not use an e-mail for this interview. You can't even know if he is answering this questions or he is just mentioning some previous ideas he has. If it is unpaid... do not do it. You are not only damaging yourself but the whole industry. The "Oh, I'm new" is not a reason at all. Either you have practiced a lot and have become ...


35

Asking for a "mood board" is waaaaaaaaaaaaaay too much to ask any client. That's perhaps a designer's tool and a client should never be asked to do that work. That's what they are paying you for (or not paying as the case may be). Rafael is correct when he posted make a phone call. Often in emails people skim and don't actually read. So things get missed, ...


29

Unpopular personal opinion :)) With that being said ( :)) ), let's put things into perspective, ok? You have a contract, in that contract you agreed to supply 3 concept designs out of which they chose only one! That's it! In any such contract, you should also add that if the client should want 2 or all 3 concepts developed and delivered, they agree to pay ...


24

I have bad news. Even if your pricing model does not work on hours spent. It has to account for hours ( or any other timespan) spent, at least in aggregate. What do I mean by this? Ultimately it is all about covering your cost, cost of business and cost of living. So if you miscalculate this you will eventually lose out. Bad news here is that you may not ...


23

Consider the upside of giving them away - (As a loss leader) For good or bad I think I break most of the "rules" of running a freelance business daily. That said, I've been running a successful business for fifteen years, so I must be doing something right! In this case - based on the assumption that someone printing a t-shirt design would likely want to ...


21

Print costs have nothing to do with the design costs. These are two separate things. A design could be simple taking an hour or less, or it could be complex and take many hours of work, but the cost of printing it would be the same regardless, assuming the same printing spec such as number of colours and ink coverage.


19

Tell the truth, it does no harm. Perhaps try: I'm afraid that for the project we did last year I underestimated the amount of effort, and I ended up out of pocket, so I'm going to have to quote a more realistic price this time round. or I was short of work last year, so I bid a very low price to be sure of getting the contract, partly because I knew ...


19

Yes. If you work on anything for a client it's billable. It doesn't matter if it's an entirely new item or a reformatting of an old/existing item. They all take your time and it's your time you charge for. i.e. The poster may take you 8 hours to design... the social media content may take you an additional 2 hours to reformat the poster art to fit online ...


18

Your client doesn't know what they want, and they don't know what any of the things you ask mean. You know the industry that the client works in, you know the name. Throw together a few different ideas in very rough draft. Send them to the client making very clear that these are rough sketches to get a concept not a final piece and ask them to rate each ...


15

Capitalism means I'm free to charge whatever I want. No one has to pay it, but I am free to set my pricing however I wish. There's nothing stating you can't merely pull a figure out of thin air and see who bites. There's never any need to explain or rationalize pricing to anyone. Thats what free market is all about. I charge what I think I should earn and ...


13

In a capitalistic world... you are free to charge whatever you want to charge. It makes no difference if you charge 100%, 200%, 500%, or 1000% more than any printing costs. The only thing which matters is... what will clients be willing to pay. That being posted, I would always charge a markup on any carried costs. If printing costs X, then I would charge ...


13

Alin has the right idea here. Your contract states that the client is paying for one logo. If your client wants to pay for the other two, great! Calculate a fair discounted price for the second and third. Thirty percent of the total contract for each is probably not bad; it depends on the market, the client, and your relationship. You might go as high as ...


7

After running my design company for over 30 years, a small additional piece of advice, for future situations like this: get yourself some terms and conditions, on paper. Make sure you show your clients these Ts and Cs before working with them, and then if anything like this comes up in the future you can draw their attention to that part of your mutual ...


6

No. If the client paid for a license to use a specific typeface, then the client owns that license and should not be charged every time the typeface is utilized. In addition, if the client specifically paid for the license, you should only be using that typeface for their projects. For this reason I much prefer to purchase typefaces for me/my company than ...


6

Your basic confusion or problem is this: You are assuming that in some way your new quote has to refer to the old quote in some way. Here's the entire formula for telling the client what price you want for the new job: State the price you want Here's an astounding fact! In 100.0% of cases in this universe when someone has stated the price they want, ...


6

First, It's not good for you nor for the whole sector to do free works. But I understand that at first is hard to take money from someone who trusts you. I think that the problem is the questions you are asking and how you are asking them. These questions are made almost in argot, you are using a very straightforward and professional language. My approach ...


6

I've been freelancing for a few years now, I've worked at some small studios wearing many hats. My two cents from what I've learned over the years: You should get a timer like Toggl to track your time regardless of the project. After doing this for a while, it will help you gauge future projects because you'll be able to compare time, and realize what areas ...


5

If you are looking for some answers on pricing, I read a really good article called: "The Dark Art of Pricing" by Jessica Hische if you haven't already seen it take a look it helped me. A few bullet points: Pricing hourly punishes efficiency. Pricing hourly seems much easier than flat rate pricing, but because you have to give clients a ballpark full-...


5

This isn't an every-day occurance, and there is no real answer, more you need to decide how to play the situation. Do they stand to profit from the t-shirts? Are they a new client or one you need to keep happy (early stage)? Are they a long standing client that you already have a good relationship with? As they have clearly offered to pay for them and ...


5

You have to remember that you are most probably going to keep working in the industry and it matters what quality of work you officially release as "done". So if in addition to 1 main article of work you also publish 2-3 more unfinished designs (sketches, rushed, unpolished, dirty), think of how that would make your portfolio look. If you're deciding to put ...


5

A big, bold and uppercase YES. The whole purpose of an hourly rate is for it to be applied to everything you produce for the client. You just count the time for every request sent you get, and yes that includes adaptations of existing artwork. Also.. The hourly rate should also be applied to writing email, phone calls, taking a taxi to join their meeting, ...


4

I think that you are looking at this wrong. You are considering the work you put into creating those, which was already covered by your initial contract. Your client seems to be thinking of it differently. You have provided them with a service, with which they are satisfied. In separate and, for all intents and purposes, unrelated transaction, they also wish ...


4

How good are you compared to your competition? Especially local competition. Is there a lot of competition in your area? What's the local economy like? Are there a lot of small business? Do the businesses seem to care much about branding, or is it almost entirely word of mouth? How much time do you spend on a given project? Pricing is probably one of the ...


4

If the agency is hiring you to do work for them, then odds are you are being brought on in a 'work for hire' model, which is pretty much the same as if you were an employee in the sense that anything you create, you are creating for the agency and the agency owns full rights. So, no, there is no 'royalty' fee associated with it. This is the most typical ...


4

I have been in the screenprinting / embroidery / graphic design industry for over 25 years. As far as I am concerned, this is how it works… The customer pays me for art work or for me to create any design for him. It makes absolutely zero difference what the design will be used for. The service is straightforward. Customer wants or needs a design, I ...


3

If you expect that they are only going to sell a few (or even a few hundred) products then I would recommend charging them a reasonable flat fee for the work that they need you to do. You could include in this a stipulation that there is a maximum number of products that they can use the design on before paying again. This is the model used by some stock ...


3

If you are charging a flat rate based on the project, as you mentioned earlier, make sure you give a clear description of what that covers. Some clients, as I'm sure you know will ask for many revisions while others will gladly accept what you design for them on the first round. So setting clear expectations around your 'fixed price' will help avoid ...


3

In addition to the sorta-mathematical ways to determine a price shown above, the soundest piece of wisdom I've heard regarding this is "Don't submit a rate unless you're embarrassed by it"


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